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Leonardo DiCaprio traveled on gas-guzzling private jets, yachts while funding climate nuisance lawsuits

Dicaprio funded climate lawsuits while on gas-guzzling trips across globe.

Thomas Catenacci

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Leonardo DiCaprio traveled across the world on gas-guzzling private jets and embarked on long yacht trips while his foundation quietly funded climate change lawsuits levied against Big Oil.

DiCaprio, a famous actor and climate activist, has embarked on multiple fossil fuel-powered trips over the last several years while pushing for extreme measures to combat climate change, according to multiple reports. The Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation, which the actor founded in the late 1990s, awarded grants to a fund that in turn backed a private law firm's efforts to hold oil companies liable for climate change.

"I'm not surprised," Steve Milloy, a former energy official on the Trump administration's transition team, told Fox News Digital. "There's this whole left-wing dark money network. That money comes from someplace and these guys — high profile, wealthy lefties — are funding it."

"There's not a single climate activist who is not a complete hypocrite about all this," Milloy added. "Everything they do is just total hypocrisy. I would say they have no self awareness, but they just don't care. All this is really meant to control us, not for them to control themselves."

LEONARDO DICAPRIO FUNNELED GRANTS THROUGH DARK MONEY GROUP TO FUND CLIMATE NUISANCE LAWSUITS, EMAILS SHOW

Leonardo DiCaprio speaks at the 2019 Global Citizen Festival in Central Park on Saturday, Sept. 28, 2019, in New York. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP)

Leonardo DiCaprio speaks at the 2019 Global Citizen Festival in Central Park on Saturday, Sept. 28, 2019, in New York. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP) (Charles Sykes/Invision/AP)

DiCaprio's past fuel-powered travels included six roundtrip trips on private jets over the course of just six weeks in 2014. Sony Pictures Studios arranged for DiCaprio to take a private jet from California to New York during the period between April and May 2014, according to internal Sony emails published by WikiLeaks in 2015 .

The United Nations appointed DiCaprio as a "messenger of peace" for his work on climate change in 2014. 

CLIMATE ACTIVISTS EMBRACE EXTREME TACTICS, VIOLENCE AS DEADLINE TO 'SAVE THE PLANET' DRAWS NEAR

In 2016, DiCaprio reportedly flew 8,000 miles via private jet from Europe to New York City to accept an award for his environmental activism. He then returned to Europe for a charity event.

That same year, DiCaprio took a private jet to the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos, Switzerland. At the summit, the WEF gave DiCaprio its Crystal Award for his "leadership in tackling the climate crisis."

Leonardo DiCaprio is pictured jet-skiing in St. Tropez on July 15. (Mega Agency)

Leonardo DiCaprio is pictured jet-skiing in St. Tropez on July 15. (Mega Agency) (Mega Agency)

DiCaprio has also been heavily criticized for his wide usage of private yachts . In 2014, he took a yacht owned by United Arab Emirates deputy prime minister Sheikh Mansour bin Zayed Al Nahyan to the World Cup in Brazil.

In July, DiCaprio was pictured in St. Tropez on a yacht and jet-skiing with other celebrities. 

After DiCaprio criticized Brazil over its reported deforestation plans, the nation's president Jair Bolsonaro slammed the actor, pointing to his usage of private yachts . 

"You again, Leo?" Bolsonaro tweeted on July 27. "This way, you will become my best electoral cable, as we say in Brazil! I could tell you, again, to give up your yacht before lecturing the world, but I know progressives: you want to change the entire world but never yourselves, so I will let you off the hook."

Still, DiCaprio has continued to use his platform and foundation to push for a clean energy transition away from fossil fuels. After receiving the "best actor" prize at the 2016 Academy Awards, DiCaprio used his speech to urge world leaders to make aggressive actions to fight climate change.

"Climate change is real," DiCaprio remarked during the speech. "It is happening right now. It’s the most urgent threat facing our entire species and we need to work collectively together and stop procrastinating."

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"We need to support leaders around the world who do not speak for the big polluters, but who speak for all of humanity, for the indigenous people of the world, for the billions and billions of underprivileged people out there who would be most affected by this," he continued.

The Earth Alliance, which DiCaprio's foundation joined in 2019, didn't respond to a request for comment.

Thomas Catenacci is a politics writer for Fox News Digital.

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  • celebrities

Why You Should Care About Celebrities’ Climate Hypocrisy

Private airplane with red carpet

F or years, outrage over the high-carbon consumption of the rich and famous in the face of climate change has stirred passionate outrage and accusations of hypocrisy, from Leonardo DiCaprio’s private jet rides to Bill Gates’s yacht. This summer the outrage has hit a fever pitch .

