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05-18-2010, 02:04 PM  


Link to specs: <http://docs.google.com/fileview?id=0B39b157HaEoTYjI5NmIyZjktNDhkNy00NzY5L WE4ZTUtM2ExNTU1Njc3YTRi&hl=en>



06-03-2011, 01:10 PM  
01-25-2012, 03:58 PM  

Danny
07-24-2012, 06:43 PM  
07-25-2012, 02:46 AM  


Please send me the price which you have in mind for this marvellous ship.

Regards,

Jan
 
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Rapido Trimarans

Vale Mark Toia, the man who scaled navigation markers and cinematic heights

November 08, 2023

parallax 11 catamaran

It was back in 1986 or 1987 that Rapido’s co founder, Paul Koch (who was owner of OSTAC Yachts at the time), met a young boiler maker in Australia, named Mark Toia . Mark was also “a multihull guy” racing with the Multihull Yacht Club of Queensland .

People around the Club said that Mark was a good photographer. The same people said that Paul should ask him to photograph OSTAC’s new Parallax 11 catamaran.

And so a deal was quickly brokered to engage the services of the budding photographer.

For the princely sum of AUD50, Mark scaled a navigation marker in Queensland’s Moreton Bay to shoot the Parallax 11.

One of his photos promptly sailed onto the cover of Australian Multihull World magazine.

Mark would claim subsequently, on several occasions, that this was his first ever paid photography job. (Mark was also known to have quipped, “Paul dropped me off on this little rock with bird shit while he sailed back and forth on his fancy yacht!”)

As for whether it was Mark’s first paid job, Paul is a little more circumspect, saying, “If it wasn’t his first, then it was certainly one of his first”.

Fast forward to 2016 and Paul was now building Rapidos in Vietnam. One day, he noticed a video on Facebook that Mark Toia had shot in Vietnam (see video below which is “probably” the same video).

Paul immediately contacted Mark to say “Well done, congratulations, blah, blah – and would you be interested in doing a video on the new Rapido 60?”

Mark laughed heartily and told Paul that he no longer charged $50 for his work. Paul retorted, “Well, we’re just a boat builder and we don’t have the same marketing budgets as those car manufacturers”.

With the banter done, Mark went into problem-solving mode: “I can bring a camera, myself and my son – and we can make a video while we sail away on the Rapido 60.”

They took off from Batam Island, Indonesia and Mark captured his footage. Soon after, the master craftsman had produced a stunning video on the Rapido 60 (see below) and, as promised, it was done on a boat builder’s shoestring budget.

Mark of course has enjoyed a stellar career working with the biggest brands in the world including Jeep, Mercedes Benz, Ford, Adidas, BMG and Sony Music.

In 2020, he even self-funded the sci fi action movie, Monsters of Man. His aim was to “deliver studio blockbuster quality at a fraction of a budget of the most high-gloss cinematic films”.

Just two years ago, Rapido (not Paul) had cause to contact Mark. Mark seemed pleased to hear from us and almost immediately said, “Did you know that Paul was the first person to give me a paid photography job? $50 is what he paid me.”

As Mark scaled his cinematic heights, he never forgot the day he climbed the navigation marker in Moreton Bay.

Paul and Rapido were very saddened to learn of the passing of Mark Toia on 23 October 2023.

We send our sincere condolences to his family and friends.

To Mark, we say, Thank you. RIP.

Related Links

  • Mark Toia’s public Facebook page
  • Zoom Film, TV and Digital Content . Mark Toia’s website.
  • Legendary Australian filmmaker Mark Toia who was known for creating Jeep’s viral Superbowl ad dies following ‘short illness’ , Mail Online, 4 November 2023
  • To see a slightly different Mark Toia edit of the original Rapido 60 video, click here .

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Multihull Structure Thoughts

Discussion in ' Multihulls ' started by oldmulti , May 27, 2019 .

oldmulti

oldmulti Senior Member

Ross Turner designed and built his Coral Coaster 29 in 1983, and sailed her until 2005. The full bridge deck centre cockpit cat is 29 x 15.5 foot weighing 2700 lbs and displacing at full load 5400 lbs. The rig is a mast head with a 153 square foot main and 312 square foot genoa. The CC29 sailed between Australia and New Caledonia (915 miles of open ocean) and has done thousands of miles of coastal sailing. This is an ocean capable boat that is fast (8 knot averages 15 knots occasionally) if keep under the maximum displacement. All Ross’s designs (Jarcat 5, 6 and 7 as well as the CC 29) are based on the same plywood over timber technique which has proven to give a strong, fair hull at minimal weight, effort and cost. Epoxy glue and stainless steel screws are used with marine grade plywood and western red cedar stringers and frame edgings. Epoxy & thin fibreglass cloth and epoxy resin is applied over the entire exterior, and painted with epoxy undercoat and polyurethane top coat gives many years of maintenance free use. Unfortunately plans for this design are no longer available. Ross Turner was a genius at wooden boat design and construction as his smaller Jarcat range shows. If you build this boat to plan you would get a very strong ocean capable boat. The single chine hulls topsides are 6 mm ply with 9 mm ply bottoms that are glued and screwed every 100 mm to chine logs and gunnels. The boat is covered by 85 gsm glass cloth and epoxy. The bulkheads are 9 mm ply with stringers and some intermediate frames. The sterns are 12 mm ply. The underwing and cockpit seats are 9 mm plywood. The deck cabin is 6 mm plywood with framing support. The side windows are 6 mm acrylic. The forward windows are 10 mm acrylic. Internal furniture is 4 mm ply for shelves, doors, seat fronts etc. Catsketcher sat in a nice Coral Coaster 29 built by Jack Langois of Gosford. She was faster than she looked like she should be and had a lot of room for a 29 footer. The accommodation is out of the ordinary and needs a fair bit of calisthenics to get into the main table area (because it has sitting headroom only, you move between the hulls via the cockpit if you want full headroom). That said the boat worked well and Jack is happy with his boat.  

