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Albacore Custom Centerboard

albacore sailboat centerboard

We are a proud supporter of the Canadian Albacore class association.

albacore sailboat centerboard

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albacore sailboat centerboard

Available fixed, or for kickup head (send details of your current headstock).

Hi-Aspect Rudder

albacore sailboat centerboard

Available for fixed or kickup head.

Sitka spruce, with a fiberglass laminate (s-glass buildup at the waterline!). This has proven to be a popular item with our Albacore customers.

albacore sailboat centerboard

Phil,  Just thought would let you know I gave Heather (my wife) the rudder for her birthday on March 20th and it was a huge success. She is extremely pleased and can hardly wait to get it assembled and on the boat. She rewarded me with a big kiss. – David D.

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ALBACORE TUNING GUIDE

Introduction.

The settings in this guide will help you get the most out of your Albacore North Sails. As always experimentation and documenting will enhance your specific boat. The weight of the crew, the balance of the boat, the stiffness of the mast and local wind and sea conditions will impact your tuning. This guide was developed with the Superspar M2 mast and B2 boom.

Boat Set-Up: Foils

The basic hull and foil set up is similar for most Albacore builders and sails. Typically the centerboard is moved as far aft in the boat as the rule allows. The minimum allowable distance from the transom to the leading edge of the centerboard when lowered 90° to the hull is 2600 mm measured along the curve of the hull. It is normal to have the board within 1 5mm of this measurement.

It is increasingly common to rake the centerboard forward in flat water and in winds less than approximately 1 2 knots. Ensure the board can do this and that the 90° position is clearly marked and visible inside the boat. The trend is also to have flexible centerboards that have good gust response and give a slight gibing effect when raked forwards in light to moderate winds.

Make sure that the centerboard and rudder are aligned. With the mast off and the boat upside down, stand behind the boat and sight along the foils. I f they are not aligned, normally the rudder has to be moved to bring the foils into alignment.

Mast Butt Position and Rake

The maximum forward position of the mast butt is 3350 mm measured from the aft face of the transom to the fore side of the mast at the foot. 3335 mm is the recommended starting point for North sails. This will provide sufficient pre-bend without compromising the ability to ram the mast far enough aft to allow the boom to pivot around the leeward shroud while sailing downwind. The most robust measurement for rake is to mark the mast at the hull sheer line. Put a straight edge across the partners aft of your mast and measure down the shear line on both sides of the boat. Use the hull skin to deck intersection. Calculate the average of those two. Place a mark on your mast that same average distance down from the top deck. Disconnect the bottom of the headstay and swing it to the mark you just made on your mast. Mark the headstay at that point. (extend with line if necessary). Replace the headstay back to the bow. Hoist the jib and tighten the halyard just enough to take the slack out of the shrouds. The mark on your headstay measured to the top surface of the deck at the bow should be about 6”. I f it is not you may need to move your shrouds up or down to achieve the 6″. This is your max forward light air setting. In winds above 1 5 knots it is common to pin the shrouds down one pin from this position. Above 20 knots two pins is common.

North Sails

North Albacore Sails are cut to be powerful. Both main and jib have a fair amount of depth which is needed for superior downwind performance. In order to achieve superior upwind performance proper mast bend is required. The objective is to add just enough bend to keep the leech tell- tales flickering while in full power mode, and then as much bend as is required to flatten the sails in stronger winds. Bend is achieved primarily with boom vang, but pulling the mast forward at the partners, easing the jib halyard, and lots of main sheet all contribute to mast bend.

A system to increase the bend of the mast at the partners is very important. A strut is the preferred method because it it raises the fulcrum where the bend occurs, but a simple tackle system at the partners will suffice. In most wind conditions upwind the mast must be pulled forward or “pre-bent” so that it resides about 1 ” -2” from front of the partners. In very light winds the mast will have to be bent all the way to the front of the partner to open the leech. In strong winds the mast should be allowed to bend to within 0.5” of the partner (any more than that and you risk over-bending and damaging the mast when you ease the head-stay). In light winds the mast will be fully pre-bent while reaching. The amount of pre- bend is gradually reducing as the wind increases. The correct time to reduce the pre-bend can be hard to judge, however if the mast is not pre-bent enough, the luff of the main is too full and the leech ticklers are difficult to fly all at the same times as the ticklers 1 /3 back from the luff. When this is correct, all ticklers can be flown.

A good way to check the spreaders is to set the mast at the max forward, light air position. There should be zero shroud deflection in any plane (I.E. totally straight shrouds with no deflection at the spreader tips). Put your eye close to the chainplate and sight up the shrouds. This should produce a spreader length of about 1 5-1 5.5” and a sweep of approx. 7” (Standard spreaders have to be shortened to achieve this). This position is a good starting point for crew weights of up to 360 lb. Above this consider increasing the length of the spreaders by 0.5-1 ”.