First, social media buzzed over reports of wild private jet usage—celebrities taking flights so short that they could have driven in less than an hour—and, later, with a report of almost-comical water usage violations in a part of California experiencing drought. Article after article jumped on these stories to point out just how badly these behaviors harm the planet and everyone who lives on it. On a per passenger basis, private jets pollute as much as 14 times more than their commercial counterparts, for example, and the Los Angeles community where these celebrities live is currently limiting outdoor watering to once per week. Celebrities, it might follow, are a key villain in the climate challenge.

And yet, while it’s certainly true that individual celebrities are responsible for a disproportionate share of emissions, their behavior represents a tiny part of the problem when you crunch the numbers. Private jets, for example, account for only about 2% of emissions from the aviation industry; the aviation sector more broadly accounts for about 2% of global emissions. Meanwhile, the celebrities listed in the drought report represented just a handful of the more than 2,000 customers in that part of Los Angeles who violated the rule.

But that doesn’t mean their behavior doesn’t matter. A quick review of the surprisingly robust academic research on celebrities and climate change suggests that there’s another, arguably more important, reason why the public should be outraged: celebrities shape what everyone else does. That’s true for what products we buy, obviously, but it’s also true for how seriously the public and even policymakers take climate change.

Climate change touches everything, and the robust body of academic work reflects that broad influence—including research on the impact of celebrity behavior. A 2017 review of the academic work on this intersection published by Oxford University Press recounts how famous people became central spokespeople in the fight to tackle climate change. Celebrities have spoken publicly about climate change for decades, but the research shows that they moved to the center of the effort to reduce emissions in the early 2000s.

A number of factors explain why environmental groups increasingly sought out celebrity endorsements at that time. For one, many climate policy efforts were lagging and celebrities helped explain a seemingly wonky issue in a way scientists may have struggled to do. The approach of partnering with celebrities also reflected the changing business of journalism. Celebrities helped climate news spread online, but also grabbed the attention of print and broadcast journalists competing with the web.

The 2017 research suggests that celebrities offered a key asset that scientists couldn’t: telling followers how to feel. When DiCaprio travels the world visiting different sites relevant to climate change in the documentary Before the Flood , his reactions—angry, sad, passionate, etc.—tell the audience what emotions they should experience. And that matters because committed followers tend to listen. A 2020 study in the journal Sustainability found that audiences who felt a connection to a certain celebrity did adapt their attitudes and behaviors in response. Celebrities play a different role in elite circles, researchers say. When DiCaprio speaks at the United Nations or to a CEO at a cocktail party, he is effectively representing his followers to the policymakers and business leaders with actual power. It’s safe to say that the ability to sway public attitudes and influence policymakers is far more consequential in the climate battle than the emissions from a private jet ride.

So how does all this research apply to the examples of celebrity consumption today? Admittedly, the research primarily looks at examples of celebrities promoting climate initiatives—not polluting too much. Still, there are some valuable lessons that can be extrapolated.

The private jet hubbub is easiest to understand. In late July, we learned some truly wild statistics about celebrity private jet habits. Taylor Swift’s private jet had taken off some 170 times between January and late July, according to an analysis from sustainability marketing firm Yard. Floyd Mayweather’s jet flew 177 trips in the same time period, including a 10-minute flight between two airports in the Las Vegas area. Celebrities aren’t necessarily advertising those numbers, but they do post photos glamorizing their flights as part of the celebrity lifestyle. If the primary role of celebrities when it comes to climate change is telling us how to feel, the message is clear: the public should feel that conspicuous consumption is desirable no matter the climate implications.

The drought example is more interesting. A report in the Los Angeles Times found that some of the biggest names in Hollywood, including Sylvester Stallone, Dwyane Wade, Kevin Hart, and Kim Kardashian—had flouted drought restrictions at their properties, some exceeding their water allowances by comical proportions. Dwyane Wade’s property, for example, exceeded his allotted water budget by 489,000 gallons in May.

A fan who extrapolates from this report would think that not only do these celebrities not care about climate change, but they also signal that the policies to address it are frivolous and that they can be ignored. This is a worrying signal as policies aimed at tackling climate change will increasingly push changes in behavior—from fees on driving made to incentivize public transit to restrictions on water usage. If celebrities don’t accept these changes, how will the public?

That question has gained consideration in France where a movement has sprouted to crack down on the carbon-intensive lifestyles of the rich and famous—namely their private jet usage. The French transportation minister has called for restrictions on private jets, citing their climate impact. The justification though isn’t about the emissions implications of those flight—which are small in the scheme of things—but rather the signal that private jets send to the public.

The French economist Lucas Chancel explained it clearly: “If the super polluters have big exemptions, it will be complicated to ask the French to make efforts.” Indeed, if highly-visible celebrities won’t accept climate policy, the public probably won’t either.