Attached Files:

Coral coaster 1.jpg, coral coaster 29 2.jpg, jarcat_cc29_2.jpg, jarcat_cc29_interior main 1.jpg, jarcat_cc29_interior galley.jpg.

The Grainger Alfresco 1060 is a sports cruiser semi bridge deck catamaran of 35 x 22.5 foot that displaces 6700 lbs carrying 764 square foot in the main and fore triangle. The first 2 of these boats that were built virtually side by side and had full headroom deck cabins built on them before they hit the water. These boats were the reason that Grainger decided to either full race cats or bridge deck cabin cruiser racers. One of the cats had a smooth curve joining the wing deck to the hull the other cat had a flat chamfer panel joining the wing deck to the hull. The flat chamfer panel cat was a bit faster and had a smoother ride in side by side sailing. Small things can make interesting differences. This design had at least 2 iterations. The initial design had hulls have a 10.8:1 length to beam ratio. The second version had hulls with a 9:1 length to beam ratio. A more realistic assessment of what people put in boats probably made the designer widen the hulls. The hulls of the initial boats were 2 layers of 270 gsm cloth 15 mm WRC 2 layers of 270 gsm cloth in epoxy. The layup is doubled below the waterline. The bridge deck was 18 mm duracore and glass. The decks and subsequent deck cabin were foam glass. The main cross beam structure is a combination of 2 web bulkheads 1.2 meters apart with unidirectional glass top and bottom of the “large” box. The mast sits on a bulkhead between the 2 webs. This was changed with the main deck cabin modifications. I have more details but the boats I saw being built were “evolved” as they were built which leaves me in doubt as to what was designed versus what was created by the builders so I will refrain for further structural information. The boats sailed well but I suspect their displacements were heavier than designed. The first jpeg is of the narrower hull version and the other 2 jpegs are of the later wider hull versions.  

Alfresco 1060 v 1.jpg

Alfresco 1060 v2 a.jpg, alfresco 1060 v2 b.jpg.

catsketcher

catsketcher Senior Member

I was very impressed with the Alresco 920s Twos Wild and Rum Tum Tugger. When we returned from cruising on our Twiggy trimaran we wanted something like the 920 or the Fastback 30. I corresponded with Grainger about a larger version of the 1060. He said he could stretch it for me and we thought very hard about it. I asked him about the lack of space in the dinette/galley area and stated that we could have much more room if the aft end of the cabin was made vertical and the accommodation extended aft. I was told that could not happen and we decided to not go ahead with a Grainger. Then I read an 8 year old mag (gotta keep your old mags) and saw an OSTAC ad for a Parallax 11 - a very lovely boat with no bridgedeck cabin. I rang the designer Robin Chamberlin and built an open bridgedeck 38 footer - which I still love 23 years later. Open bridgedeck cats seem like a good idea but in reality they are a bit of a pain. If it is wet, you want cover from the rain or spray, if sunny, you need cover from the sun, if the toilet is in one hull, you need to get dressed to go from your bunk to the dunny. If your son sleepwalks (one of ours did we found out) you have to lock them inside their hull at night. Our semi bridgdeck cat had two different solid cockpit covers before I eventually built a foam cabin. Now she looks pretty similar to most other cats but you can see well from inside and so we usually sit inside when voyaging, a vestige left over from her open bridgedeck days.  
YoungGrumpy. I have looked at the Fish and Chips plan and agree you could do dagger boards BUT it will effect the seating and accommodation plan available. Dagger boards are easier in theory but it depends on the dagger board case you make and how you install it. Having built a glass dagger case and a centerboard case there is not much in it. As the jpeg below will give you an idea of the work involved in just glassing in position the top of a dagger case let alone even more work required to do the bottom of a dagger board case you can get the idea why it may be easier to stick with the standard plan. A Fish and Chips is going to be a fast cruiser but will not be a racer and as a result the designed boards will be satisfactory for the boat. If you want all out speed up wind a really well shaped board will have more effect than brute area. Good luck on your building bug.  