Jib Sheeting Position

A good way to start is to fold the jib head to the jib tack and mark the mid- point of the luff. Then draw a line on the clew patch from this point to the clew of the jib. By eye extend this line down to the jib track. Experience has shown that the best light/moderate jib lead position is about 4-6” aft of this point. Further forward of this and the lower third of the jib can get too full. As the wind increases the jib car needs to be moved aft. In very strong winds this sheeting position can be as much as 1 0” aft of the starting position. This will flatten the foot of the jib and open the leech. It is important not to over-sheet the jib so that the main is backwinded, or, the jib leech tell tail is stalled. The jib height must be adjusted so that the foot of the jib is in full contact with the foredeck upwind. The jib height can be adjusted through the lashing of the sail to the wire at the head. It is a good idea to raise the jib in light air to get extra sail area, and lower it in heavy air to keep the foot touching the deck when the jib car is moved aft.

Main/Jib Cunningham

The function of the cunningham is to move the point of max depth forward, or aft in the sail. Tightening the luff pulls the max depth forward. Maintain the max depth of the main just forward of half way. The more the mast bends the more Cunningham will be required. The jib max depth should be further forward about 1 /3 of the way back from the luff. (like an airplane wing) It is important that the jib and main cunningham are released off wind.

The North main is powerful at the foot so it is important that this is restrained upwind. In very light winds the outhaul is pulled so that the foot is taught. Above 1 5 knots it is pulled very tight. When reaching the outhaul needs to be eased. Maximum power is approximately 2-3” of release on the outhaul. This will be sufficient to open the foot of the main.

Jib Halyard Tension

In light winds upwind, the jib halyard is often set to allow for about 2” of sag at the mid luff. This should provide great speed and a wide groove. Tightened a little to improve pointing or slackened a bit to increase speed. Limiting Jib wire sag to about 2″upwind is important until the wind becomes overpowering. Above this, the sag is less important because the jib halyard is let off to increase mast bend and rake. It is a good idea to mark your halyard adjuster to know where your rake is. Check the section above “Mast Butt Position and Rake”. Mark your halyard adjuster on the mast at a point where you achieved 6” of rake. Then make a scale on it in 1 ” increments. 8-1 0″ of rake is common at the upper wind ranges. The halyard is loosened, the vang is tightened and the shrouds are pinned down. While reaching the jib halyard is eased to achieve 2-4” of jib wire sag. Many of the top boats have a system to tension the fore-stay while reaching in light to moderate conditions. With this applied, the halyard can be loosened to give jib luff sag and a powerful jib without affecting the mast bend control.

The vang is completely loose in light winds. As the wind increases a little use the vang to keep the top batten parallel with the boom. More and more vang is used as the wind builds. Once you are both hiking a harder vang will bend the mast and depower the sails. It is a sensitive control and too much vang can lead to a sail with too tight a leech, or too flat a main. Too little vang can lead to too deep a main, or too much twist. Correct vang adjustment and appropriate jib halyard are critical to maintaining good balance and the right amount of power. When reaching the vang is used to keep the top of the main from getting too loose. Good reaching speed is obtained with constant adjustment of vang and deck level mast bend in response to the changing conditions. Try to keep all of the main ticklers flying.

Wing on Wing

When wing on wing, it is important to get the boom out as close to 90° as possible, and the jib foot snug. With this in mind, the jib halyard is loosened off by at least 6” and the mast rammed all the way to the back of the partners. It is common to let the jib halyard off to give 8”+ of jib wire sag. Above 6-8 knots get the jib out and away from the mainsail. Normally the centerboard is fully in the case and the boat is heeled to windward. Vang should be set to give just a small amount of leech twist as can be seen from the photo.

George Carter

2015 International Champion

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One-Design Class Type: Dinghy

Was this boat built to be sailed by youth or adults? Adult

Approximately how many class members do you have? 50

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About Albacore

With over 8,000 boats worldwide the Albacore is clearly one of the most popular dinghies available today. Loaded with features, the Albacore boasts quality workmanship and strong class association support. Few centerboard sailboats available today are as versatile as the Albacore. Yacht clubs, sailing schools and community sailing clubs have long chosen the Albacore for their junior and adult training programs. In fact, many of the top sailors in North America learned to sail in an Albacore. The United States Albacore Association supports Albacore Fleets and activities throughout the country. The largest fleets are found on the east coast. Sanctioned events run from March until October. The class association provides a lot of benefits including a regularly published newsletter, seminars, regattas (including regional, national, North American, and international championships), and support of local fleets. Another benefit of a strong class associations is a strong market for used boats. The United States Albacore Association is dedicated to keeping the Albacore sailing fun and affordable.

Boats Produced:

Class boat builder(s):

Approximately how many boats are in the USA/North America?