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Leonardo DiCaprio accused of being an 'eco hypocrite' as he holidays on £110million yacht

Vocal climate change ambassador Leonardo DiCaprio has been accused of hypocrisy after being pictured relaxing on a super yacht while holidaying in St Barts

Leonardo DiCaprio

  • 15:53, 9 Jan 2022
  • Updated 10:09, 10 Jan 2022

Leonardo DiCaprio has been accused of being an eco-hypocrite as he was pictured on board an environmentally unfriendly superyacht during his holiday to St Barts.

The Titanic star, 47, is a celebrity UN climate change ambassador, and has openly called the issue of climate change to be ‘the most urgent threat facing our entire species’.

He's urged his fans to take action to combat climate change, with his recent role on Netflix hit Don't Look Up bringing more attention to the cause.

Despite his stance on this, he spent some time enjoying the luxuries of the the 315ft, £110 million Vava II superyacht - which produces as much carbon from sailing seven miles as the average car produces in a year - during his latest jaunt abroad.

The Vava II has six desks, with a helipad on the uppermost and costs a staggering £250,000 to fill its fuel tanks.

Alongside his 24-year-old girlfriend Camila Morrone, Leonardo, 47, has been holidaying near the 'playground for the world's billionaires' island St Barts in the Caribbean, since New Year's Eve.

The couple were seen together on the Vava II superyacht - the largest yacht to be manufactured in Britain - with friends, with the huge yacht being own by Swiss pharmaceutical billionaire Ernesto Bertarelli, 46.

With a gym, swimming pool, cinema and 'beach club' on board, the superyacht doesn't hold back from luxury.

The manufacturer of the yacht has said that it can hold 30 crew members and 22 guests and when filled with 523,000 litres of fuel it can travel over 5,000 nautical miles.

Leonardo and his girlfriend of five years headed into the New Year alongside celebrity friends at a Unicef gala - the guest list of the exclusive evening included singer Dua Lipa, Amazon founder Jeff Bezos and boxer Mike Tyson .

Since the New Year celebration, Leonardo and Camila - the stepdaughter of Scarface star Al Pacino - have been seen enjoying time on St Barts beaches before returning to the superyacht of an evening.

It is estimated that the superyacht produces 238kg of carbon dioxide per mile - which is the same amount as an average British car would emit over the span of two months.

The Daily Mail reports that shop tracking websites have revealed the yacht to be mostly stationary, with it not travelling further than a mile a day.

Although Leonardo is being perceived by some as hypocritical for indulging in time aboard a superyacht when he is a vocal advocate for climate change, an environmentalist has leapt to Leo's defence.

Sarah Clayton, who has campaigned against airport expansions in Britain in the past, said: "I know celebrities lead these crazy lives, but Don’t Look Up has done so much to make people aware of climate change."

The actor is believed to have given £75 million of his £200 million fortune to global conservation projects in order to protect endangered species and land from developers.

It is reported that last night a source close to the actor said that was one of many guests on the yacht and that he does not own the vessel and also has not rented it.

The Mirror has reached out to Leonardo's representative for comment.

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leonardo dicaprio yacht climate change

The Pollution From Leonardo DiCaprio's Superyacht Is One Of Many Reasons He's Been Labeled An "Eco-Hypocrite"

  • Leonardo DiCaprio is a dedicated and vocal environmental activist, having funneled millions of dollars into conservation efforts and using his platform to advocate for climate change action.
  • Despite his activism, DiCaprio has faced backlash for his lavish vacations on multi-million-dollar superyachts and excessive private plane travel, raising questions about the consistency of his environmental principles.
  • Fans are struggling to reconcile DiCaprio's strong stance against carbon emissions and support for a sustainable economy with his own luxurious and carbon-intensive lifestyle.

Leonardo DiCaprio , one of Hollywood’s most revered leading men, is known for many things; one of which is being a particularly vocal environmental activist. The now 48-year-old has funneled huge chunks of his massive $300 million net worth into environmental conservation efforts over the years, proving that his activism goes beyond mere words.

Ironically, DiCaprio recently found himself embroiled in a wave of controversy after snapshots of him vacationing in a multi-million-dollar superyacht started making rounds on the internet. But this isn’t the first time the Don’t Look Up star has been caught on the wrong side of the climate change debate.

The now 48-year-old’s work-hard-party-hard lifestyle has seen him jet-set to various exclusive locales around the globe, often in luxurious fuel-guzzling private planes. With such sharp contrasts between his lifestyle and ideologies , one question remains; Is DiCaprio an environmental champion or an eco-hypocrite?