Wildfire 28 daggercase ten.jpg

Catsketcher mentioned he was looking for another design, he liked the Alfresco 920 design (30 x 19 foot displacing 5700 lbs with 585 square foot of sail, structural details on page 20 number 292) and then asked for a larger version of the Alfresco 1060 from Grainger. Tony Grainger was reluctant to make the changes requested but Grainger eventually drew a larger version for a Belgium client called the Alfresco 430. The 430 is 43 x 26 foot displacing 15400 lbs and carrying a 573 square foot main and 418 square foot genoa. The hull length to beam is 9.5:1. The Alfresco 430, Bossanova, built in NZ, gained a reputation as a fast cruiser but occasionally was wet, as water went over the bow, pass the main crossbeam and down into open entrance hatches. Tony Grainger has lost the plans for this boat but basically it is a WRC glass hulls with plywood bulkheads and under wing. The decks were ply foam ply which was the fashion in NZ in the late 90's. During the initial test sail in NZ in 1997 Bossanover did 17 knots reaching in 25 knots of wind and 8.5 knots upwind under a full rig with 9 people on board. The accommodation has a wrap around seat that can sit 10 people and the galley etc is large and practical. The Alfresco 430 then morphed into the G430 full bridge deck cabin cat that basically had the same hulls but more bridge accommodation, slightly more displacement and sail area. Due to the 920’s excellent sailing ability and good design I suspect other designers were inspired. At the same stage Robin Chamberlin after having designed the Parallax 11 designed a smaller version called the Parallax 9. The 9 was 29.5 x 18 foot weighing 4000 lbs displacing 5200 lbs carrying a 305 square foot main and a 310 square foot drifter reacher on a 40 foot aluminium fractional rig mast. The boat was foam glass with triaxial, biaxial cloths and vinylester resins throughout as it was built in production moulds. Having walked aboard both the 920 and Parallax 9, the 920 suited my style better having a bit more room where required. In a race between the 920 and Parallax 9, both with dagger boards and similar rigs, I would suspect it would depend on the skipper more than the boat as to which was faster. We will discuss the Parallax 11 (which is also the Corsair 3600 and extended version Parallax 11.6) in the next item.  

Alfresco 920 1.jpg

Alfresco 920 2.jpg, alfresco 920 4.jpg, alfresco 430 1.jpg, alfresco 430 2.jpg, catamaran-alfresco-430-in-auckland.jpg, par 9 1.jpg, par 9 2.jpg, parallax 9 1.jpg, parallax 9 side.jpg, parallax 9 2.jpg, parallax 9 aft.jpg, parallax 9 fwd.jpg, parallax 9 double.jpg, parallax 9 4.jpg.

jamez

jamez Senior Member

Thanks for the info on the Alfresco's OM. My collection of material begins in the early 2000s so that fills in a lot of gaps. You can see how the Mystery Cove boats (with designed in BD cabins) evolved from them. Tony Grainger must have been pretty pissed with people adding their own cabins because he still mentions it on his website . TG seems to have designed other series' that were relatively short lived such as the single step cabin 10, 10.6, 11.8 and 12.2 which were available in the late 2000s. More recently several other types have appeared on his site only to quickly disappear such as the Barefoot and Flying Fish. His current focus seems to be the Raku series which look pretty nice.  
Jamez. I thought the attached PDF would be of interest. I will be getting back to some older Grainger designs soon.  

Grainger cruise cat pdf.pdf

Grainger cruise cat pdf.pdf

The Parallax 11 started as a semi bridge deck catamaran similar to its daughter the Parallax 9. But the Parallax 11 morphed very quickly into a full cabin bridge deck catamaran. The 11 was 36 x 20 foot initially weighing 8500 lbs with a 48 foot mast carrying a 456 square foot main and a 383 square foot genoa. The Parallax is composite sandwich construction, Divinycell core vacuum-bagged with Triaxial and Biaxial composites; even the bulkheads and kitchen counters are foam cored to save weight. The structure of the female molded cat hulls were 225 CSM, 576 gsm triax 15 mm divinycell, 410 gsm biax in vinylester resin. The layup was doubled below the waterline. The deck/cab layup 225 CSM, 576 gsm triax 12 mm divinycell, 410 gsm biax in vinylester resin. The internal furniture is 225 csm, 410 gsm biax, 8 mm divinycell 410 gsm biax. The Parallax 11 are fully integrated structurally sound cats. According to one owner “The boat can be a very good performer when lightly loaded. On a recent trip to Bermuda in a little over three days, which is very good. The Parallax is only happy if left to her anorexic tendencies. Heavily laden as she will be for the trip to the Caribbean, she will be if not slow, laboured.” The Parallax 11 morphed into the Corsair 3600 about 1992 with slightly widen hulls to take a greater payload. The claimed displacement of the 3600 varied between 9900 lbs and 11200 lbs, so the wider hulls were needed. An extended version called the Corsair 4100 was proposed being a Corsair 3600 having an additional 4 feet inserted in the middle to improve the space in the main deck cabin and a foot added to the stern for an overall length of 41 foot. A Corsair 3600 has circumnavigated doing over 25,000 plus miles surviving many storms. The cat averaged 7 to 8 knots in reasonable winds and peaked at 18 knots when surfing or lightly loaded. Finally there was a Parallax 11.6 which was 2 foot longer and 1 foot wider but slightly lighter at 9000 lbs.  

Parallax_11 1.jpg

Parallax_11_layout.jpg, parallax 11 aft.jpg, parallax_11 2.jpg, parallax_11 galley.jpg, parallax_11_berth.jpg, parallax_11 3.jpg, parallax 11 rig a.jpg.

