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rascal 14 sailboat

Boat Name Rascal 14
Manufacturer Ray Greene
Hull Type Daysailor
LOA 14'5"  (4.4m)
Beam 6'0"  (1.83m)
Weight 400  (181.8kg)
Ballast   (kg)
Keel Type centerboard
Berths
Draft Up 11"  (0.28m)
Draft Down 3'0"  (0.91m)
Year Start 1961
Year End
Number Made 3000
Country
MIC
Shortypen ID 383
Clone

Rascal 14 Sailboat by Ray Greene

Review of Rascal 14

Basic specs..

The hull is made of fibreglass. Generally, a hull made of fibreglass requires only a minimum of maintenance during the sailing season. And outside the sailing season, just bottom cleaning and perhaps anti-fouling painting once a year - a few hours of work, that's all.

The boat equipped with a fractional rig. A fractional rig has smaller headsails which make tacking easier, which is an advantage for cruisers and racers, of course. The downside is that having the wind from behind often requires a genaker or a spinnaker for optimal speed.

The Rascal 14 is equipped with a centerboard keel. A centerboard keel is a pivoting lifting keel, allowing to sail both coastal and inland waters.

The boat can sail close to the beach as the draft is just 0.28 - 0.38 meter (0.92 - 1.22 ft) dependent of the load. See immersion rate below.

Sailing characteristics

This section covers widely used rules of thumb to describe the sailing characteristics. Please note that even though the calculations are correct, the interpretation of the results might not be valid for extreme boats.

The immersion rate is defined as the weight required to sink the boat a certain level. The immersion rate for Rascal 14 is about 53 kg/cm, alternatively 302 lbs/inch. Meaning: if you load 53 kg cargo on the boat then it will sink 1 cm. Alternatively, if you load 302 lbs cargo on the boat it will sink 1 inch.

Sailing statistics

This section is statistical comparison with similar boats of the same category. The basis of the following statistical computations is our unique database with more than 26,000 different boat types and 350,000 data points.

What is L/B (Length Beam Ratio)?

Maintenance

This section is reserved boat owner's modifications, improvements, etc. Here you might find (or contribute with) inspiration for your boat.

Do you have changes/improvements you would like to share? Upload a photo and describe what you have done.

We are always looking for new photos. If you can contribute with photos for Rascal 14 it would be a great help.

If you have any comments to the review, improvement suggestions, or the like, feel free to contact us . Criticism helps us to improve.

Boatsector

Centerboard Dinghy

Specifications RASCAL 14

Home - Sailboat Listings 14.42 ft / 4.40 m - 1961 - Ray Greene - Ray Greene (USA)

Specifications RASCAL 14

RASCAL 14 Sailboat Data

Hull Type: Centerboard Dinghy Rigging Type: Fractional Sloop LOA: 14.42 ft / 4.40 m LWL: 13.83 ft / 4.22 m S.A. (reported): 121.00 ft² / 11.24 m² Beam: 6.00 ft / 1.83 m Displacement: 400.00 lb / 181 kg Max Draft: 3.00 ft / 0.91 m Min Draft: 0.92 ft / 0.28 m Construction: FG First Built: 1961 # Built: 3000 Builder: Ray Greene (USA) Designer: Ray Greene

Information from  sailboatdata.com .

Hull Speed: 4.98 kn

Specifications RASCAL 14

Rascal 14
Development
Designer
Location
Year1961
built3,000
Builder(s)
Role
NameRascal 14
Boat
400 lb (181 kg)
3.00 ft (0.91 m) with the down
Hull
Type
Construction
14.42 ft (4.40 m)
13.83 ft (4.22 m)
6.00 ft (1.83 m)
Hull appendages
Keel/board typecenterboard
Rudder(s)transom-mounted
Rig
Rig type
Sails
Sailplan
area72 sq ft (6.7 m )
/ area49 sq ft (4.6 m )
area160 sq ft (15 m )
Total sail area121 sq ft (11.2 m )
Racing
108.9
]

The Rascal 14 is an American sailing dinghy that was designed by Ray Greene and first built in 1961. [1] [2]

Operational history

External links.

The Rascal 14 design was developed into the slightly modified Rascal II. [1]

The design was built by Ray Greene & Company in the United States . The company built 3,000 examples of the design starting in 1961, but production had ended by the time the company went out of business in 1975. [1] [2] [3]

The Rascal 14 is a recreational sailboat , built predominantly of fiberglass , with teak wood trim. It has a fractional sloop rig with black-colored, hard-coated aluminum spars and a tabernacle-mounted mast . The hull has a spooned plumb stem , a vertical transom , a transom-hung rudder controlled by a tiller and a retractable centerboard mounted in an enclosed trunk. It displaces 400   lb (181   kg) and can be fitted with a 160   sq   ft (15   m 2 ) spinnaker . [1] [2]

The boat has a draft of 3.00   ft (0.91   m) with the centerboard extended and 11   in (28   cm) with it retracted, allowing beaching or ground transportation on a trailer . [1]

For sailing the design is equipped with a jib window and adjustable jib tracks. Foam flotation provides positive buoyancy and the boat has two storage lockers, one forward and one aft. [2]

The design has a Portsmouth Yardstick racing average handicap of 108.9 and is normally raced with a crew of two sailors . [2]

Sail magazine named the Rascal a "breakthrough boat", due to its intended role for beginners and first-time boat buyers. [2]

  • List of sailing boat types

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Thistle (dinghy)</span> Sailboat class

The Thistle is an American planing sailing dinghy that was designed by Sandy Douglass as a one-design racer and first built in 1945.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Lightning (dinghy)</span> Sailboat class

The Lightning is an American sailing dinghy that was designed by Olin Stephens of Sparkman & Stephens, as a one-design racer and first built in 1938.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Buccaneer 18</span> Sailboat class

The Buccaneer 18 , also called the Buccaneer dinghy and the Gloucester 18 , is an American planing sailing dinghy that was designed in 1966 by Rod Macalpine-Downie and Dick Gibbs as a one-design racer and day sailer. The prototype was first shown in 1967 at Yachting's "One of a Kind" Regatta, in which it placed second.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Jet 14</span> Sailboat class

The Jet 14 is an American sailing dinghy that was designed by Howard Siddons as a one-design racer and first built in 1952.