Where is your One-Design class typically sailed in the USA? List regions of the country:

Mid-Atlantic

Does this class have a spinnaker or gennaker? No

How many people sail as a crew including the helm?  2

Ideal combined weight of range of crew:  350

Boat Designed in  1954

Length (feet/inches): 15’0″

Beam: 5’1″

Weight of rigged boat without sails: 240

Draft: 4″2″

Mast Height:

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Rigging and Tuning

The Albacore is a 4.57 m (15 ft) two-person planing dinghy, for lake and near-inshore day sailing. Hulls are made of either wood or fiberglass. The basic shape was developed in 1954 from an Uffa Fox design.

Recent boats retain the same classic dimensions, and use modern materials and modern control systems. A deep airfoil section centerboard and rudder make the Albacore highly maneuverable. The Albacore’s rig uses swept spreaders supporting a tapered mast, a powerful vang, and adjustable jib halyard and other sail controls to depower in high winds. This adjustability enables light crews and heavy crews to race head-to-head in all but the most extreme conditions.

It does not have a trapeze or spinnaker, and hence avoids the difficult handling of sport boats. The powerful rig and easily driven hull give excellent performance over a wide range of wind and wave conditions.

The detailed official specification is defined in the  Class Rules . The nominal specifications are show below.

1965 line drawing of an albacore

Overall Length 4.57 meters 15 feet 0 inches
Beam 1.55 meters 5 feet 1 inch
Minimum Hull Weight 109 kg 240 lbs
Full Rigged Weight (without people) 136 kg 299 lbs
Sail Area – Mainsail 8.4 m 90 sq ft
Sail Area – Jib 3.3 m 35 sq ft
Draft with Centerboard and Rudder Up 0.2 m 8 inches
Draft with Centerboard Down 1.3 m 4 feet 2 inches

Use these links to rig your albacore

Control Systems

  • Fly Away Whisker Pole
  • Split Tail Mainsheet
  • Centerboard Downhaul Brake
  • Vang and Jib Halyard System
  • Splicing Vectran Line
  • Upgrading Your Centerboard
  • Replacement of the Centerboard Gasket
  • Dimensions of the Hapco Milanes Albacore Centerboard

Hiking Straps

  • HAPCO Hiking Strap Assembly and Installation

Tuning Guides and Techniques

  • Switching to High Aspect Albacore Sails
  • Albacore Sail Tuning Guide for North sails General instructions on how to tune your North Sails
  • Albacore Sail Tuning Guide for MacNamara sails General instructions on how to tune your MacNamara Sails

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Identify Albacore

Wood Albacores

Grp albacores.

By Peter Duncan

This guide is to help owners of Albacores identify the builder, age and sail number of Albacores. As created, this resource focused on Albacores built and sailed in North America, UK built boats are also identified where significant numbers have been imported to North America. In time, this resource can be extended to include many UK builders as data is developed.

Rules require that the sail number of all Albacores be engraved in keel aft of centerboard case or in transom in letters at least 1 inch high. This rule did not go into effect until about 1968- boat # 2000. Boats built prior to this date may not have this identification on the hull. There are some boats built later than this point that did not comply with this rule. If a 3 or 4 digit number as described above is found in a boat, it is most likely the sail/hull number for that boat. If such a number is not found, then other means must be used to identify the boat.

Prior to boat #2000 there may be some duplication of numbers as several builders in different countries started their own numbering sequence. Boat numbers higher than 2000 should be unique regardless of country of manufacture or use.

The following are descriptions for each builder and give approximate dates and ranges for sail numbers they produced. Numbers on sails with a boat are also a good indication of the boat number, but as sails are frequently lost or purchased second hand, this is a less reliable method of identifying a boat. If you have a boat that is not pictured here, please photograph it (view of cockpit from the stern is most helpful) and send photos to webmaster [at] albacore [dot] org . We will try to identify the boat and add it to the listing.

Information sources for this document include:

Original compilation by Peter Duncan, 2004

Once you have identified your Albacore, you can add it to the class registry by clicking on the following link to Creat New Boat .

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Copyright © 2010 International Albacore Association

Buying Your First Albacore

What is you objective? What is your budget? How much are you willing to work on a boat? The Albacore can cover a wide range of needs and the particular boat you buy should match your skills and objectives.

Albacore can be rigged to be as simply as any two sail cruising sloop, or as complicated as any hot performance dinghy. This is one of the beauties of the class. The rules establish the basic parameters of the boats ensuring similar platforms for fun and fair racing, but allow owners to customize their rigs and cockpit layout to suit their skill and personal style of sailing. The class rules do not regulate the type or position of cleats, or the purchase of sail controls as many of the "mass produced" classes do.