The Mystery Cove 380 was one of Tony Graingers more popular full bridge deck cruising catamarans. The cat is 38 x 23 foot displacing at the dead water line 15800 lbs. The rig is fractional carrying a 513 square foot main and a 367 square foot number 1. The main and foretriangle is 798 square foot. The hull length to beam is 10:1. This boat can sail well and handle a reasonable payload. The structure of the boat is mainly foam glass. The hulls are 850 gsm quadax, 450 gsm 45/45 biax, 20 mm divinycell foam, 600 gsm quadax, 450 gsm 45/45 biax. The underwing is 2 layers of 600 gsm 45/45 biax, 25 mm divinycell, 2 layers 600 gsm 45/45 biax. The cabin top is 600 gsm quadax, 450 gsm 45/45 biax, 25 mm divinycell foam, 600 gsm quadax, 450 gsm 45/45 biax. Intermediate bulkheads are 2 layers of 450 gsm biax either side of 15 mm divinycell foam. The webs on the main bulkhead 2 layers of 600 gsm biax either side of 20 mm divinycell foam with a top and bottom flange of unidirectional glass. There were at least 3 variants of this boat. One variation is a strip plank cedar hull home builders version with some plywood bulkheads. The “production” version as above and a narrower beam version of 21 foot that displaced 13200 lbs.  

MC 380 1.jpg

Mc 380 2.jpg, mystery_cove_380 water.jpg, mc 380 3.jpg, mc 380 4.jpg, mc 380 main cab.jpg, mc 380 maincab 1.jpg, mc 380 galley.jpg, mc 380 bunk.jpg, mc 380 fwd.jpg.

Frantic Drift is a one off tri built in the late 90’s by a NZ guy who wanted fast tri for the 8.5 meter class. The tri was extended to 30 foot to fit an outboard. The tri is 30 x 24.6 foot weighing 1570 lbs (including rig). The carbon mast is 45 foot high with a cloud of sail. This sounds very light and what’s with the sail area. This tri on a boat test in 10 knots of wind recorded a maximum speed of 19.8 knots using a reacher. The owner claims the tri is capable of 20 plus knots, really? This is a pure racing machine with effectively 3 limited berths and not much else. The sail area is Kevlar, spectra with mast head kites and screachers etc. The main hull is from the outside 2 layers of unidirectional 200 gsm Kevlar, 10 mm foam, 200 gsm carbon cloth inside. The main hull bottom has an additional Kevlar 45/45 on the bottom all one in epoxy. The floats are 175 gsm Kevlar cloth, 200 gsm e-glass cloth, 10 mm foam, 200 gsm carbon cloth inside. The cross beams are ply, cedar, fiberglass with carbon flanges. The foils are fiberglass and carbon. All this adds up to a boat that accelerates like hell and responds to any puffs etc. needing the helms person and crew to be very aware of what is going on as the first jpeg shows. Good main hull shape. Now the part that really worries me. This boat is crewed by 2 Olympians, so no lack of talent. The results of the 2011 Coastal Classic 125 nautical mile race. A 60 foot OMRA racing tri won in 5 hrs 44 mins, a 50 foot all carbon “cruising” cat second in 7 hrs 24 mins, a 40 foot Grainger racing cat third in 7 hrs 52 mins, followed by 3 x 8.5 meter cats finishing 8 hrs 30 mins to 9 hrs 48 mins etc. Frantic Drift came in 10 th in 10 hrs 14 mins. It obvious that this tri is too much of “cruiser” for NZ. No wonder NZ thinks that if you’re not up to America’s Cup standard in sailing, your not trying hard enough. Frantic Drift only averaged 12.2 knots, Attitude 13.8 knots, Dirty Deeds a 8.5 meter averaged 14.7 knots, the OMRA 60 racing tri averaged 21.7 knots over 125 miles. Frantic Drift would be a winner in most fleets around the world but in NZ it’s just a fast boat that’s beaten by 4 mm tortured plywood 28 foot cats like Attitude.  

Frantic Drift 1.jpg

Frantic drift 2.jpg, fd sailing 2.jpg, fd after caosize.jpg.

YoungGrumpy

YoungGrumpy Junior Member

Oldmulti, appreciate you answering. My only concerns now with the centerboard would be a) fouling/marine growth - daggerboard slots on my Seawind 24 here require regular cleaning, or I have a hard time moving them in or out b) control lines access - but that is more of a search for a better solution. Then it is to the holy grail of a small cat - "one pin, two bolts from trailer to water"- search. What Ray is offering is probably better that what I have, but should be improved.  
YoungGrumpy. Please look at page 29 number 426 on this thread for ideas on folding cats. Fish and Chips hulls are good but the one pin 2 bolt search is every ones holy grail. Takeaway is one option but there are others. Even Seawind 24 builders built a one of folding version that folded like Thomas Firth Jones 23 foot Brine Shrimp. The standard cross beams were cut in half, aluminum plates welded on the cut ends and a hinge arrangement attached. It worked OK. The boats performance was unaffected. The jpegs are of Simpsons Takeaway.  

Simpson Cat Plans2.jpg

Takeaway expanded.jpg, takeawy partial fold a.jpg, takeaway 7_2.jpg.

Tom Speer wrote this in 2013 to explain how a tri float should be designed in relation to the main hull at various wind speed strengths. A foiling tri implied in the design which is interesting as Tom got a little side lined from his aerospace career, where he did aircraft foil design, into doing work for Oracle’s first big wing mast America’s Cup tri USA 17. He said he did the initial calculations of the wing mast foil at his daughter’s wedding! The blue lines in the diagrams below are the heel and trim angles as the wind speed increases, the black lines are the apparent wind speed. What it shows is as the wind speed increase the heel angle increases and the bow trim angle is increasingly negative. This implies either the float centre of buoyancy has to move forward or the float is moved forward. Tom Speers words from here “When designing the size and position of the amas, you should construct a mulithull footprint diagram like this: It shows the virtual center of gravity location (the c.g. location that would provide the same pitch and roll moments as the sail rig) (black lines). It also shows the combined center of buoyancy of the two hulls as a function of pitch and heel angles, with the total displacement equal to the weight (blue lines). (You can include the down-force from the rig if you want to get really fancy.) Since the virtual c.g. and the center of buoyancy have to coincide, you can read off the heel and trim angles for each sailing condition. You can also convert stability indices, such as from Shuttleworth , and do the same thing. Diagonal capsize is generally the most critical condition for a trimaran. The footprint plot helps to strike the right balance between pitchpole, diagonal, and sideways stability.” Next we will discuss one solution to the dynamics of tri designs The jpeg is USA 17.  