The Rhodes 22 , also referred to as the Rhodes 22 Continental , is an American trailerable sailboat that was designed by Philip Rhodes as a cruiser and first built in 1968.

The E Scow is an American sailing dinghy that was designed by Arnold Meyer Sr as a one-design racer and first built in 1924.

The Rhodes 19 is an American trailerable day sailer or sailing dinghy, that was designed by Philip Rhodes as a one-design racer and first built in 1958.

The Coronado 15 is an American sailing dinghy that was designed by Frank V. Butler as a one-design racer and first built in 1968.

The Cheshire 14 is an American catamaran sailing dinghy that was designed by Frank Meldau as a racer and first built in 1962.

The Skipjack 15 is an American sailing dinghy that was designed by Harry R. Sindle and Carter Pyle and first built in 1965.

The Designers Choice is an American sailing dinghy that was designed by Sparkman & Stephens as a sail training and racing boat and first built in 1978. It was Sparkman & Stephens' design #2349.

The AMF Apollo 16 is an American sailing dinghy that was designed by Canadian Bruce Kirby as a one-design racer and first built in 1977.

The Leeward 16 is an American sailing dinghy that was designed by Luger Industries and first built in 1962.

The Rebel 16 is an American sailing dinghy that was designed by Ray Greene and Alvin Youngquist as a one-design racer and first built in 1948.

The Dolphin 17 is an American trailerable sailboat that was designed by Glenn Corcorran and Murray Corcorran and first built in 1970.

The Cape Cod Mercury 15 , also called the Mercury Sloop and just the Mercury , is an American trailerable sailboat and sailing dinghy, that was designed by Sparkman & Stephens and first built in 1940.

The Herreshoff Eagle , also called the Herreshoff Eagle 21 , is an American trailerable sailboat that was designed by Halsey Chase Herreshoff as a cruiser and first built in 1976.

The New Horizons 26 is an American trailerable sailboat that was designed by Sparkman & Stephens as a cruiser and first built in 1958. It was Sparkman & Stephens design #1235.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Precision 15 CB</span> Sailboat class

The Precision 15 CB is an American sailing dinghy, that was designed by Jim Taylor and first built in 1995.

The Rhodes 18 is an American trailerable day sailer or sailing dinghy that was designed by Philip Rhodes in 1938 and first built in 1948. It is Rhodes' design #448.

  • 1 2 3 4 5 6 Sherwood, Richard M.: A Field Guide to Sailboats of North America, Second Edition , pages 44-45. Houghton Mifflin Company , 1994. ISBN   0-395-65239-1
  • ↑ McArthur, Bruce (2020). "Ray Greene & Co. 1947 - 1975" . sailboatdata.com . Archived from the original on 4 August 2020 . Retrieved 4 August 2020 .
  • Photo of a Rascal 14
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08-08-2010, 20:50  
Boat: 1974 Ray Greene Rascal II
to see what could possibly go wrong. Nothing terrible happened but I have a few questions that someone might be able to answer.

1. How can you possibly see the empty when backing down the launch ? I did a miserable job, much to the delight of the people who were waiting for me to clear the launch. I could only see the edge of one tire in one mirror and the post that holds the when trailering thru the rear window.

2. There seems to be no place to keep loose lines. They clutter up the small and are constantly getting in the way. There has to be a better way to store them. Velcro? Any Ideas?
10-08-2010, 14:27  
Boat: 1974 Ray Greene Rascal II
today and asked about them, thinking they may make it easier to see the trailer. Yep, that's what they were there for! They looked to be made out of the same PVC (CPVC?) tubing that is use for . Another solution might be to open the rear on the SUV, baring any problems with the trailer. I could also lower the tailgate on my truck with the same result.
 
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Boat Profile

A playful runabout

From Issue   Small Boats Annual 2007

R ASCAL sped across the riffled waters of Long Island Sound. Her mahogany foredeck glowed from the depths of its varnish, and her stainless-steel cutwater sparkled through drops of water streamlining into mist. Driver and passenger sat low on a simple rolled leather seat, legs stretched out nearly parallel to the cockpit sole. A tall person could reach over the side and touch the water as it rushed aft at better than 50 mph. Memories of my first ride in RASCAL still raise goose bumps after 15 years.

At 15′ in length and weighing about 1,000 lbs with a full fuel tank and cockpit, RASCAL is a cheeky little boat— “pleasantly mischievous” is one of the ways Merriam-Webster’s Unabridged Dictionary defines the name—powered by a 60-hp Mercury outboard. If Colin Chapman had designed and built boats instead of Lotus automobiles, a boat of RASCAL’s character surely would have been among them—the Lotus Super Seven of the waterways.

rascal 14 sailboat

Rascal, a 14’10” outboard runabout that you can build in the backyard, strives to capture the cachet of big mahogany speedboats—without their mechanical complications and great expense.