Leonardo DiCaprio Is An Avid Environmental Activist

Aside from being one of Hollywood’s most bankable movie stars, and dating well below his age, Academy Award winner Leonardo DiCaprio has made a name for himself as one of the most dedicated and vocal environmental activists in Hollywood.

The Titanic star’s climate change crusade first started in 1998, when he launched the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation, which prior to its 2019 merger with Emmerson Collective and Global Wildlife Conservation to form Earth Alliance, had funneled over $100 million in grant funding to global projects aimed at averting climate change and biodiversity loss.

Apart from doting out large chunks of his net worth to the climate change crusade, DiCaprio has also used his platform to advocate for environmental conservation, with a Buzzfeed article from 2022 tallying at least 17 times the acclaimed actor has publicly spoken out about climate change.

As a testament to his dedication to averting a climate change catastrophe, DiCaprio was designated a UN Messenger of Peace in 2014; earning the rare privilege to address world leaders at the annual United Nations Climate Summit.

“Every week, we’re seeing new and undeniable climate events, evidence that accelerated climate change is here right now," he said at the time. "Droughts are intensifying, our oceans are acidifying with methane plumes rising up from the ocean floor. We are seeing extreme weather events, and the West Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets melting at unprecedented rates, decades ahead of scientific projections."

RELATED: Leonardo DiCaprio's Worst Film Of All-Time Got Reviews That Should've Ended His Career

The now 48-year-old even managed to work a call to action against climate change into his Oscar acceptance speech at the 2016 Academy Awards. “Climate change is real, it is happening right now, it is the most urgent threat facing our entire species, and we need to work collectively together and stop procrastinating,” he said.

“We need to support leaders around the world who do not speak for the big polluters or the big corporations, but who speak for all of humanity, for the Indigenous peoples of the world, for the billions and billions of underprivileged people who will be most affected by this, for our children's children, and for those people out there whose voices have been drowned out by the politics of greed.”

Leonardo DiCaprio Faced Backlash For Vacationing In A Superyacht

Despite being an avid environmental activist, Leonardo DiCaprio doesn't exactly engage in environmentally conscious pastimes. The now 48-year-old recently found himself making waves on the internet as snapshots of his lavish vacation in the picturesque Italian island of Ibiza aboard a multi-million-dollar superyacht surfaced. And that's not all! Just a week earlier, he was spotted alongside Spider-Man star Tobey Maguire, cruising in style on yet another yacht in the glamorous Saint-Tropez.

But Leonardo's jet-setting adventures didn't end there. Two weeks before his South of France trip, the now 48-year-old was caught on camera enjoying a family getaway along the stunning Amalfi Coast. And as if that wasn't enough, back in May, the Titanic star was seen basking in the sun on yet another luxurious superyacht; this time off the coast of Sardinia, Italy.

RELATED: Why Does Leonardo DiCaprio Own 4 Mansions Right Next To Each Other? The Truth About His Insanely Expensive Real Estate Choices

The Titanic star's superyacht getaways have become a hot topic, igniting debates on the harmony between ideology and lifestyle, according to The Daily Mail. For many, these lavish vacations cast a grim shadow over DiCaprio's fervent advocacy against carbon emissions, raising questions about the consistency of his environmental principles.

Leonardo DiCaprio Has Come Under Fire For Being An Eco Hypocrite In The Past

Surprisingly, the grandiose summer vacation isn’t the first of DiCaprio’s lavish trips to ignite controversy. Back in 2022, the Titanic star took a luxurious vacation to St. Barts aboard a $121 million superyacht , which, according to Mirror UK, can emit as much carbon as an average car in a year by sailing just seven miles.

Aside from lounging in superyachts, DiCaprio has also faced backlash for his penchant for traveling in luxurious private jets. Back in 2016, the Titanic star embarked on an 8000-mile trip from Europe to New York in a private jet, all in the name of accepting an award for environmental activism; an irony that did not go unnoticed.

In addition, according to Mirror UK, the Don’t Look Up star has racked up over 12,000 miles of air travel jet-setting between the US, London, Milan, and Paris in private planes over recent months; a startling figure considering that flying private results in a significantly higher carbon footprint than flying commercial.

RELATED: Was Claire Danes So Determined Not To Work With Leonardo DiCaprio Again That She Turned Down One Of The Highest Grossing Movies Of All Time?

As things stand, fans are finding it hard to reconcile the environmentally conscious UN Peace Ambassador who, while attending the 2014 United Nations Climate Summit said, “We need to put a price tag on carbon emissions and eliminate government subsidies for oil, coal, and gas companies. We need to end the free ride that industrial polluters have been given in the name of a free-market economy. They do not deserve our tax dollars, they deserve our scrutiny. For the economy itself will die if our ecosystems collapse," with the multi-millionaire who routinely lounges in fuel-guzzling superyachts and travels thousands of miles in private planes.

