sailboat trailer weight

How Much Do Boat Trailers Weigh? 9 Examples (With Pictures)

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The answer to how much do boat trailers weigh varies, of course, depending on the size as well as the make and model of the trailer.

In this post, I’ll provide you with 9 common boat trailer examples. They will give you a feel for what each size will weigh.

Table of Contents

Let’s get started!

Average Weights & Sizes of Boat Trailers

As you can see, the weight of the trailer goes up as the length of the boat it can carry goes up.  However, this additional weight does not go up linearly.  This is because larger and heavier boats mean additional axles and stronger build materials.

As a result, the weight goes up more dramatically as the size of the boat goes up.

Here is a quick look at the numbers we found:

12 to 14-foot boat 400 pounds 150 pounds
15 feet boats 1,500 pounds 410 pounds
20-foot boats 6,000 pounds 1,000 pounds
18-foot boats 3,100 pounds 630 pounds
18-foot boats 1,800 pounds 420 pounds
22-foot boats 4,800 pounds 980 pounds
24 to 25-foot boats 6,425 pounds 900 pounds
25-foot boats 8,600 pounds 1,320 pounds
24 to 28-foot boats 7,000 pounds 1,630 pounds

As you can see, the trailer weight seems to correlate more with its weight capacity rather than the length of the boat that it will be carrying.

If you’re looking to tow a boat with a smaller vehicle, you’ll probably need to stick to boats under 13 feet long.  Otherwise, you’ll need to upgrade your tow vehicle to an SUV or truck.

Sometimes people buy boats that have never been trailered or that have lost their trailers.  Other times, people buy old boat trailers that they intend on using for newer boats.  Still other times, people buy older boat trailers so that they can repurpose them for another use.

Actual Weight And Weight Capacity Of Each Model

 1. the mcclain 12’ to 14’ single axle aluminum jon boat trailer.

sailboat trailer weight

This trailer is a single axle trailer that can hold a 12’ to 14’ boat.  It has a 20’ winch strap with a winch stand.  The overall length of this trailer is 15’6” and its tires are 8” each.

The trailer can hold 400 pounds and has a weight of 150 pounds itself.  A small trailer like this does not have brakes but it does have safety chains and lights. 

Since it is created with galvanized aluminum and it is not very wide, it does not weigh very much.

A person can easily tow this boat trailer with any vehicle that can support a 2” coupler.  In fact, many owners of sedans will be able to put bumper pull mounts on their vehicles so that they can tow a trailer and boat of this weight.

The reason for this is that most vehicles can tow up to 1,500 pounds and a 400-pound boat with a 150-pound trailer is still only going to weigh in at 550 pounds.

2. The Karavan Single Axle 1,500 Pound Drift Boat Trailer

sailboat trailer weight

This trailer is a single axle trailer that can hold boats of about 15 feet long.  It has an overall length of 192” and a width of 68” between the fenders.  From side-to-side outside the trailer’s fenders, you have a width of 85”.

The height of the trailer is 46” from the bottom of the tires to the top of the winch.

This trailer has a carrying capacity of 1,500 pounds but only weighs 410 pounds itself.  It sits on 13-inch tires and has a hitch ball size of 2”.

The trailer does not have brakes on it as it cannot be loaded very heavy.  You could technically tow this trailer with a boat with a smaller vehicle but I would recommend that you have at least a minivan or small SUV as 1,910 pounds without brakes could tax the brakes on a small sedan.

3. Load Rite Tandem Axle Catamaran Trailer

sailboat trailer weight

A catamaran trailer has to be wider than the average boat trailer.

This small 6,000-pound catamaran trailer has an overall width of 102” and a width of 82” between the fenders.

It has 13” wheels, a tongue jack, and trailer brakes.  It also has quick-slide bunk covers, a winch, and a winch stand.

This trailer weighs over 1,000 pounds by itself.  Anyone towing a catamaran with this trailer will want to have a large SUV or full-size truck.  They’ll also want a brake controller so that they can operate the included electric brakes.

4. The Karavan Single Axle 1,800 Pound Bunk Trailer

sailboat trailer weight

This trailer is meant for towing deep v boats as well as fishing boats.  It has an overall width of 90” and an overall length of 239”.  The width between the fenders is 72” and it can tow boats up to 18 feet in length.