Designed and built by Kenny Bassett, Onion River Boat Works, RASCAL offers more bang for the buck than just about any other runabout a father and son could build over several hundred hours of nights and weekends. They will build her of plywood—4mm for the topsides and decks, 5mm for the bottom—ripped into strips 1″ wide and laid diagonally over frames and stringers. That’s the easy part. If they want to capture the gloss and romance of traditional mahogany runabouts, they’ll plank the topsides with 1⁄ 4″ solid mahogany, perfectly lined off and set in epoxy. Although this method taxes the skill and patience of an amateur builder, it’s far from impossible. In fact, Tom Donahue, an electrical engineer living in Connecticut, recently completed a Rascal. Before this project, he’d built nothing more demanding than a couple of birdhouses. Donahue knows, maybe better than anyone, that whoever builds a Rascal must let patience guide them throughout the project, especially during the varnishing. The finishwork will likely require as much, or more, time than the construction.

The final result, though, is worth the wait. RASCAL rides atop a shallow-V bottom. Her steep entry warps into a flat run and ends at the transom in a deadrise of about 7 degrees. A delta-shape pad keel from station No. 2 aft to the transom provides a perfect planing surface, allowing RASCAL to make the transition from displacement speed to full plane in a single heave—absent the “hump” we associate with deep-V hulls and their slightly shallower modified-V sisters. Chine flats emerge from the waterline at station No. 4, which corresponds with the forward edge of the cockpit. They rise gracefully and embrace the stem about halfway up the bow, forming a line that plays with light and shadow to create visual interest forward of the cockpit. These chines also deflect spray.

RASCAL’s exceptional proportions mask her size when she stands alone in the slip or speeds across the water. Only when she’s parked next to a larger boat does she reveal her compact dimensions. The outboard’s power head, like a welt on the forehead of Julianne Moore, may diminish our first impressions from exquisite to merely beautiful, but familiarity ought to heal the wound. Bassett was aware of this possibility, so he painted the cowling of the outboard on hull No.1. A lustrous solid black accented by the name RASCAL in chromed script made the power head an integral part of the design, further defining the boat’s character and purpose.

I’d met Bassett at the Riverside Yacht Club in the town of the same name located two train stops east of Greenwich, Connecticut. He’d traveled from New Hampshire to demonstrate the boat to a prospective buyer and invited me to join him for a test drive afterward. Bassett fired up the three-cylinder Mercury, which was still warm from his demo, engaged forward gear, and idled us into the channel.

rascal 14 sailboat

Powered by a 60-hp, Mercury outboard motor, RASCAL scoots along at better than 50 mph.

At rest and under slow way, RASCAL lightly tap-danced to the rhythm of cat’s-paws stirred by the breeze. This lateral motion is common to other runabouts I’ve driven and seems to be a characteristic of the bottom’s shape and the boat’s low center of gravity. I love this little dance, because it conveys a restless energy—the promise of speed. Most runabouts fulfill this promise, whether they are blindingly fast or simply pleasingly rapid.

Few powerboats involve us in their playfulness as completely as does a fine runabout, and RASCAL’s length and light weight intensify all of the sensations—save one: the rumble of an inboard engine, V-8, or straight-six barking epithets from the chrome tips of a through-transom exhaust. When I drove the original RASCAL, a 60-hp Mercury two-stroke outboard powered her, and I admit to being disenchanted by the ring, ding, ding voice coming from the transom. Sure, I knew better. I had road-raced two-stroke motorcycles in the late 1960s and early 1970s, and understood their potential to entertain the speed demon in all of us. I knew also that this lightweight outboard was the key to RASCAL’s personality.

Never mind Gar Wood’s neat 16′ Speedster inboard runabout or, to be more contemporary, Donzi’s lovely Sweet 16 sterndrive, only an outboard would give Bassett everything he wanted—simplicity of installation, ease of maintenance, purchase price, light weight and performance. Although outboard-powered classics never gained the cachet of their inboard sisters, they’ve written a richly colorful history for themselves in racing and more sedate forms of boating. In RASCAL, Bassett has combined the spirit of the all-conquering Switzer Craft hydroplanes and utilities with the look and presence of a Gold Cup raceboat.

After we cleared the mooring field and the no-wake zone, Bassett trimmed the outboard’s drive leg and pushed the throttle to the stops, sending us in a single rush to a speed of 50 mph. In the open water, RASCAL skimmed atop a foot or so of chop, doing her best imitation of a Lotus Super Seven tearing along a country lane in the north of England. Hard left, hard right, the little boat put her shoulder into the turns and carved perfect arcs. A tiny skid fin, at the leading edge of the planing surface and projecting to a depth of 2 3⁄4″ from the pad keel, helped RASCAL hold her line and speed in these turns. Without the fin, she would drift wide—her way of asking the driver to back off the throttle. We played until our faces ached with indelible grins and the electric tilt and trim on the outboard quit working.

rascal 14 sailboat

Designer-builder Ken Bassett drives RASCAL at speed. The playful runabout isn’t the easiest boat to build, but she rewards careful work with fine performance and head-turning appearance.

We met again later in the summer—this time on Candlewood Lake, near Danbury, Connecticut. This lake is an impoundment and is very narrow in many sections. Wind-blown waves and the wakes of powerboats bounce off the shorelines and march directly back toward the center of the lake. Picture the inside of a washing machine, the agitator of which moves rapidly up and down. Even during the week, motorboat traffic on Candlewood resembles the madness of I-95 between New Haven and Greenwich, so we looked for relatively quiet water to time her acceleration and top speed in fresh water. We recorded 2.7 seconds from 25 to 35 mph and a maximum speed of 52 mph.