The Pollution From Leonardo DiCaprio's Superyacht Is One Of Many Reasons He's Been Labeled An "Eco-Hypocrite"

Rich climate activist Leonardo DiCaprio lives a carbon-intensive lifestyle, and that's (mostly) fine

by David Roberts

leonardo dicaprio yacht climate change

At the 2016 Academy Awards, Leo DiCaprio accepted his Best Actor trophy with a speech that included a passionate call to action on climate change.

As inevitably as night follows day, social media was flooded with people attacking DiCaprio as a hypocrite for living a carbon-intensive lifestyle.

@drvox @ClimateOfGavin pic.twitter.com/z4ugiZoXzl — Politics In Memes (@politicsinmemes) February 29, 2016

( UPDATE: This yacht doesn't belong to DiCaprio. He doesn't own one. See correction at bottom.)

This kind of thing has been around for as long as I've been writing about climate change. People never tire of pointing out that Al Gore lives in a "mansion" or that scientists fly all over the world to climate conferences, spewing CO2. Any time I mention a vacation online I am immediately scolded as a hypocrite by at least one of the trolls who follow me around waiting for such opportunities.

It's not just conservatives or climate skeptics, either. There have always been plenty of environmentalists and liberals who scorn Gore and other climate leaders for their supposed hypocrisy.

There's clearly something powerful in the critique. It elicits strong, intuitive reactions, which is rare with arguments related to climate change.

But I don't think it holds up. In particular, I think it runs two different arguments together.

Argument 1: Climate advocates who don't reduce their emissions are hypocrites

This is the claim that really grabs people at a gut level. And it makes a certain sense: If you say carbon emissions are bad, and you emit lots of carbon, and you don't work to reduce your own carbon emissions, then either a) you don't really think carbon emissions are bad, or b) you're a hypocrite.

But there's a hidden premise here, which lots of people take for granted but shouldn't. The premise is that personal emission reductions are an important part of the fight against climate change — if you take climate seriously, you take on an obligation to reduce your own emissions.

Is that true? Not necessarily. It is entirely possible to believe, as many people do, that voluntary emission reductions are pointless vanity, that the only efficacious solutions to climate change involve extended, coordinated action by governments. They view the moralism around personal emissions as a distraction, a way of diverting environmentalist energy and alienating non-environmentalists.

leonardo dicaprio yacht climate change

People who believe that are not engaged in hypocrisy if they fly, or buy an SUV, or eat a hamburger. They are not advocating sacrifice or asceticism; they don't believe it would do any good. They believe people will take advantage of the options available to them until some combination of regulation and innovation makes cleaner options available.

If they advocate for, and are willing to abide by, taxes and regulations designed to reduce emissions, then such folks are being true to their beliefs. You might think they are wrong about the value of personal behavior, but they are not hypocrites .

Is there any evidence that DiCaprio has advocated personal emission reductions or told anyone they ought to forgo planes or boats? If so, I haven't seen it.

Perhaps he has done the math and realized that the emissions of any single rich person are insignificant to the big picture on climate.

Here are the per capita carbon emissions of the world's top 10 overall carbon emitters:

leonardo dicaprio yacht climate change

More recent data has shifted slightly, but we don't need to be all that precise. The world average is around 7 metric tons a year per person. In the US, it's around 20 metric tons.

Let's say that by flying and yachting all over the world, DiCaprio is responsible for 500 times the emissions of the average American — 10,000 metric tons of greenhouse gases a year.

How much is that? Here are some annual greenhouse gas emission figures, in metric tons (years range from 2010 to 2013):

  • Global: 46 billion
  • US: 6.673 billion
  • California: 459.3 million
  • Walmart: 21 million
  • Los Angeles: 18.595 million
  • California film industry: 8.4 million

Even if extravagant by mere mortal standards, DiCaprio's personal emissions are a fart in the wind when it comes to climate change. If he vanished tomorrow, and all his emissions with him, the effect on global temperature, even on US emissions, even on film-industry emissions, would be lost in the noise.

Climate change is extremely large. No single human can directly generate enough emissions to make a dent. And all indications are that DiCaprio knows that. That's why he said:

We need to support leaders around the world who do not speak for the big polluters, but who speak for all of humanity, for the indigenous people of the world, for the billions and billions of underprivileged people out there who would be most affected by this.

He didn't say, "We need to buy LED lightbulbs. And avoid yachts." His focus is on political leadership.