The trailer comes with a winch and a winch stand that sits at 47” in height.  It has 13-inch wheels and a carrying capacity of 1,800 pounds.

Being made out of aluminum, the trailer only weighs 420 pounds by itself. 

This means that a person with a smaller vehicle could tow this trailer with a smaller boat.  An optional set of disc brakes can be added to this setup but people with larger vehicles may be able to skip the brakes altogether in most states.

Because of the narrow width of this boat trailer, novice boaters shouldn’t have a whole lot of trouble towing it.  This makes it a good trailer with a good trailer weight for people who are nervous about towing a boat.

5. The Karavan Single Axle 3,100 Pound Roller Trailer

sailboat trailer weight

This trailer is another single axle trailer that is capable of towing an 18-foot boat.  It has an overall width of 99” and an overall length of 266”.

The carrying capacity is 3,100 pounds and it weighs in at 630 pounds by itself.

The width between the fenders of this trailer is 80” and the bunks have been replaced with rollers.  This makes it a good trailer for easily launching deep v boats.  The rollers also make pulling the boat up with the winch much easier.

This trailer is constructed of welded tubular steel and it has an adjustable axle to help control the sway of the trailer.  It has 14” tires and a winch that stands at 52” high.

The brakes on this trailer are optional but you’ll probably need to have them added so that you can legally tow with it in your state.  This means you’ll also need to add a brake controller to your vehicle as well.  I’d suggest that you get an SUV or small truck to tow an appropriately sized boat on this trailer.

6. Karavan Tandem Axle 4,800 Pound Roller Trailer

sailboat trailer weight

This trailer is a tandem axle trailer with 14-inch tires.  It has an overall width of 99” and an overall length of 290”.  The maximum boat size you can put on it is 272” in length.

The width between the fenders is 80” and the height of the winch is 51”.  A standard 2” hitch ball size can be found on the tongue of the trailer.

You can place a boat with a width of up to 80” on the trailer weighing all the way up to 4,800 pounds.

The weight of the actual trailer is 980 pounds.

To pull this trailer with an appropriately sized boat on it, you’ll need a full-size truck or SUV.  You’ll also need trailer brakes which will need to be added to the trailer.

7. Venture Aluminum Boat Trailer

sailboat trailer weight

This boat trailer is built for boats from 24 to 25 feet in length.  It has a tandem axle with 15-inch tires.  Brakes come standard on the trailer but only on one axle.  This is enough to safely stop a trailer of this size and weight.

The carrying capacity of the boat trailer is 6,425 pounds and the actual weight of the trailer is 900 pounds. 

There are rollers on the trailer for easy loading and unloading of the trailer.

Only the largest of SUVs and full-size trucks will be able to tow a boat and trailer of this size.  Brakes are an absolute necessity and you’ll want a brake controller as the brakes that are included are electric brakes.

8. Karavan Tandem Axle Aluminum 8,600 Pound Bunk Trailer

sailboat trailer weight

This is a heavy-duty trailer meant to carry large boats of up to 8,600 pounds.

It has tandem axles with 15-inch tires and weighs in at 1,320 pounds.

The overall width of the boat trailer is 102” and the overall length of the boat trailer is 345”.  The maximum length of the boat is 327”.  The width between the fenders is 81” and the max-width at the bottom of the boat is 81”.

Bunks run along the sides and a tall 63” winch stands at the top.  Taller than the winch is the tall lighting system that stands at a height of 91”.

9. Magic Tilt Pontoon Series Triple Axle

sailboat trailer weight

This boat is a triple axle boat with a carrying capacity of 7,000 pounds.  The axles and wheels are galvanized and the winch stand is aluminum.

The total length of the boat trailer is 33 feet and the boat length that can be towed is between 24’ to 28’.  The width of the trailer is 102”.  This additional width is what allows the trailer to tow a pontoon boat.

The actual weight of the trailer is 1,630 pounds.  This means that between the boat and the trailer, you could be towing 8,630 pounds.  You’ll need a full-size truck to safely tow this boat and trailer.