Some people prefer simple layouts with few strings and distractions, especially when beginning to learn. Cruisers have fit their boats out with floorboards and storage compartments for distance sailing. Hot racers like to have lots of things to fiddle with to coax another ounce or two of speed from their boats when trying to win the world championship. All of this is possible with the Albacore. You can buy a basic boat and go sailing right out of the box, or you can build on the basic boat and turn it into something that fits the way you sail. All are Albacores, and all are fun.

Racing an Albacore is more about the sailor than the equipment. Great sailors can consistently sail mediocre boats at the front of the fleet in National competition. Old hulls that are well equipped with new sails can be competitive with brand new boats in all but the most challenging conditions. Beginners and poor sailors can be borrow the best boat in the fleet and find they don't increase their position more than a place or two. For the vast majority of Albacore sailors, any hull with decent spars and new sails will allow you to compete in the middle third of the fleet depending on your skills. There are some older boats, mostly those with very overweight hulls or non-tapered masts that will challenge even the best sailors to rise above the bottom third of the fleet. While these boats are limited as racing boats, they are low cost and make great day sailors or offer an affordable way to learn to sail and begin to race.

While there are plenty of exceptions, the following descriptions can be used to guide for those buying their first Albacore to find a boat that is well suited to your needs. This article focuses on boats commonly available in the North American market (there are many more types of wood boats and fewer fiberglass boats available in UK). All prices are estimated ranges based on market values in 2004. Prices are shown for boats complete with sails. New boats are priced with new sails. Used boats assume used sails with at least several seasons of use. The value of trailers, covers and other extra equipment is discussed in separate section.

Beginner or Cruiser

Beginning racer, accomplished racer, top national/international competitor, bottom cover, check list of basic equipment, check list of advanced equipment, buoyancy apparatus and safety.

Most Albacores will be fine. Even boats 30 years old are usually sound and can get you started in the class. Boats built by Grampion, Whitby, McGruer & Clark, Skene and others from 1960's and 1970's (sail numbers from 700-6300) are examples of boats that are well suited to getting you started at low cost. You can even begin racing these older boats with low level rigging, and should be able to compete in bottom third of National competition once you develop your boat handling and racing skills. New boats with simple rigging are also available. Depending on level of rigging and cosmetic condition of boat, prices for these boats (in 2004) should be in the US$400-1200 range for used boats and US$7,200 for a new boat. Of course, beginners or cruisers could also use all of the boats that follow in this list, but they will cost more and may have more sophisticated rigging that can be a distraction for those just learning the sport. See the classified section of the USAA site for a current list of boats for sale.

Things to look for in used beginner/cruising boats:

For those who are considering some racing, the following items will limit your performance:

While any boat can be raced, if you think this will be a major part of your use of the boat, look at the criteria below for a beginning racer and get as many of these features as possible.

(up to middle third of fleet) Objective at this level is learning to race sailboats. The beginning racer plans to go in local races and eventually work up to regional and national competition. They have an expectation of reaching consistent performance in middle third of the fleet, with occasional higher finishes as their skills improve.

Skene or Ontario Yachts hulls with numbers > 6800 (built from 1980's to present). Tapered mast, aerofoil shaped centerboard and rudder (not metal), sails with < 3 seasons use. Powerful (> 8:1) adjustable vang and adjustable jib halyard (> 6:1). The vang should be located for easy adjustment by the skipper while racing. The jib halyard needs to be adjustable during the race, but it need not be lead all the way to the skipper or crew position. Other equipment described for the accomplished racer is a benefit as long as it is not a distraction as you learn to race. Used boats for US$1,500-3000; new boats for about $7,500.

Things to look for in used Beginning Racer boats:

While boats missing some of these items can be refurbished or upgraded, the sale price should reflect the need for additional work to bring the boat to a competitive level.

For those who aspire to be accomplished racers, you should look for a boat that can be upgraded to reach the level described below, or assume that you will sell the beginning boat and trade up to a better platform when your skills have reached the level that the boat is the thing holding back your performance.

(consistently in to top third of fleet) This level assumes that the owner knows how to race and has an objective to enjoy competitive sailing and place consistently in the top third the fleet. The most important thing is to have a sound boat with relatively new sails (< 2-3 seasons of light use), good foils and equipment that allows the full range of adjustments to be made while underway.

Suitable hulls will generally be Ontario Yachts (with numbers > 7300). In many cases these will be hulls constructed with foam cores (most, but not all above #7352). Foam core hulls will retain stiffness longer under heavy use and tend to show a small performance edge in conditions over 18 knots or substantial chop. A few lightly used or well maintained Skene boats (6800 to 7300) can perform at this level with a skilled team and excellent tuning. Most wood boats (including those from Young, Woof, Knight and Pink, and modernized Fairey Marine) are suitable for this level.