So the "hypocrisy" charge fails. You're not a hypocrite for not doing things you haven't said anyone else should do either.

leonardo dicaprio yacht climate change

(Note: There are certainly people who think reducing one's personal emissions is a moral obligation, for everyone, and that high-profile climate leaders ought to lead the way. I disagree, but it's a legitimate claim. But even if you accept the claim, the conclusion is that DiCaprio is wrong , not that he's a hypocrite.)

Argument 2: Public figures ought to do more climate signaling

You could agree that voluntary personal emission reductions are irrelevant to the big picture on climate change and still think that high-profile public figures like DiCaprio are in a unique position to signal . Their choices and habits have outsize effects on culture. People look to them for indications about what is and isn't important, so they have an obligation to send the right signals.

There's definitely something to this argument. But there are two important things to remember about it.

First, if signaling is the issue, well, DiCaprio is supporting electric cars and pushing for clean energy in the film industry and building eco-resorts and supporting clean energy campaigns and starting a friggin' climate charity . Oh, and making heartfelt appeals in front of 9 million people at the Academy Awards.

That's a lot of signaling! Read this piece in Rolling Stone or this one in the Guardian. DiCaprio has a long history of serious work on this issue. By any measure, he's doing better on signaling than the vast majority of wealthy, influential people.

Do pictures of him on a yacht undo all that? No one's provided any evidence to support that claim.

leonardo dicaprio yacht climate change

Second, note that this argument applies to all wealthy, influential people, not just the ones who advocate for action on climate change. If it is a moral good for influential people to signal that low carbon is a priority, then it is a moral good for all of them. Those who speak up about climate change are under no special obligation over and above that.

All that said, yes, conspicuous consumption is a kind of signaling too — a bad kind, for reasons that go far beyond climate change. Generally, parading your hyperconsumption is corrosive to social solidarity. (Oddly, very few of the conservatives who yell at DiCaprio make this argument.)

So if there's any grounds for complaint against DiCaprio, it's the same complaint fairly directed at any wealthy hyperconsumer: Signaling restraint is a gesture of social solidarity. They should all do more of it. Including the ones who never say a word about climate change.

We've got to stop using fossil fuels as rapidly as possible. Doing that will mean some mix of technological, political, and social change. Undoubtedly lifestyle changes will come along with any such transition.

I wouldn't presume to predict what those lifestyle changes will be. But insofar as progress on decarbonization proceeds at the pace it needs to, it will do so because lower-carbon alternatives are cheaper or more convenient, or offer features and benefits their dirty competitors can't.

I have trouble envisioning voluntary restraint catching on at any scale that makes a difference. Cleaner energy will be more fun, more prosperous, better , or it won't happen.

So sure, maybe DiCaprio ought to rein it in with the yachts and personal jets. But only for the same reasons all rich people ought to, not because he's advocating for better climate policy. Everyone ought to advocate for better climate policy!

Policy is the big picture. If we get that right, both income inequality and emissions will decline and more people will be better off. If we get it wrong, the size of DiCaprio's boat won't matter one way or the other.

CORRECTION: A DiCaprio press rep contacted us to let us know that Leo DiCaprio does not , as our original headline stated, own a yacht. The pictures show him using friends' yachts.

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Leonardo DiCaprio goes on and on about his environmental activism but he’s not above taking a helicopter from his yacht to land.

Eco warrior Leonardo DiCaprio takes helicopter from yacht to dinner Back to video

Go on Leo’s social media feeds and while he is famous for not detailing his private life, he isn’t lacking passion — albeit, about the environment and climate action.

But the Oscar winner doesn’t always back up his beliefs.

The actor-activist is reportedly in Italy — more specifically, the waters near the Italian shore – where he is vacationing on his yacht, as celebrities do, according to German newspaper Bild.

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View this post on Instagram A post shared by Leonardo DiCaprio (@leonardodicaprio)

For visits to the countryside, whether it be lunch or dinner or a nightclub, DiCaprio reportedly hops on a helicopter while aboard his luxury liner and heads to land — and back, of course.

La dolce vita at the expense of the environment? What would fellow celebrity climate activist Greta Thunberg say?

DiCaprio’s shore excursions are short and anything but green, making his speeches about reducing carbon emissions all the more sanctimonious.

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While it could be argued that the actor wasn’t going to swim to shore, there are more environmentally friendly ways to travel, particularly for someone who preaches about stopping climate change and building a sustainable economic future.

In 2016, during the Cannes Film Festival, DiCaprio reportedly left the French Riviera by private jet for a brief trip to New York City — to accept an environmental award, the New York Post reported at the time.

He hopped back on another private jet the following day to attend a gala in Antibes, France — a reported 12.8 kilometres from the film fest — and nearly 13,000 kilometres of air travel in two days.