My turn to drive. The cockpit is intimate, the steering wheel small, and the gauges are located in a panel at the center of the dashboard, similar to the arrangement in a 1952 Jaguar XK120. The seat is a paragon of simple design and construction, a pair of leather-covered foam cushions resting on nylon webbing. As drawn, the cockpit ought to accommodate a reasonable variety of human heights and widths. If I were going to build a Rascal, I’d figure out a way to make the seat adjustable fore-and-aft.

The unassisted cable-operated steering was quick, and RASCAL’s response nearly instantaneous. At first, the boat’s quickness startled me, so I eased back on the throttle until I got the feel of her handling. In those washing machine waters, she preferred staying on top of the conditions, so the faster we went, the smoother was her ride. RASCAL reacted predictably to changes in the outboard’s trim. Trimming in brought the bow down to engage the waves; trimming out raised the bow, transferring the load to her planing surface under the cockpit. She never porpoised, chine-walked, or tried to get airborne. One owner of a Rascal has clamped a heavily modified outboard onto the transom and regularly sees 70 mph. He has reported that she remains free of handling vices.

Like a pleasingly mischievous friend, RASCAL defies anyone to resist her charm, her playfulness, and friendly manners. She may not be the easiest boat to build, but rendering the two-dimensional drawings into all her wonderful three-dimensional shapes may make you as giddy as does driving her.

rascal 14 sailboat

Ken Bassett retired and closed Onion River Boatworks in 2017; there are no plans available for RASCAL. The review is presented here as archival material.

Is there a boat you’d like to know more about? Have you built one that you think other  Small Boats Magazine  readers would enjoy? Please  email  us!

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Comments (9)

I built Rascal in 1998. It was challenging but very rewarding and I also installed a 60HP Mercury. As I wanted to move on to other projects, I sold the boat. Some years later I completed a 26′ triple-cockpit runabout that I brought to a wooden boat show in Lake Hopatcong, N.J. where the same Rascal was on display!

Great article, inspiring. Thanks JP

I am currently building a Ken Bassett Rascal. I have talked to Ken several times for advice as well as the WoodenBoat community. Everyone was very helpful. I am a first-time boat builder with several years of WoodenBoat school classes to support my endeavor. I am enjoying the challenge. If you are building a Rascal boat or thinking about building, please reach out to discuss.

What do you estimate the cost of materials to be for this design? Could the boat be designed for two smaller outboards?

What a gorgeous little boat! I’m intending to build one as soon as I’ve finished fixing up a put-put I’ve restored, but the engine is a disaster. The Minister of Home Affairs has dictated this must be completed first! It’s called One Day which may give a clue to the directive. I’m in Australia, so talking with Ken may be an issue, is there an email address through which I could contact him?

A very dear friend purchased a Rascal that has the natural wood with a light-blue side accent color. What a pleasant surprise when he brought it to the lake. The gentleman who built it produced a fine piece of furniture. The workmanship is second to none. The wood absolutely glistens and the painted accent stands out. When he drives his Rascal along the shoreline, it has all of the embodiment of a classic runabout. The ride can only be stated as: EXHILARATING! You cannot appear graceful when boarding, but the payoff is a lot of fun on the water.

My dad built a 15′ Rascal in 1985 which we now must have valued for his estate. Would anyone be able to give me some idea as to the market value? It’s in excellent shape.

Where can I get plans for the Rascal?

The Rascal article was originally published in 2012 and we added this note to the end of it for this second appearance: Ken Bassett retired and closed Onion River Boatworks in 2017; there are no plans available for RASCAL. The review is presented here as archival material.

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Ray Greene Rascal help needed

  • Thread starter joeys
  • Start date Sep 8, 2020
  • Forums for All Owners
  • Trailer Sailors

My wife and I recently purchased an old Ray Green Rascal sailboat and have been fixing it up as needed. We are stuck trying to figure out how the centerboard should be mounted to the line that raised and lowers it. Does anyone had a picture of how it was originally connected? There is a metal piece that fits around the hole in the centerboard but there isn’t enough room on either side to actually put a bolt and but through there.  

I have a Ray Greene Rascal as well. The item that attaches to the centerboard consists of two small stainless steel straps that are riveted (somewhat loosely) to the centerboard. The flat-headed rivets allow this strap system to fit into the centerboard slot. The middle rivet also incorporates a small pulley-wheel to allow the line to pass through). See attached photo's. You will see the nylon pulley in one of the photo's. I've got lots of photo's of various details on this boat and am glad to offer up any info you might need. Once you get this on the water; stop by and say hi to my brother, who also lives on Lake Lanier (haha).  

Attachments

Centerboard Blocks.JPG

Mike Betts said: I have a Ray Greene Rascal as well. The item that attaches to the centerboard consists of two small stainless steel straps that are riveted (somewhat loosely) to the centerboard. The flat-headed rivets allow this strap system to fit into the centerboard slot. The middle rivet also incorporates a small pulley-wheel to allow the line to pass through). See attached photo's. You will see the nylon pulley in one of the photo's. I've got lots of photo's of various details on this boat and am glad to offer up any info you might need. Once you get this on the water; stop by and say hi to my brother, who also lives on Lake Lanier (haha). Click to expand

Might you still have your Rascal? If so, i am trying to figure out where the shrouds attach. I don't have pad eyes or chainplates and can't figure this out. Thanks!!  