To be competitive at the top end of the range, boats should have at least two suits of sails with the better suit having no more than two seasons of light use. Foils should be in top conditions showing minimal nicks, scratches or dings. Boats should be equipped with wide range adjustable jib halyard (˜ 12:1 with 14-18 inch travel) and powerful vang (˜ 16:1 vang that covers full range). Other sail controls (cunningham, outhaul, jib tracks, mast pre-bend, mast ram) should be sufficiently powerful and positioned so that they can be adjusted while racing. Boats should be equipped with jib stick/whisker pole. Mast and boom should be straight and free of dimples or repairs. They should also not have excessive holes from relocating fittings. Standing rigging should be in sound condition and sufficient (at least 1/8" 1 x 19 flexible wire or 3/32, 1 x 7 dyform stainless steel wire for side stays) to hold up in all racing conditions.

Used boats that meet these criteria are generally priced US$3,000 to $6,000. New boats for about $9,000.

Things to look for in used Accomplished Racer boats:

Other equipment that can be beneficial:

Objective is to be in top 10% of National or International competition. At this level you are aiming to win the event or at least place in the top five. Under the right conditions with a very skilled crew, almost any Albacore could in theory win at the National level. In practice, however, you will find most competitors will have the following equipment.

Start with a stiff and well faired hull. This usually means an Ontario Yachts foam core hull (> #7700) or a modernized wood boat (Woof, Young, Knight and Pink, Kingsfield, etc.). New or lightly used sails are essential. Spars should be in top condition. Mast should be snuggly chalked to restrict side-to-side motion, but should able to traverse the full range of fore and aft motion allowed by the rules. A system for controlling mast bend at deck (mast ram or puller/pusher) is important (and it is critical for some brands of sails). While all forms of sail adjustment are not required, most top boats will have all of these rigged and available for use as needed. Most of these controls will be lead to skipper or crew positions for easy access in all conditions, including while fully hiked out.

Boats should have excellent foils. They should be stiff, have precision aerofoil shape and mirror like finish free of all nicks and dings.

Used boats that meet these criteria are generally priced US$5,000 to $10,000. New boats for about $9,500.

Things to look for in used Top National/International Racer boats:

Trailers, Covers and Other Equipment

Most Albacores spend their shore time living on road trailers. These are used for storing boats at marinas and clubs or keeping them at home for easy transport to regattas and sailing venues. Used trailers are often very good deals and available at about half the price of a new trailer. When you can find them, you can get used trailers for about US$ 200-400. New trailers start at about US$675.

When buying a used trailer be sure to get motor vehicle information necessary to title and register the trailer. Bearings should be checked and usually replaced so you know that they have not been immersed in water (keeping wheel hubs out of water will greatly extend the life of your bearings). Electrical systems for lights on used trailers commonly need to be replaced. This is a $30-100 investment depending on whether you need lights and what type of lights you get. It can be done yourself and takes less than an hour.

Top covers keep the sun and weather off a boat. Without a top cover the gelcoat will fade in a season (or less) and the lines will become brittle and hard. Allowing water to pool in the bottom of a boat is asking for trouble. Given time water will find its way into the hull (even fibreglass hulls) and add weight to the boat and deteriorate the hull material. This is especially true if water enters and then freezes. It is critical for long boat life to keep all Albacores covered with bows tipped up at extreme angle so that all water drains out the transom without pooling. Buy a good sawhorse that will lift the tongue of the trailer 40 inches off the ground and keep boat covered to keep the inside of the boat dry.

Used top covers range from zero value to about $150 if in very good condition with < 2-3 years of outdoor use. New top covers are about US$350-400.

Bottom covers protect the boat from road grim and rocks when being transported on trailers. While not essential, they will save you hours of work scrubbing nasty stuff off the bottom of your boat before you sail. They will also protect coloured hulls from fading in the sunlight. Used bottom covers range from zero value to about $150 if in very good condition with < 2-3 years outdoors. A new bottom cover costs about US$300.

Used sails US$100-400 depending on age and use. New sails US$750-1000 depending on which brand you get.

This list is in addition to basic equipment (above). It is recommended for those sailing at "Accomplished Racer" level and virtually essential for sailing at "National Champion Level"

All hulls have positive buoyancy and won't sink. Class rules require builders to build in sufficient foam to keep a fibreglass boat afloat even if all tanks rupture. Wood boats are inherently buoyant and do not require foam.

When inspecting a fibreglass boat, be sure that the required foam is still intact. Some owners unknowingly remove this foam, especially if it gets wet or damaged and fail to replace it. Many builders sealed foam "peanuts" inside seat tanks, so it may not be obvious unless you look inside the tank.

In order for boat to be safe and pass measurement, this foam must be in place. If you find an Albacore does not have required foam, replace it with a closed cell foam that will not absorb water.