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Leonardo DiCaprio Seeks the Truth About Climate Change in New Documentary

leonardo dicaprio yacht climate change

This weekend Leonardo DiCaprio’s latest movie will be released, but don't head to your local movie theater if you want to see it. The film,  Before the Flood , is an environmental documentary that airs Sunday on the National Geographic Channel (and will also stream online for free). The Academy Award-winning actor plays a starring role—himself—as he tries to understand the extent of climate change and why so little is being done to stop it. His findings are simple: There are brilliant activists, scientists, writers, inventors, and community leaders working to slow the Earth's warming, repair the damage, and prepare for future threats. But there’s one thing blocking their way—politics.

The film opens with the 2014 United Nations Climate Summit in New York City, where the Academy Award-winning actor was honored as a Messenger of Peace for the Climate. “It all seems beyond our control,” he says in a voiceover. “If the U.N. knew how pessimistic I am about our future, they may have picked the wrong guy.”

Over the course of 96 minutes, DiCaprio takes viewers on a world tour of climate change conflicts. He travels to Alberta's tar sands  (close to where he filmed his 2015 blockbuster  The Revenant ) , exposing a gaping void in the boreal wilderness where crude oil extraction continues unabated. He ventures to the volatile Arctic, where icebergs careen around him as the glaciers melt . He journeys to Miami Beach and the South Pacific isles, each facing a sinking future as sea level rises. And he explores the palm jungles of Indonesia, a landscape scorched by the demands of the food industry . At each of these locations, DiCaprio interviews experts who amplify the same message: Climate change is happening now, and it’s gaining speed—but world powers aren’t doing enough to stop it.

One of the major offenders is the United States. “This country is the real starting point in the discussion point of climate change,” says Mark Monroe, the writer for Before the Flood and other environmental features such as Chasing Ice and The Cove . “We have the highest standard of living; we’ve had the biggest reward; we’re doing the most harm.” The United States emits nearly 18 percent of the world’s carbon emissions , second only to China among the world’s countries.

Yet whether the climate is changing remains a topic of debate in the U.S. government, even as unequivocal proof piles up. And more often than not, it’s ignored entirely. This continued disagreement is part of what fueled the documentary, Monroe says. “Hearing from the scientific community isn’t enough” to convince people, he says. “But physically seeing these threatened places and counting them as evidence should be.”

The movie also aims to communicate the gravity of climate change to younger generations; it will be screened at 200 schools across the United States in the upcoming weeks. “Films stay around for a long time,” Monroe says. “And every four years, millions of new people get to vote.” He believes that shifting public opinion is the best way to correct the political problem.

That is no small task. “Try to have a conversation with anybody, and the people just want to tune out,” DiCaprio says in the film. But just starting the conversation is also an issue: A recent study found that people who think climate change is important rarely discuss it with family and friends. Even established green groups fail to address the world’s biggest environmental problem head-on. Just this month, a group of young environmentalists penned an open letter to the leaders of major conservation organizations, urging them to support the ratification of the first U.S. carbon tax in Washington State . “The silence is deafening,” they wrote. “Leaders of your stature belong on the field, not the sidelines.” (DiCaprio also tweeted his support for the tax earlier today.)

If the current state of inaction continues, models predict the damage will be irreparable. The seas are projected to rise by several feet by the end of the century. Hundreds of millions of people might be uprooted from their homes. More than 300 species of North American birds are at risk , along with countless other animals. These numbers are dizzying—so why aren’t they more persuasive?

At the end of the film, after President Obama and Pope Benedict both make appearances on screen, the scene cuts back to DiCaprio addressing the U.N. Climate Summit in 2014. “I’ve traveled all over the world in the last two years,” he says. “All that I’ve seen and learned on my journey has absolutely terrified me. No more talk; no more excuses; no more ten-year studies; no more allowing the fossil fuel companies to manipulate and dictate the science and policies that affect our future.”

Before the Flood —directed by Fisher Stevens and produced by DiCaprio—can be seen on the National Geographic Channel on Sunday, October 30 at 9 p.m. EST. It will also stream for free on YouTube, Hulu, iTunes, Amazon, Facebook, Twitter, and Google Play. It’s available in 171 nations and 45 languages. See here for more viewing options , and watch the trailer below.

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Pledge to stand with Audubon to call on elected officials to listen to science and work towards climate solutions.

leonardo dicaprio yacht climate change

Leonardo DiCaprio Called 'Eco Hypocrite' for Vacation on CO2-emitting Superyacht

Curated By : Entertainment Bureau

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Last Updated: January 10, 2022, 14:39 IST

Leonardo DiCaprio as Jordan Belfort in The Wolf of Wall Street

Leonardo DiCaprio as Jordan Belfort in The Wolf of Wall Street

Leonardo DiCaprio has been accused of being an 'eco hypocrite' as he holidays on a 110 million euros yacht.