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July / August Issue No. 299  Preview Now

rascal 14 sailboat

Motorboats - Outboard

14' 10" runabout, rascal.

A modified V-bottom, with constant deadrise in its after sections. Construction: Plywood and Mahogany over sawn frames. Alternative construction: Cold-molded, double laminated plywood. No lofting is required. Plans include 8 sheets.

Design Specifications

The WoodenBoat Store Post Office Box 78 Brooklin, Maine 04616 USA Phone: 1.800.273.7447

14' 10" Runabout, RASCAL profile

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In the water, rigged and ready to sail away Fiddlers Green is a T.

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  • Sailboat Guide

1981 14' Spindrift Rascal

  • Description

Seller's Description

Very easy to sail and super light Rascal Sailboat. Both jib and main sails are in very good condition. Super easy and fast to set up on the beach.

You can tow it with a regular sedan (super light construction).

Rig and Sails

Auxilary power, accomodations, calculations.

The theoretical maximum speed that a displacement hull can move efficiently through the water is determined by it's waterline length and displacement. It may be unable to reach this speed if the boat is underpowered or heavily loaded, though it may exceed this speed given enough power. Read more.

Classic hull speed formula:

Hull Speed = 1.34 x √LWL

Max Speed/Length ratio = 8.26 ÷ Displacement/Length ratio .311 Hull Speed = Max Speed/Length ratio x √LWL

Sail Area / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the power of the sails relative to the weight of the boat. The higher the number, the higher the performance, but the harder the boat will be to handle. This ratio is a "non-dimensional" value that facilitates comparisons between boats of different types and sizes. Read more.

SA/D = SA ÷ (D ÷ 64) 2/3

  • SA : Sail area in square feet, derived by adding the mainsail area to 100% of the foretriangle area (the lateral area above the deck between the mast and the forestay).
  • D : Displacement in pounds.

Ballast / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the stability of a boat's hull that suggests how well a monohull will stand up to its sails. The ballast displacement ratio indicates how much of the weight of a boat is placed for maximum stability against capsizing and is an indicator of stiffness and resistance to capsize.

Ballast / Displacement * 100

Displacement / Length Ratio

A measure of the weight of the boat relative to it's length at the waterline. The higher a boat’s D/L ratio, the more easily it will carry a load and the more comfortable its motion will be. The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more.

D/L = (D ÷ 2240) ÷ (0.01 x LWL)³

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds.
  • LWL: Waterline length in feet

Comfort Ratio

This ratio assess how quickly and abruptly a boat’s hull reacts to waves in a significant seaway, these being the elements of a boat’s motion most likely to cause seasickness. Read more.

Comfort ratio = D ÷ (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x Beam 1.33 )

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds
  • LOA: Length overall in feet
  • Beam: Width of boat at the widest point in feet

Capsize Screening Formula

This formula attempts to indicate whether a given boat might be too wide and light to readily right itself after being overturned in extreme conditions. Read more.

CSV = Beam ÷ ³√(D / 64)

Spin.: 160 sq. ft. A later, slightly modified version was available called the RASCAL II.

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Building, restoration, and repair with epoxy

Epoxyworks

The RASCAL Project

By steve gembrowski.

Cover Photo: Steve Gembrowski spent 10 years building the Ken Basset designed RASCAL, a mahogany runabout.

Fifteen years! Not that it took 15 years to build; it was more like a year and a half. I first saw a photograph of RASCAL and decided right then, if I ever build a boat, this is the one. RASCAL was a new design by Ken Basset for a modified V-bottom 14’10” runabout with a beam of 5’4″ and hull weight of 420 pounds. For the next 15 years, RASCAL became one of those projects sitting on the back burner, waiting until I had enough time and money to comfortably build her without having to compromise on engine, equipment or material. I’m sure plenty of builders out there can relate. My first step was to set the standard to which the boat would be built. Considering the time and money investment, the boat design, and the need to push my own skills, I set the bar high: Van Dam quality should do it. Van Dam Custom Boats  is a builder of fine mahogany boats in Boyne City, Michigan, whose 100 mph, 32′ runabout, Alpha-Z , was featured in a cover story in Epoxyworks 14 .

Pre-coating Rascal’s components

From the beginning, I sanded and triple-coated all components with WEST SYSTEM® epoxy prior to assembly. This process seemed to take forever, but I can only imagine the nightmare it would have been to coat and sand around all the frames and stringers, all those tight little areas up in the bow, while standing on a milk crate and bending over the sheer rail. Then to repeat it three times. The whole project would have ground to a halt right there. Pre-coat. You’ll save time in the long run.

I purchased LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber, which looks like plywood 2×10) from the lumberyard to use as a strongback, set up the framework, and then turned my attention to the 120+ notches that would need to be cut in the frames to accept the Sitka spruce stringers. I made up a simple jig, a plywood plate approximately 4″×6″ with a rectangular hole cut in the center. The opening in the plate was centered over the notch location and screwed to the edge of the frame. I placed a guide bushing on my plunge cut router, adjusted the depth, and cut each notch in three passes.

Back-up blocks were clamped to each frame to avoid chip-out. If you bevel the frames first, the bottom of each notch will automatically be cut to the same angle. However, I chose not to do this at this time and used a chisel to bevel the bottom of each notch, using the stringer as a guide. I also used this method to cut the notches in the white ash stem. After a little practice, I found I could install a complete stringer in about 25 minutes. Since the stringers were so closely spaced, I faired the entire framework with a board sander and an 8″ Dual Action (DA) sander with 40-grit, then 80-grit sandpaper. Then I coated all contact surfaces with epoxy.