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How Much Does a Boat Trailer Weigh? (Chart)

How Much Does a Boat Trailer Weigh? (Chart)

Most boat owners choose to have their own boat trailer instead of paying for expensive transportation. In such a case, crucial things are how much does a boat trailer weigh and do you have an adequate vehicle to tow it.

Always check whether your boat trailer setup fits the required weight class since you need to match your vessel size with its capacity. In other words, you will need a 200 pounds (90.7 kg) heavy trailer for a kayak, but some sizable boats require specific models. In such a case, you will need a trailer weighing over 1,500 pounds (680 kg).

Table of Contents

How Much Does a Boat Trailer Weigh?

Boat trailer weight, what is gcwr, trailer weight by boat type.

How Much Does a Boat Trailer Weigh

Determining boat trailer weight is the first thing you should do before buying. It is necessary to match it with both your vessel and the vehicle you will use to tow it.

The only way to know whether you have a vehicle strong enough to tow both a boat and trailer is to know their exact weight. Relying on averages often leads to unpleasant surprises.

15.3 feet

(4.7 m)

295 pounds

(134 kg)

62 inches

(1.57 m)

1,000 pounds

(453.5 kg)

Single-axle
15.3 feet

(4.7 m)

305 pounds

(138.5 kg)

62 inches

(1.57 m)

1,500 pounds

(680 kg)

Single-axle
17.17 feet

(5.2 m)

492 pounds

(223 kg)

88 inches

(2.25 m)

2,000 pounds

(907 kg)

Single-axle
18.17 feet

(5.5 m)

522 pounds

(237 kg)

96 inches

(2.45 m)

2,450 pounds

(1,111 kg)

Single-axle
18.17 feet

(5.5 m)

625 pounds

(283.5 kg)

96 inches

(2.45 m)

3,000 pounds

(1,361 kg)

Single-axle
19.7 feet

(6 m)

677 pounds

(307 kg)

96 inches

(2.45 m)

3,500 pounds

(1,587.5 kg)

Single-axle
20.7 feet

(6.3 m)

933 pounds

(423 kg)

96 inches

(2.45 m)

5,000 pounds

(2,268 kg)

Tandem-axle
27.75 feet

(8.45 m)

1,512 pounds

(686 kg)

96 inches

(2.45 m)

7,000 pounds

(3,175 kg)

Triple-axle

In most cases, trailers’ weight and capacity are directly proportional. The only exceptions are canoe or kayak trailers since their weight and capacity are identical.

You should be aware that a larger boat doesn’t mean you need a trailer with a higher weight and capacity. Plus, you should keep in mind that the boat’s gear weight is never calculated in the given measures.

Boat trailer weight

As you can guess, the boat trailer size will primarily depend on the boat size . You can use an online boat trailer weight calculator to get the rough estimation.

However, the best option is to ask the manufacturer about all four boat weight types necessary to determine the best possible trailer capable of carrying it.

It is the actual boat weight , without an engine and added liquids. You can find this value in the manual or ask the manufacturer for information.

This magnitude includes a standard-size engine and fuel weight besides boat weight. Be careful with this measurement, particularly if you plan to carry additional gear on the trailer.

Gross vehicle weight rating (package weight) is the max load your trailer can carry. Besides an empty trailer weight, GVWR also involves:

  • Boat weight

You can find this number on the VIN sticker at the trailer frame. Sometimes, there is one more number, the MAX GVCC (max trailer capacity). It is possible to calculate the empty trailer weight with a simple mathematical calculation:

GVWR – MAX GVCC = Empty trailer weight

For instance, your empty trailer weight is 950 pounds (431 kg) if the GVWR is 6,175 pounds (2,800 kg) and the MAX GVCC 5,225 pounds (2,370 kg).

Be aware that GVWR can vary, depending on added features, but legally towed load varies per state. Anything wider than 8.5 feet (2.6 m) requires an additional wide load permit in most states.

Manufacturers typically recommend avoiding exceeding 85% of the GVWR for security reasons. In other words, the load you want to carry should be less than 2,000 pounds (907 kg) if your trailer GVWR is 7,000 pounds (3,175 kg) and its dry weight 5,000 pounds (2,268 kg).