Leonardo DiCaprio is vocal about Climate Change and urges his fans to take actions to combat the same time and again. Through his Netflix movie Don’t Look Up, he brought further attention to the issue. Not only this, he is a UN climate change ambassador and terms climate change to be “the most urgent threat facing our entire species”.

However, people are calling out him to be a hypocrite after he was seen vacationing with friends and girlfriend Camila Morrone in the Caribbean on a 110 million euros Vava II superyacht that stretches 315 feet. Vava II is the largest yacht to be manufactured in Britain and is estimated to produce 238kg of carbon dioxide per mile. The number is quite huge as it’s equivalent to the amount of CO2 an average British car emits in two months.

The environmentally-unfriendly yacht is estimated to cost a huge amount of £250,000 to fill its fuel tanks. The luxurious superyacht can accommodate up to 30 crew members and 22 guests. While many are taking a dig at Leonardo for using the yacht, others have shown their support.

The Daily Mail reports that shop tracking websites reveal that the yacht is stationary most of the time and can be seen travelling only a mile a day. Environmentalist Sarah Clayton supported Leonardo by highlighting his good work. She said, “I know celebrities lead these crazy lives, but Don’t Look Up has done so much to make people aware of climate change.”

Undoubtedly, Leonardo has been actively involved in saving the environment and doing his bit. To protect endangered species and land, the Titanic actor has donated 75 million euros to global conservation projects.

The source close to the actor told the Mirror that Leonardo doesn’t own the yacht and has not even rented it. Now, it’ll be interesting to know the actor’s stance on the same.

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  1. Leonardo DiCaprio picks up award for his environmental work before

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  2. Leonardo DiCaprio picks up award for his environmental work before

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  3. Environmentalist Leonardo DiCaprio Labelled 'Eco Hypocrite' For His

    leonardo dicaprio yacht climate change

  4. Leonardo DiCaprio's Climate Change Documentary

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  5. Leonardo DiCaprio traveled on gas-guzzling private jets, yachts while

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  6. National Geographic releases Leonardo DiCaprio's climate change

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COMMENTS

  1. Leonardo DiCaprio Criticized for Private Jet Use - Newsweek

    Leonardo DiCaprio, one of Hollywood's most prolific environmentalists, has received criticism after calling out climate change deniers at the Global Citizen festival in New York on Saturday.

  2. Leonardo DiCaprio traveled on gas-guzzling private jets ...

    Leonardo DiCaprio traveled across the world on gas-guzzling private jets and embarked on long yacht trips while his foundation quietly funded climate change lawsuits levied against Big...

  3. Why You Should Care About Celebrities’ Climate Hypocrisy

    F or years, outrage over the high-carbon consumption of the rich and famous in the face of climate change has stirred passionate outrage and accusations of hypocrisy, from Leonardo DiCaprio’s...

  4. Leonardo DiCaprio accused of being an 'eco hypocrite' as he ...

    Vocal climate change ambassador Leonardo DiCaprio has been accused of hypocrisy after being pictured relaxing on a super yacht while holidaying in St Barts.

  5. Leonardo DiCaprio's Carbon Footprint Is Much Higher Than He ...

    The movie star urged action on climate change in his acceptance speech for his Academy Award for Best Actor, but his actions undercut his moral authority on the topic.

  6. The Pollution From Leonardo DiCaprio's Superyacht Is One Of ...

    Leonardo DiCaprio is a dedicated and vocal environmental activist, having funneled millions of dollars into conservation efforts and using his platform to advocate for climate change action.

  7. Rich climate activist Leonardo DiCaprio lives a carbon ... - Vox

    Even if extravagant by mere mortal standards, DiCaprio's personal emissions are a fart in the wind when it comes to climate change.

  8. Eco warrior Leonardo DiCaprio takes helicopter from yacht to ...

    Leonardo DiCaprio goes on and on about his environmental activism but he’s not above taking a helicopter from his yacht to land.

  9. Leonardo DiCaprio Seeks the Truth About Climate Change in New ...

    Over the course of 96 minutes, DiCaprio takes viewers on a world tour of climate change conflicts. He travels to Alberta's tar sands (close to where he filmed his 2015 blockbuster The Revenant), exposing a gaping void in the boreal wilderness where crude oil extraction continues unabated.

  10. Leonardo DiCaprio Called 'Eco Hypocrite' for ... - News18

    The environmentally-unfriendly yacht is estimated to cost a huge amount of £250,000 to fill its fuel tanks. The luxurious superyacht can accommodate up to 30 crew members and 22 guests. While many are taking a dig at Leonardo for using the yacht, others have shown their support.