Rascal's framework is faired and ready for plywood. Frames and stringers were coated and sanded before they were assembled.

Rascal’s framework is faired and ready for plywood. Frames and stringers were coated and sanded before they were assembled.

Installing plywood

The bottom was covered with ¼” okoume plywood and the topsides with 1 8″ okoume plywood.

This layer was epoxied and stapled in place with ¼” crown staples. I shot each staple through a piece of braided nylon handling material (used to band lumber together for shipping). This allowed for quick staple removal by simply grabbing the tail end of the strap with a pair of pliers and giving a quick sharp tug 90° to the hull surface. Caution: wear your safety glasses as some of the staples will go flying. I again faired the hull and applied two coats of WEST SYSTEM epoxy.

The finished hull interior before the floor and deck were installed. The bottom was covered with ¼" okoume plywood and the topsides with 1 8" okoume plywood.

The finished hull interior before the floor and deck were installed. The bottom was covered with ¼” okoume plywood and the topsides with 1 8″ okoume plywood.

Vacuum bagging the mahogany planks

Now the hull was ready for the ¼” Philippine mahogany. The plans called for the planking to be stapled along its edges approximately every 3″. In my mind, I envisioned a wooden boat that looked as though it had been assembled on a giant sewing machine. The next best thing was to try to match up about a thousand hole plugs, still not what I was looking for. I wanted a blemish-free surface totally free of fasteners. The only way to clamp the planking without making any marks was to vacuum bag it in place. Great…sounds simple enough, but how to bend the plank and hold it in alignment while setting up the vacuum? I would have to devise some type of non-penetrating fastener.

The bottom and topsides are faired and coated, ready for mahogany planking.

The bottom and topsides are faired and coated, ready for mahogany planking.

The fasteners ended up looking like 1″ by 1½” mirror clips, similar to those used to hold your bathroom mirror to the wall. These clips were made from scrap plywood, and since they would be under the plastic, the top edges were rounded off with a sander. I found that once one plank was butted tightly against another, using these clips along the “loose” edge was all that I needed to secure the plank. Prior to gluing and mounting the plank, I ran a strip of ½” double back tape around the perimeter of the plank being installed and made sure to seal down all the edges and overlaps tightly. Then I glued and clamped the plank. I then took a piece of ¼” nylon tubing and drilled small holes in it every 3″. I taped this loosely along the length of the plank. The tubing allowed the air to be removed from the extreme ends of the bag and was reusable.

Somewhere along the length of this tubing, I wrapped a piece of landscape fabric and taped it in place to form an “air bridge” from the tubing to the suction cup or vacuum port.

Each ¼" mahogany plank on the hull was clamped using vacuum bagging to avoid staples holes. An old dehumidifier compressor was rigged to pull up to 22" Hg .

Each ¼” mahogany plank on the hull was clamped using vacuum bagging to avoid staples holes. An old dehumidifier compressor was rigged to pull up to 22″ Hg .

A closeup of the vacuum port and the clip used to hold the individual planks in position until the vacuum took over.

A closeup of the vacuum port and the clip used to hold the individual planks in position until the vacuum took over.

I used builder’s plastic for the bag. (Note: use the clear plastic, not the milky white variety as this type is too slippery.) This plastic does not stretch very much, so I had to get real creative when taping the end of the bag. After the bag was in place, I made a small “x” cut in the plastic at the fabric location and covered it with the suction cup. Then I started the pump and checked for leaks. I had forgotten to mark my frame and stringer locations on the plywood and would occasionally miss the frame with the screw, causing a leak. By the time I found this out, I was already committed to the job and needed to plug the leak. To do this, I crawled inside the hull, listened, and then ran my finger along the frame hull joints until I found the leak. Then I packed the leak full of plumber’s putty or bubble gum, whatever I could come up with. After the epoxy cured, I cleaned up the plank edge with a trim router and moved on to the next plank.

To supply that suction, I needed a vacuum pump. After searching the internet, I found several commercial units, ranging from $100 to $300. I knew someone had to have a cheaper solution. One kit-plane builder had the answer. Turns out that the solution had been sitting in my garage for years. I had an old Kenmore™ dehumidifier. The fan motor was burned out, but the compressor was still good. On the opposite side of that compressor was a vacuum, and that’s what I was interested in. I have had this unit pull up to 22″ Hg (inches of mercury), which is over 1,600 lb per sq ft. (To find out how to build a vacuum pump, visit  The Cheap Little Sucker . Read all the links as they tell you what to look for when choosing a compressor. A good source for parts, vacuum gauge, suction cups, double-back tape, etc. is McMaster-Carr ; they offer fast service and excellent prices.)

Rascal’s interior

During the winter of 2004-2005, I constructed the interior, disassembled it, and brought it into the basement for finishing. I chose Interlux Goldspar™ polyurethane varnish for two reasons: 1) I wanted the scratch resistance of the hard finish and 2) Since dust was a constant problem, the hard finish allowed me to wet sand all the parts and then use automotive products to rub out and polish the final finish.

I lost some of the high gloss, but I also got rid of the dust flecks. This was a lot of extra work but worth it. I started sanding with 600-grit paper on a rubber block, very wet, then 800-grit, and finished with 1200-grit. All sanding and polishing have to be done within a single coat of varnish; if you sand through to a previous coat, no amount of polishing will make it blend and you will need to re-coat.

Rolling the hull to begin work on the deck was easy enough for three guys.