In addition to the requirement for positive foam buoyancy, the class also has a rigorous requirement for integrity of the air chambers (seats, tanks and airbags) to assure that the boats can be self-rescued in the event of a capsize. Details can be found in the class rules (link to class rules). Annual tests are required with annotation on measurement certificate to qualify a boat for racing. When purchasing a used boat, it is reasonable to review this measurement card to ascertain if the boat has recently passed the annual buoyancy requirement (measurement card should transfer to new owner with purchase of boat). If this card is not available or not current, it is reasonable to perform a buoyancy test to assure the boat does not have leaky tanks. Leaky tanks can be repaired (link to tank repair article), and details can be found elsewhere on this web site.

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Albacore insignia

Albacore is a 14 ′ 11 ″ / 4.6 m monohull sailboat designed by Greg Gregory and Uffa Fox and built by Russell Marine Ltd., Grampian Marine, Fairey Marine Ltd, Koma Boats Ltd., Gmach & Co. Ltd. (J. L. Gmach & Co.), Ovington Boats Ltd., Ontario Yachts, Lockley Newport Boats, Skene Boats Ltd., and O'Day Corp. starting in 1954.

Drawing of Albacore

Rig and Sails

Auxilary power, accomodations, calculations.

The theoretical maximum speed that a displacement hull can move efficiently through the water is determined by it's waterline length and displacement. It may be unable to reach this speed if the boat is underpowered or heavily loaded, though it may exceed this speed given enough power. Read more.

Classic hull speed formula:

Hull Speed = 1.34 x √LWL

Max Speed/Length ratio = 8.26 ÷ Displacement/Length ratio .311 Hull Speed = Max Speed/Length ratio x √LWL

Sail Area / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the power of the sails relative to the weight of the boat. The higher the number, the higher the performance, but the harder the boat will be to handle. This ratio is a "non-dimensional" value that facilitates comparisons between boats of different types and sizes. Read more.

SA/D = SA ÷ (D ÷ 64) 2/3

Ballast / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the stability of a boat's hull that suggests how well a monohull will stand up to its sails. The ballast displacement ratio indicates how much of the weight of a boat is placed for maximum stability against capsizing and is an indicator of stiffness and resistance to capsize.

Ballast / Displacement * 100

Displacement / Length Ratio

A measure of the weight of the boat relative to it's length at the waterline. The higher a boat’s D/L ratio, the more easily it will carry a load and the more comfortable its motion will be. The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more.

D/L = (D ÷ 2240) ÷ (0.01 x LWL)³

Comfort Ratio

This ratio assess how quickly and abruptly a boat’s hull reacts to waves in a significant seaway, these being the elements of a boat’s motion most likely to cause seasickness. Read more.

Comfort ratio = D ÷ (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x Beam 1.33 )

Capsize Screening Formula

This formula attempts to indicate whether a given boat might be too wide and light to readily right itself after being overturned in extreme conditions. Read more.

CSV = Beam ÷ ³√(D / 64)

A development of the original Fairey Marine SWORDFISH. The ALBACORE has remained one of the most active classes in the world well into the 21st century.

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US Albacore Association

US Albacore Association

Replacement of the centerboard gasket.

By Rolf Zeisler 7378 and Barney Harris 6701 & 8011

Why this article? Barney made me write it as the price for the loaner boat I used at the WRSC Azalea Cup. He is also the technical reviewer and co-author of this note. Anyway, a small price to pay considering the couple of rub marks 7526 has suffered and which Barney will make invisible again; and Sue and I had a good time sailing with some really great moments, until we got bitten by the foreign layout of the lines in the boats. What does this all have to do with the centerboard gasket on Cool Runnings? A lot, when the boat was not ready for the regatta.

In early April, Barney held a class at his house on boat maintenance, with the subject of demonstration and active participation being “Replacement of the Centreboard Gasket”. An easy project if you are prepared as Barney was. In fact, it all worked like in one of those cooking shows where a 2-hour preparation time is compressed into 10 minutes. That’s about the ratio I found between the demonstration and the actual performance of the tasks. Now, I hope that the reader will not be scared away from a beneficial maintenance project by the time frame. I hope that this article will help to keep control over the total project time and encourage use of “Barney’s Rule”, which requires that you spend at least 30 minutes with your boat every day as long as the project takes, even if you only stand there with a beer and think about the project for the 30 minutes.

Now to the project. It helps if you can get rid of all the stuff in your garage and reserve the space for your boat, where she will be upside down, nice and dry.

To be set, get the following materials:

Step 1: Removal of old gasket

Did you already take out your centerboard? Yes! Good, we continue with removing the Aluminum strips that hold the gaskets in place. This is probably an easier task with all Phillips head screws. In my case, one of the slit screw heads was damaged. I got the screw out a day later after carefully re-grooving the head with a newly-purchased Dremel tool flex shaft extension. Save the screws. Make sure that you don’t bend the metal strips, and keep track of where they came from, i.e., port/starboard & bow/aft end, since the fasteners are not necessarily positioned symmetrically.