USA-17-floats longer than main.jpg

The way that Malcolm Tennant overcame the problem of diagonal stability in a trimaran was aggressive thinking for its day. He shifted the floats forward in relation to the main hull. The float bows were up to 4 feet in front of the main hull bow. Modern trimarans achieve increased diagonal stability by shifting the centre of float buoyancy forward and moving the centre of gravity of the main hull (entire boat) and rig aft. I don’t know the chronological order of the designs but 3 Tennant trimaran designs appeared in a short period. ‘s The 23 foot Demon Tricycle, the 31 or 28.5 foot Firebird and the 39 foot Wild Thing. Wild Thing was one of the first strip plank cedar multihulls built. Firebird was basically a Great Barrier Express catamaran hull used as a main hull with floats attached and Demon Tricycle main hull was limited by the length of 3 sheets of 8 x 4 foot plywood. The build of each varies. Demon Tricycle is 26 x 21 foot overall with a 23 foot main hull and 30 foot mast and about 260 square foot sail area. DT is a 4.8 mm tortured plywood for all 3 hulls with aluminium cross beams. The builder initially wanted an open cockpit boat but the design morphed into a cabin boat after initial sailings The design then was formalised by Tennant to be a full cabin boat shown in the jpegs. This boat was/possible still is fast. It could out sail standard Buccaneer 24’s and in racing has given a few highly modified Buccaneer 24’s a hard time. Next came Firebird a 31 x 23.5 foot overall with a 28 foot main hull displacing 2000 lbs with a 36 foot 149 x 99 mm mast carrying 395 square foot of sail. This is the most well known forward float designs. The main hull was 2 layers of 4.5 mm ply with 8 mm ply bulkheads and 12 mm ply main crossbeam bulkhead. The main hull keel is 25 x 100 mm timber, the gunnels are 25 x 50 mm. The floats are 2 layers of 2.4 mm plywood with 8 mm bulkheads. The float keel is 30 x 60 mm. The main hull and float decks are 2 layers of 4.5 mm ply. Bunks and cabin soles are 8 mm ply. The fore and aft crossbeams are 154 x 105 mm 2.6 lbs/foot mast tubes. The dolphin striker goes from float gunnel to float gunnel and is a stainless steel strap. We will discuss Wild Thing in the next item along with Oracle 17. These boats have more in common than you would think. The jpegs are of Demon Tricycle and an owners report and Firebird study and photo. The final 2 jpegs are Malcolm Tennants explanation of the float forward thinking.  

Demon tricycle 1.jpg

Demon tricycle 2.jpg, demon tricycle 4.jpg, demon tricycle 3 23 ft.jpg, demon tricycle t2.jpg, firebird 1.jpg, firebird 2.jpg, firebird manuahi 1.jpg, firebird desc.jpg, tennant fwd flt 1.jpg, tennant fwd float 2.jpg.

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Malcolm Tennant’s Wild Thing was a radical boat for its day being both a float forward concept and one of the first multihulls publicly built with strip plank cedar unidirectional glass construction. Wild Thing is 38.4 x 29.5 foot displacing 4000 lbs carrying 675 square foot of sail area. The tri was designed for sheltered water sailing with low freeboard and minimal accommodation. By shifting the floats forward in relation to the main hull Tennant gained diagonal stability for hard sailing. The tri could carry a full rig in stronger winds without lee bowing. This tri was lightly built with longitudinal wrc strips and unidirectional e glass at 90 degrees inside and out. The cross arms were aluminium with stainless steel dolphin striker. What’s the relationship between this 40 year old design and Oracle 17 AC tri? Look at Oracle’s hull and float configuration. Oracle 17 was designed to beat a rule of a 90 foot waterline. So, the main hull is 90 foot long. The floats were 113 foot long, the tris beam was 90 foot and it displaced 38000 lbs. The solid 2 part wing mast ended up being 226 foot high. Now Oracle 17 could place its floats in any position it wanted but choose to have float bows ahead of the main hull bow. Tom Speer diagrams on page 43 indicates the thinking that was going on inside Oracle camp. With a rig that big that continuously brought the wind forward of the beam (USA 17 could do 28 knots boat speed in 10 knots of wind speed) the boat was always going upwind and could easily be overpowered with slight gusts. It was better to have the floats centre of buoyancy ahead of the main hulls centre of buoyancy to help hold the bows up in stronger gusts. The next generation of AC cats that foiled have a similar design dilemma; how much lift do you have the forward foils handle versus the lift generated by the rear foils. As the rig powers up the forward overturning or tripping component increases. Do you add “spare” foil capacity to provide additional lift but accept extra foil drag at lower speeds or do you optimise and accept you will have a very sensitive foiling boat to handle in stronger winds. In the first iteration of foiling cats they were not allowed to have moving foils but later AC boats had foils that could move a couple of degrees to generate additional lift. Result smaller boats capable of higher speed but tricker to handle. Wild Thing was a precursor solution to the same issues that Oracle 17 faced. The jpegs are of a couple different Wild Things and of the initial WRC Wild Thing being built. Oracle USA 17 jpegs next.  