Rolling the hull to begin work on the deck was easy enough for three guys.

Deck construction used the same schedule as the topsides. The caulked seams were filled with WEST SYSTEM epoxy thickened with 406 Colloidal Silica Filler and then darkened with 423 Graphite Powder. This mixture was piped into each seam with a zipper-seal bag with a corner snipped off. Next, all deck hardware and stainless steel trim were fabricated, fitted, and installed. After the windshield brackets were installed, patterns were made for the ¼” Plexiglas™ windscreens.

After Rascal's floor was installed, the deck was framed. Spruce stringers will support 1 8" okume plywood.

After Rascal’s floor was installed, the deck was framed. Spruce stringers will support 1 8″ Okoume plywood.

After a slight bit of fairing, the ¼" mahogany planking was installed. By using the right-sized braces, the roof provided some strategic clamping pressure.

After a slight bit of fairing, the ¼” mahogany planking was installed. By using the right-sized braces, the roof provided some strategic clamping pressure.

When I was satisfied with all the fits, I removed everything and sent the windshield brackets and stem-head fitting off to the chromer. Be sure to send out this type of work as soon as possible; my work took five weeks and one part had to be sent back to be redone. Needless to say, that part was the last thing installed on the boat before launch.

Finishing Rascal

To finish the hull, I used Minwax™ oil stain, followed by a 6 oz layer of glass cloth and five coats of epoxy. Then I used six coats of Epifanes™ no-sand varnish and finished with two coats of Epifanes spar varnish. I found that I had to plane the sheer very carefully as the glass did not adhere as well as I would have liked. For that reason, I would not recommend the use of the Minwax oil stain under the epoxy. I used the same stain on the deck and there elected to go with an all varnish finish, 11 coats in all.

The RASCAL is a real head turner and gets a lot of attention wherever she goes. She took 1st place in the contemporary classic division at the 2005 Presque Isle Harbor Wooden Boat Show. The 4-stroke was initially a little heavy, which I corrected by mounting a hydrofoil to the engine. This made the trim much more effective throughout its range. Handling is very solid and predictable, with a top speed somewhere near 50 mph. Not bad for a fuel-sipping 60 hp motor.

Is she Van Dam quality? In my opinion, not quite. Then again, I’ve always been my own worst critic.

Rascal. Cover story, Epoxyworks #24

Rascal. Cover story, Epoxyworks #24

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SailInfo I boatbrochure.com

Rascal 14 Brochure

Original manufacturer / promotional brochure.

Date: 1960s Pages: 4 in B&W Size: 8.5 x 11 opens to 11 x 17 Condition: C8

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IMAGES

  1. Old Boats, Sailboat, Outdoor Gear, Tent, Sailing, Sailing Boat, Candle, Store, Sailboats

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  2. Picture 864 For Rascal 14 By Ray Greene

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  3. Rebel Rascal 14, 1980, Elkhorn, Wisconsin, sailboat for sale from Sailing Texas

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  4. 1973 14 foot Clark Boat Company C-LARK Sailboat for Sale in Aloha, OR

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  5. RDC Triangle Chapter

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  6. 1980 Spindrift Rascal

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  2. Battling the Storm of a Lifetime

  3. Rascal Flatts

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  5. "Majestic Cruise Meets Tiny Sailboat in the Stunning Seas of Portugal!"

  6. This Ambulance Ship can Evacuate People Quickly, Space Engineers

COMMENTS

  1. Rascal 14

    The Rascal 14 is a recreational sailboat, built predominantly of fiberglass, with teak wood trim. It has a fractional sloop rig with black-colored, hard-coated aluminum spars and a tabernacle-mounted mast. The hull has a spooned plumb stem, a vertical transom, a transom-hung rudder controlled by a tiller and a retractable centerboard mounted in ...

  2. RASCAL 14

    A boat with a BN of 1.6 or greater is a boat that will be reefed often in offshore cruising. Derek Harvey, "Multihulls for Cruising and Racing", International Marine, Camden, Maine, 1991, states that a BN of 1 is generally accepted as the dividing line between so-called slow and fast multihulls.

  3. Ray Greene Rascal 14; information request

    New Member. According to Harry Milling an employee and sailmaker for Ray Greene, Rascal and its bigger brother Rebel (16) were originally manufactured by Rebel Industries in Jackson, Michigan. Ray Greene was doing a college thesis in 1948 in conjunction with Owens Corning using honeycombed fiberglass.

  4. Rascal 14

    Rascal 14 is a 14′ 5″ / 4.4 m monohull sailboat designed by Ray Greene and built by Ray Greene & Co. starting in 1961. ... The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more. Formula. D/L = (D ÷ 2240) ÷ (0.01 x LWL)³ D: Displacement of the boat in pounds. LWL: Waterline ...

  5. Rascal 14 By Ray Greene ShortyPen Sailboat Guide

    Boat Name: Rascal 14: Manufacturer: Ray Greene: Hull Type: Daysailor: LOA: 14'5" (4.4m) Beam: 6'0" (1.83m) Weight: 400 (181.8kg) Ballast (kg) Keel Type: centerboard

  6. Review of Rascal 14

    The Rascal 14 is equipped with a centerboard keel. A centerboard keel is a pivoting lifting keel, allowing to sail both coastal and inland waters. The boat can sail close to the beach as the draft is just 0.28 - 0.38 meter (0.92 - 1.22 ft) dependent of the load.