Step 2: Clean-up

Sand the aluminum strips to the base metal. Spray paint with Zn/Cr for corrosion protection. Set aside to let dry. Remove all the grit and old sealant from the groove in the centerboard capping. Repair any cracks in the groove with epoxy filler. Clean all with acetone.

Step 3: Set the new gasket

Put a bead of marine sealant in the corner of the groove around the centerboard slot. Lay in one gasket strip with its stiffened edge flush to the outboard edge of the groove. The strip should extend a couple of inches beyond the centerboard slot on both sides. Tape it in place on the ends. Lay in the painted aluminum strip and start fastening it in the middle. Dip the screw into marine sealant and press it through its hole in the strip and the gasket material into its original hole, and tighten. From this, work your way to the front and to the back. Make sure that the gasket maintains contact with the outboard edge of the slot. Repeat this on the opposite side. When both strips are set, trim the front straight across to fit into the front of the slot. Cap with its short aluminum strip. On the aft end, use a 45 ° cut to achieve a 1 inch long V-shaped opening into the actual centerboard slot. Cap with the short strip or leave open. This all happens well within the working time of the sealant. Go away now and have a beer.

Step 4: Finishing up

Barney didn’t demo this. After all is cured, remove excess sealant with the utility knife or razor blade. I found this to be a much easier task in the areas where I took action the day before and removed most of the excess before curing. Re-insert the centerboard and be amazed how smoothly the new gasket hugs your board.

While you are doing this project, you have plenty of opportunity to look at your boat. Go by Barney’s Rule, spend some time with her and extend your maintenance plan to other needy areas or make this long-deferred adjustment to your running rigging – and do a little every day, or you might miss the next regatta!

Albacore Sailing Dinghy. Racing, cruising, or learning to sail it's the boat for you!

IMAGES

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VIDEO

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COMMENTS

  1. The Complete Guide to Albacore Sailing

    The Albacore is a great boat for racing. It's rounded hull sections, deep airfoil centerboard and rudder make the Albacore exceptionally manoeuvrable - a roll tacking machine. The powerful, rig and easily driven hull give excellent performance over a wide range of conditions. The Albacore will handily outperform other similar two person ...

  2. Upgrading Your Centerboard

    Clamp the board by its handle in a vise with the leading edge facing up. Gently heat the board for a day or so with spot lights to elevate its temp about 10 deg above ambient. Remove the lights and paint the board with epoxy resin. Allow the board to cool while the epoxy is applied.

  3. ALBACORE

    Centerboard Dinghy: Rigging Type: Fractional Sloop: LOA: 15.00 ft / 4.57 m: LWL: ... The ALBACORE has remained one of the most active classes in the world well into the 21st century. ... Kelsall Sailing Performance (KSP): Another measure of relative speed potential of a boat. It takes into consideration "reported" sail area, displacement ...

  4. The Boat

    The Albacore is a 4.57 m (15 ft) two-person planing dinghy, for lake and near-inshore day sailing. Hulls are made of either wood or fiberglass. The basic shape was developed in 1954 from an Uffa Fox design. Recent boats retain the same classic dimensions, and use modern materials and modern control systems. A deep airfoil section centerboard ...

  5. Albacore sailboat rudders and centerboards

    Albacore Custom Centerboard. A very stiff layup of s-glass over sitka spruce, with a drag reducing planform. Thickness and layup can be adjusted to your individual needs. For an even lighter board with more feel, request a red cedar core. ... (boat control!) in a more efficient package than our basic rectangular blade. The elliptical leading ...

  6. ALBACORE TUNING GUIDE

    Boat Set-Up: Foils. The basic hull and foil set up is similar for most Albacore builders and sails. Typically the centerboard is moved as far aft in the boat as the rule allows. The minimum allowable distance from the transom to the leading edge of the centerboard when lowered 90° to the hull is 2600 mm measured along the curve of the hull.

  7. Home

    Whatever your priority, the Albacore is the right choice for you! With over 8,000 boats worldwide the Albacore is clearly one of the most popular dinghies available today. Loaded with features, the Albacore boasts quality workmanship and strong class association support. Few centerboard sailboats available today are as versatile as the Albacore.

  8. Albacore

    About Albacore. With over 8,000 boats worldwide the Albacore is clearly one of the most popular dinghies available today. Loaded with features, the Albacore boasts quality workmanship and strong class association support. Few centerboard sailboats available today are as versatile as the Albacore. Yacht clubs, sailing schools and community ...