Wildthing 1.jpg

Wilthing 2.jpg, wild thing desc.jpg, wildthing build 1.jpg, wild thing tennant 40 ft.jpg, wildthing tennant.jpg, usa 17 oracle-artemis-tri1_2.jpg, usa 17 sail 2.jpg, usa 17 sail 3.jpg.

sailingsunstar2

recognize this multihull?

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parallax 11 catamaran

  • Nov 1, 2021

Parallax Past and Present

Updated: Sep 9, 2023

In 2006 my first Parallax, a sweet Corsair 2006 Catamaran.........

parallax 11 catamaran

and me embarked on a one year adventure to sail from Hampton Va to The BVI's as part of the rally then known as the Caribbean 1500. My good friend Bill Bloodgood served as crew on the 1500 mile (more or less) crossing After that I single handed south to Tobago through the Caribean chain and then back to Hampton VA.

I kept a web site then to share the adventure before the plethora of social media sites and share platforms were available. It was fun. I still smile when I look at the post and pictures even though its so dated that its well "quaint" ? But its really the start of years of sailing adventures and a bit of context for this new site. It might make you smile as well. Parallaxcat.com . Roll forward 15 years, a bigger faster Parallax and a few more trips under my belt. Parallax is an Erik le Rouge design long skinny light and fast, Le Rouge in my opinion one of the best catamaran designers anywhere. At 14.8 meters length beam of 7.4 and a draft a 1.25 meter her stated weight is 17000 lbs, more like 19000 I would say, but still very light. Vinylester in the layup and a full one inch airex foam core coupled with the Larouge cambered cross beam make her incredibly stiff. The weight is concentrated in the center with the engines well forwardand a ton of un burdened bouancy forward and aft keep her from hobbyhorsing in a seaway.

She was designed to sail , though she has plenty of storage and space for a cruising couple, the compromises skew toward performance, maximising interior space and occupancy was not the highest design priority

I purchased her in 2017 almost devoid of usable systems. I designed and installed the hydralic link steering , electrics, installed a new electronic and navigation suite including autopilot to drive the new hydralics. I also modified the chain locker to make room for a new windless with greater chainfall. Robbyn and I laboriously painted her with Alexseal seafoam green and recently dressed her out with a new North main as well as new standing and upgraded running rigging. I also continued to upgrade the power systems and she now has 1100 watts of solar power and 600 amp hours of lithium batteries . She can go days, even weeks with only the force of the sun to power her seperate freezer and refrigiator, airfryer, microwave, washer dryer and water maker.

After working out a few bugs on her initial trip to Antigua in 2017, which will soon be a post in the MacGyver section, she has sailed around 20,000 miles without a major failure . She's now decked out in LED lighting and underwater floods, ill try to post some more pics

# A note about Erik Le Rouge. i discovered sometime after I bought Parallax that the now defunct manufacturer and Mr. Le Rouge were not on the best terms. From what I gather Mr Le Rouge was perhaps not paid nor consented to the use of the design. I dont know the real Gin and unless I meet Mr Le Rouge one day never will. But in my OPINION it's defintley a Le Rouge inspired if not out right design (look at the Freydis cat) So i am giving credit where i think its due.

parallax 11 catamaran

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Used Yachts For Sale

Sail catamarans 35ft > 40ft,          parallax boats for sale, parallax 11 boats for sale, parallax 11  .

parallax 11 catamaran

ABOUT THE SELLER

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2
and the







is a Corsair 36 catamaran.

About the crew.

 

The is a 36-foot cruising catamaran made by Corsair. Corsair is a top end manufacturer known mainly for their series of cruising trimarans. I am told the only made perhaps 5 catamarans. The Parallax is foam cored; even the bulkheads and kitchen counters are foam cored to save weight. It was built using vacuum bag construction and vinylester resin. The hull is incredibly stiff and strong, if more subject to impact damage.

The boat has watertight bulkheads and after hurricane Isabel was left impaled on two 8 inch pilings. I actually cut the boat off the pilings with a chain saw and then motored the boat to the marine yard 10 miles away. Not a drop of water entered the living quarters.

The boat can be a very good performer when lightly loaded. On a recent trip to Bermuda my dad and I made the trip in a little over three days. Smoking for a 36 footer. The is only happy if left to her anorexic tendencies. Heavily laden as she will be for the trip to the Caribbean, she will be if not slow, labored.

is 36 feet overall and a hair less on the waterline with a 20 foot beam. At 56 feet above the water and a sweeping boom her main is enormous. She has a retractable bow sprit for the asymmetrical spinnaker which her skipper loves to set. With only two 18 horse Volvos she was not meant to be motored, but with a stiff wind and in fighting weight she is a fun, fast, and comfortable boat to sail

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parallax 11 catamaran

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Small Catamaran Comparison: Excess 11 vs. Bali Catsmart

The size of catamarans has seen an increase over the years, with boats measuring 45′ now considered average-sized and prices soaring to reach one million euros and more… It’s almost as if the shipyards have forgotten the success of smaller catamarans like the Lagoon 380 and its 800 units built.