  7. 1980 Spindrift Rascal

    Standard features. 14 Rascal by Spindrift 1980. One Design Centerboard Dinghy Fractional Sloop Rig Seats 4 adults. 6 Beam 3 Draft. ADDITIONAL: 14 Fractional Sloop Rig Mast Height 24 High Performance Features Generous Storage Under Foredeck Hand-Laid Fiberglass Exterior One Design w/Large Fleet Enclosed Bow Locker Foam Flotation Under Seats ...

  8. Sailing my 14' Rascal Dinghy

    Description: Sailing my 1960's vintage Rascal sailboat on a late summer afternoon. I would like to have captured some more exciting footage but this particu...

  9. 1960's Rascal 14'

    1960's Rascal 14' $1250. Length: 14' Beam: 6' Draft: min .92'/max 3' Hull: Fiberglass. Motor: No. Trailer: Yes. Description: A centerboard dinghy built by Ray Greene & Co. This model pre-dates hull identification numbers but it is likely from the 1960's. Perfect starter sailing vessel for a kid. Rascal come with sails and needed ...

  10. Specifications RASCAL 14

    RASCAL 14 Sailboat Data Hull Type: Centerboard Dinghy Rigging Type: Fractional Sloop LOA: 14.42 ft / 4.40 m LWL: 13.83 ft / 4.22 m S.A. (reported): 121.00 ft² / 11.24 m² Beam: 6.00 ft / 1.83 m Displacement: 400.00 lb / 181 kg Max Draft: 3.00 ft / 0.91 m Min Draft: 0.92 ft / 0.28 m Construction: FG First Built: 1961 # Built: 3000 Builder: Ray ...

  11. Rascal 14

    The Rascal 14 is a recreational sailboat, built predominantly of fiberglass, with teak wood trim. It has a fractional sloop rig with black-colored, hard-coated aluminum spars and a tabernacle-mounted mast. The hull has a spooned plumb stem, a vertical transom, a transom-hung rudder controlled by a tiller and a retractable centerboard mounted in ...

  12. PDF RASCAL 14'

    RASCAL 14' Length: 14' Hull: Fiberglass Beam: 6' Motor: No Draft: min .92'/max 3' Trailer: Yes Description: A centerboard dinghy built by Ray Greene & Co. This model pre-dates hull identification numbers but it is likely from the 1960's. Perfect starter sailing vessel for a kid. Rascal come with sails and needed equipment.

  13. 1974 Ray Greene Rascal 14 Shakedown Cruise

    Location: Pennsylvania. Boat: 1974 Ray Greene Rascal II. Posts: 10. 1974 Ray Greene Rascal 14 Shakedown Cruise. I took my 14' Ray Greene Rascal out today on a local lake for a shakedown cruise to see what could possibly go wrong. Nothing terrible happened but I have a few questions that someone might be able to answer. 1.

  14. RASCAL

    Rascal, a 14'10" outboard runabout that you can build in the backyard, strives to capture the cachet of big mahogany speedboats—without their mechanical complications and great expense. Designed and built by Kenny Bassett, Onion River Boat Works, RASCAL offers more bang for the buck than just about any other runabout a father and son ...

  15. Ray Greene Rascal help needed

    Mar 9, 2021. #2. I have a Ray Greene Rascal as well. The item that attaches to the centerboard consists of two small stainless steel straps that are riveted (somewhat loosely) to the centerboard. The flat-headed rivets allow this strap system to fit into the centerboard slot. The middle rivet also incorporates a small pulley-wheel to allow the ...

  16. Ray Greene & Co.

    Vixen. 1963 • 3.1 m. Founded by Ray Greene, one of the pioneers in the development of fiberglass boat construction. The company began with small sailboats. The most notable of these was the 16' REBEL. In 1957 the S&S designed NEW HORIZONS was introduced which became an instant success with almost 30 orders placed at ...

  17. 14' 10" Runabout, RASCAL

    14' 10" Runabout, RASCAL. A modified V-bottom, with constant deadrise in its after sections. Construction: Plywood and Mahogany over sawn frames. ... Publishing dynamic editorial content on boat design construction, and repair for more than 40 years. 1 YEAR SUBSCRIPTION (6 ISSUES) PRINT $39.95 DIGITAL $28.00 PRINT+DIGITAL $42.95 Subscribe.

  18. 1981 14' Spindrift Rascal

    This ratio assess how quickly and abruptly a boat's hull reacts to waves in a significant seaway, these being the elements of a boat's motion most likely to cause seasickness. Read more. Formula. Comfort ratio = D ÷ (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x Beam 1.33) D: Displacement of the boat in pounds; LWL: Waterline length in feet; LOA: Length ...

  19. The RASCAL Project

    I first saw a photograph of RASCAL and decided right then, if I ever build a boat, this is the one. RASCAL was a new design by Ken Basset for a modified V-bottom 14'10" runabout with a beam of 5'4″ and hull weight of 420 pounds. For the next 15 years, RASCAL became one of those projects sitting on the back burner, waiting until I had ...

  20. Rascal 14 Brochure

    Original Manufacturer / Promotional Brochure. Date: 1960s Pages: 4 in B&W Size: 8.5 x 11 opens to 11 x 17 Condition: C8

  21. Rascal Sail Data

    DetailsThe Rascal will move well in a light breeze but it is also rugged enough to handle heavy wind and surf. Plenty of room in the cockpit for four adults and comfort for the family. Very simple and easy to rig and can be towed by a compact car. LOA 14'5" LWL 13'10" Beam 8' Draft up 4", down 3' Total Sail Area 140 sq. ft. Main 100 sq. ft. Jib 40 sq. ft. Seating 4 adults Trailering Weight 400 ...