  9. Rigging and Tuning

    The Boat. The Albacore is a 4.57 m (15 ft) two-person planing dinghy, for lake and near-inshore day sailing. Hulls are made of either wood or fiberglass. ... A deep airfoil section centerboard and rudder make the Albacore highly maneuverable. The Albacore's rig uses swept spreaders supporting a tapered mast, a powerful vang, and adjustable ...

  10. Centerboard question

    Hi Folks, I'm seeking opinions and advice from the experience and wisdom of my fellow Albacore sailors. I'm stripping off the paint from my Centerboard to discover a nice laminated board but I have discovered that the cheeks of the board (the area that stays inside the casing) are slightly different thicknesses. i.e. one side is further from the centerline of the blade than the other.

  11. Albacore Line Drawing and Specifications

    Albacore Specifications. Portsmouth Rating: 90.7. The Albacore is a lightweight, planing dinghy. Sloop rigged with main and 3/4 height jib, the Albacore is typically raced with a crew of two, but the cockpit has room for day sailing with up to 4 adults. A pivoting centerboard and kick up rudder allow for easy use in shallow or weed-laden waters.

  12. Albacore Sail Tuning Guide

    Boat Set-Up: Foils. The basic hull and foil set up is similar for most Albacore builders and sails. Typically the centerboard is moved as far aft in the boat as the rule allows. The minimum allowable distance from the transom to the leading edge of the centerboard when lowered 90° to the hull is 2600 mm measured along the curve of the hull.

  13. What Is An Albacore?

    The real proof is in the sailing. While the Albacore is a fast and lively boat, it is relatively easy to get up to speed and the racing is very tactical. Albacore class members comprise an eclectic group from all ages and walks of life including students, professionals, senior executives, and retirees who range in age from 15 to 71.

  14. Fairey Marine

    Boat Number Range: 1-700 Date: 1954-1964? ... Full width centerboard slots originally fit with steel centerboard (˜60 lbs). Fairey Marine Mk 1 Albacore #86- under restoration in 2001. About 75 boats shipped to North America. Original shipment to Hyannisport, MA in 1957: #260-275. A few older boats were also shipped to Toronto, Canada for use ...

  15. Albacore (dinghy)

    An Albacore dinghy planing Albacore racing fleet rounding the windward mark. The Albacore is a 4.57 m (15 ft) two-person planing dinghy with fractional sloop rig, for competitive racing and lake and near-inshore day sailing. Hulls are made of either wood or fiberglass. The basic shape was developed in 1954 from an Uffa Fox design, the Swordfish. Recent boats retain the same classic dimensions ...

  16. Rigging

    Dimensions of the Hapco Milanes Albacore Centerboard. ... Email [email protected]. Fleet Locations Galesville, MD Gloucester, VA Redbank, NJ Washington, DC . Email Broadcast List Signup. Email address: Leave this field empty if you're human: Schedule. Albacore Sailing Dinghy. Racing, cruising, or learning to sail it's the boat for you!

  17. Identify Albacore

    Rules require that the sail number of all Albacores be engraved in keel aft of centerboard case or in transom in letters at least 1 inch high. This rule did not go into effect until about 1968- boat # 2000. Boats built prior to this date may not have this identification on the hull. There are some boats built later than this point that did not ...

  18. Buying Your First Albacore

    The Albacore can cover a wide range of needs and the particular boat you buy should match your skills and objectives. Albacore can be rigged to be as simply as any two sail cruising sloop, or as complicated as any hot performance dinghy. This is one of the beauties of the class. The rules establish the basic parameters of the boats ensuring ...

  19. Albacore

    Albacore is a 4.6 m monohull sailboat designed by Uffa Fox and Greg Gregory and built by Fairey Marine Ltd, Grampian Marine, O'Day Corp., Russell Marine Ltd., Ontario Yachts, Ovington Boats Ltd., Lockley Newport Boats, Gmach & Co. Ltd. (J. L. Gmach & Co.), Skene Boats Ltd., and Koma Boats Ltd. starting in 1954. Designers. Uffa Fox. Greg Gregory.

  20. US Albacore Association

    Loaded with features, the Albacore boasts quality workmanship and strong class association support. Few centerboard sailboats available today are as versatile as the Albacore. Yacht clubs, sailing schools and community sailing clubs have long chosen the Albacore for their junior and adult training programs.

  21. Wondering if anyone can help me identify this boat. Looking to ...

    17 votes, 20 comments. 179K subscribers in the sailing community. /r/Sailing is a place to ask about, share, show, and enjoy all about sailing, sail…

  22. Replacement of the Centerboard Gasket

    Step 3: Set the new gasket. Put a bead of marine sealant in the corner of the groove around the centerboard slot. Lay in one gasket strip with its stiffened edge flush to the outboard edge of the groove. The strip should extend a couple of inches beyond the centerboard slot on both sides. Tape it in place on the ends.