Almost simultaneously, two shipyards have revived these smaller sized boats with very different approaches: the Excess 11 and the Bali Catsmart .

Different because the catamaran landscape includes two major types of boats – the ultra-light and very sporty catamarans, and the very well-equipped boats, which are more comfort-orientated. The Excess 11 and the Catsmart position themselves between these two extremes, each by using a different yet appealing recipe to create affordable four-cabin catamarans.

Excess 11, a sailors’ catamaran

parallax 11 catamaran

Honor to the older of the two, the Excess 11, which first showcased at the Dusseldorf Boot 2020 boat show. Excess is a recent brand from the Beneteau group aimed at producing lighter, simpler catamarans, offering more sailing sensations than their heavy Lagoon counterparts.

Excess catamarans, while they sail well, are not designed for racing or regattas – they are not high-performance vessels that tolerate no errors. Rather, they are comfortable cruising catamarans, but with a sporty look, and capable of offering great sailing sensations. While large catamarans with a hydraulic steering system have other advantages, they tend to provide little more navigating pleasure than that of a heavy machine carving its way through the waves.

On the Excess, special care has been taken to satisfy the sailing enthusiast. Very often, and we see this at our bases every season, sailing enthusiasts switch to catamarans for family reasons. This change is made at the sacrifice of the very soul of sailing, the pleasure of steering a well-adjusted sailboat and feeling the sensations of its motion. Several technical solutions have been adopted to improve its handling. With an Excess, there is no sacrifice!

This is especially true for the Excess 11, as the first two models from Excess (12 and 15) used the hulls of a Lagoon catamaran . The Excess 11 is the first boat in the range to be built on its own molds.

Excess 11, a sporty look

parallax 11 catamaran

It is hard not to succumb to the charm of this catamaran when you see it for the first time. With its massive bulging bows, a set-back cockpit, a long roof overhang, and the mast positioned forward of the cockpit, it has a rather pleasant roadster-like appearance. It’s a boat that captures attention, especially since its hull has immediately recognizable features and it can be delivered in gray. The cockpit position, which suits it so well, is dictated purely by sailing considerations.

By moving the cockpit aft, the mast could be moved forward on the main beam (the primary structural component of the boat that connects the two hulls) without the mast’s support interfering with the interior space. With a forward mast, you gain in mainsail area and therefore in power and speed. The boat also comes with a self-tacking jib, making it easy to handle with a reduced crew, and has a bowsprit designed to accommodate a code sail.

This design is also reflected in the two steering stations, which are located at the very rear of each hull, in a position reminiscent of monohulls. From the rear, you can see the tips of the hulls and the sails, but you are also close to the boat’s social: the cockpit and the saloon. The skipper is no longer isolated, alone on the flybridge.

A catamaran full of sailing-oriented details

parallax 11 catamaran

Each steering station is equipped with a wheel, positioned just like on a monohull, close to the pulleys of each rudder. The steering of these boats is carried out by means of Dyneema lines. These ultra-solid textile tiller ropes are relatively short, and offer the skipper sailing sensations very close to those experienced on a monohull. These short tiller ropes are not used on larger boats, which prefer hydraulic or cable-controlled actuators – both of which completely eliminate the steering feedback.

parallax 11 catamaran

In the front, the path of the anchor chain and the davit have been moved slightly off-centre to clear the bowsprit, intended to be used with a code zero (not present on the charter/rental version).

The shipyard has done a fine job with its supplier of lines and ropes. Halyards, ropes, reefing lines, tiller ropes and moorings are all braided in a range of assorted colors, but are made in such a way as to remain distinguishable at a glance. Inside, this work is also found on the drawer handles made of cordage.

About the space

parallax 11 catamaran

Inside, there is headroom of more than 2 1⁄2-feet throughout. In the cockpit, there is the galley, a dining table and a navigation table. The atmosphere is bright, with whites, grey floors and minimal use of wood.

parallax 11 catamaran

In the hulls, there are three or four cabins, whose aft cabins stand out due to their large 6.5×6.5-foot beds! The cabins share a bathroom per hull.

Excess 11 in three figures: 11.33 m / 37.17 ft overall length, 6.59 m / 21.62 ft beam, 9 tons and 77 m2 / 828.52 ft2 of upwind sail area.

Bali Catsmart

parallax 11 catamaran

A Bali powerhouse of 36 feet When Bali announced its Catsmart, the word on the docks was that a wave of panic rose at Lagoon, which had no such project in the pipeline…

The Catsmart is also a 36-foot catamaran, whose configuration is totally different from that of the Excess. Here, Bali has incorporated almost all the design strengths of its other models to create a concentrated vessel of smaller size. The price, fully equipped, is also modest, at less than €500,000.

And Bali catamarans have no shortage of strengths. It is these distinctive elements of comfort and differentiation that have contributed so much to the lightning-fast success of this range of cruising catamarans.

A solid forward deck and XXL sunbeds

parallax 11 catamaran

Up front, where competitors install trampolines, Bali decks the entire forward section. This approach offers various advantages despite what the competition (may) say about the additional weight at the front. It works well to provide additional outdoor space with a table where the entire crew can gather.

A table, but also an enormous sunbathing area, covered with cushions designed to stay in place while sailing. This forward arrangement is particularly pleasant when cruising. Early in the morning while the sun is still low it’s a pleasure to have an open-air meal, just like dining on a terrace.

At lunch and in the evening, you can equally enjoy the shelter of the roof and its overhang to escape the sun.

A fused cockpit-saloon area

parallax 11 catamaran

In the aft cockpit area is merged seamlessly with the saloon thanks to the tilting rear wall, which allows the boat to be used “fully open air” in temperate weather, or closed, after the sun sets. This clever combination allows the use of a single, larger table at this place, with a comfortable sofa opposite. Inside, the kitchen faces the direction of sailing and occupies the entire width of the boat.

Bali Catsmart’s pivoting rear door lends great versatility to its common areas. No redundant furniture: the use of space is maximised. Operating the door is very easy, and its operation is similar to that of a garage door. The comparison ends there though, as the Catsmart’s door is insulated and coated with a gel coat.

The forward-facing kitchen is pleasant for the cook, who can quickly lose sight of his recipes if he lets himself get caught up in the view. This configuration is made possible by the absence of a front door, which is the only Bali detail that the shipyard could not incorporate into the highly successful Catsmart.

Both helm stations are placed, as on the Excess, at the very back of the hulls. The starboard station is the primary one with two winches. The winch for the mainsail is located aft and handles the mainsail traveler and the headsail sheet (self-tacking), while the other winch manages the reefs and halyards. Just in front of the console, the headsail furler block is within easy reach of the helmsman. The port station has only one winch, used for the topping lift and a reefing line.

Bright cabins

parallax 11 catamaran

Bali Catsmart in four figures: 11.78 m / 38.65 ft overall length, 6.46 m / 21.19 ft beam, 8.4 tons and 99 m2 / 1065.24 ft2 of upwind sail area

The choice is yours between the Bali Catsmart and the Beneteau Excess 11, two sailboats that are very similar in terms of specifications (length, width, weight, sail area) but very different in terms of onboard experience. Two very successful concepts, each of which took their advantages to the extreme to create two very beautiful boats.

It’s up to you to choose the one that suits you best!

_____________________________

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  2. Parallax 11: Sailing Catamaran for Sale

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  3. Parallax 11: Sailing Catamaran for Sale

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  4. Parallax 11: Sailing Catamaran for Sale

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  5. Used Parallax 11 for Sale

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  6. Used Parallax 11 for Sale

    parallax 11 catamaran

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COMMENTS

  1. Used Parallax 11 for Sale | Yachts For Sale | Yachthub

    Quality built by Ostac, of Farrier trimaran fame, this Australian designed Catamaran was constructed using ground breaking methods for the time. Vacuume bagged Bi-axial, Tri-axial cloth over foam core with vinalester resin means that there is ZERO osmosis in this clasic little cat.

  2. 38' Catamaran For Sale - Cruiser Log World Cruising & Sailing ...

    38' Catamaran For Sale. Deva is a Parallax 11.6 sailing catamaran, custom built in Australia by OSTAC, based on a performance hull design by Robin Chamberlin. Her design brief was for family cruising and racing in Queensland's Great Barrier Reef.

  3. Used Parallax 11 for Sale | Yachts For Sale | Yachthub

    Parallax 11. Production built Robin Chamberlain designed Parallax 11 up for sale! Quality built by Ostac, of Farrier trimaran fame, this...Find out more

  4. Vale Mark Toia, the man who scaled navigation markers and ...

    For the princely sum of AUD50, Mark scaled a navigation marker in Queensland’s Moreton Bay to shoot the Parallax 11. One of his photos promptly sailed onto the cover of Australian Multihull World magazine.

  5. Multihull Structure Thoughts | Page 43 | Boat Design Net

    But the Parallax 11 morphed very quickly into a full cabin bridge deck catamaran. The 11 was 36 x 20 foot initially weighing 8500 lbs with a 48 foot mast carrying a 456 square foot main and a 383 square foot genoa.

  6. Parallax Past and Present - Sailing Parallax

    Parallax Past and Present. Updated: Sep 9, 2023. In 2006 my first Parallax, a sweet Corsair 2006 Catamaran......... and me embarked on a one year adventure to sail from Hampton Va to The BVI's as part of the rally then known as the Caribbean 1500.

  7. Parallax 11: Sailing Catamaran for Sale - Boats Online

    Quality built by Ostac, of Farrier trimaran fame, this Australian designed Catamaran was constructed using ground breaking methods for the time. Vacuume bagged Bi-axial, Tri-axial cloth over foam core with vinalester resin means that there is ZERO osmosis in this clasic little cat.

  8. Where's Chase Now? | About the Boat - Where's Parallax Now?

    The Parallax is a 36-foot cruising catamaran made by Corsair. Corsair is a top end manufacturer known mainly for their series of cruising trimarans. I am told the only made perhaps 5 catamarans. The Parallax is foam cored; even the bulkheads and kitchen counters are foam cored to save weight.

  9. Sail Catamarans 35ft > 40ft | Used Yachts For Sale | Yachthub

    Fiberglass sailing catamaran. Cutter rig. Sails have recently been to the sailmaker for new UV strips and boom cover.… Tuross Head NSW, New South Wales. AU $65,000 View Listing.

  10. Small Catamaran Comparison: Excess 11 vs. Bali Catsmart

    The Excess 11 and the Catsmart position themselves between these two extremes, each by using a different yet appealing recipe to create affordable four-cabin catamarans. Excess 11, a sailors’ catamaran