Tongue weight

It is the static force that the trailer tongue exerts on the hitch. Tongue weight shouldn’t be over 10% to 15% of the GVWR if you have a traditional trailer with a ball-mounted hitch.

So, tongue weight can max 300 to 450 pounds (136 – 204 kg) if your trailer is 2,000 pounds (907 kg) heavy and carries 1,000 pounds (453.5 kg) cargo.

If it is too low, you will face swaying the trailer tongue. Otherwise, you will overload your vehicle’s back tires when putting too much pressure on the hitch ball. In both cases, you will endanger traffic safety.

What Is GCWR

Gross combined weight rating is the max weight of the loaded trailer and vehicle, including:

Loaded vehicle

  • Vehicle weight

Loaded trailer

  • Trailer weight

You can find this number on the VIN sticker on the vehicle door, along with one more number, GVWR. Gross vehicle weight rating is the max weight that includes your vehicle, cargo, and passengers weight.

It is possible to calculate the maximum allowed loaded trailer weight with a simple mathematic calculation:

GCWR – GVWR = Max allowed loaded trailer weight

You need to know all these numbers to calculate correctly whether your vehicle can tow your new boat . If not, you will need to buy a smaller vessel or a more sizable truck.

You can buy a single-axle trailer for a boat less than 23 feet (7 m) long and weight under 3,300 pounds (1,497 kg). More sizable vessels require a trailer with two or three axles to provide more safety and stability.

Trailer Weight by Boat Type

As you can see, finding a suitable boat trailer is an important but pretty challenging task. You can roughly combine particular boat types with adequate trailers by classifying them into four groups to make things less complicated.

First group

In this group, you can find trailers for:

These small vessels’ dry weigh t is 800 to 1,000 pounds (363 – 453.5 kg), so you will need only a small, single-axle, 200 to 400 pounds (91 – 181.5 kg) heavy trailer.

Second group

In this group are most fishing boats , like:

These vessels need to have a sizable storing space for fishing gear so that you can expect a higher weight capacity. Their average weight is 1,000 to 3,000 pounds (453.5 – 1,361 kg).

The best option for such boats is a single-axle trailer weighing 300 to 600 pounds (136 – 272 kg). You can tow it with a truck, SUV, sedan, or minivan.

, canoe, kayak, PWC 800 to 1,000 pounds

(363 – 453.5 kg)

Single-axle, 200 to 400 pounds (91 – 181.5 kg) Truck, SUV, minivan, sedan, or compact
Bass boat 1,000 to 2,000 pounds

(453.5 – 907 kg)

Single-axle, 300 to 500 pounds (136 – 227 kg) Truck, SUV, minivan, sedan, or compact
Pontoon, saltwater fishing boat, ski boat, and motorboat 2,200 to 3,000 pounds

(998 – 1,361 kg)

Single-axle, 500 to 600 pounds (227 – 272 kg) Truck, SUV, or minivan
Bay and ski boats 4,000 to 6,000 pounds

(1,814 – 2,721,5 kg)

Tandem-axle, 800 to 1,000 pounds (363 – 453.5 kg) Heavy-duty truck or large SUV
Speed boat, sailboat, and cabin cruiser 7,000 to 10,000 pounds

(3,175 – 4,536 kg)

Triple-axle, 1,300 to 1,600 pounds (589.5 – 726 kg) Heavy-duty truck or large SUV

Third group

It includes:

You will need a large trailer with a tandem axle in this case. It needs to have an imposing capacity to carry these sizable, approximately 4,000 to 6,000 pounds (1,814 – 2,721,5 kg) heavy boat types.

The required trailer weight should range from 800 to 1,000 pounds (363 – 453.5 kg) in this case. Therefore, you will need a heavy-duty truck or large SUV to tow it safely.

Fourth group

Only the most sizable boat types come in this category, such as:

  • Cabin cruiser

Since they are 7,000 to 10,000 pounds (3,175 – 4,536 kg) heavy, you should use a heavy-duty truck or large SUV to tow them. As for the trailer , you will need a triple-axle, massive model weighing 1,300 to 1,600 pounds (589.5 – 726 kg).

Keep in mind that the boat and trailer combined weight can go up to 15,000 pounds (6,804 kg) in this case. Therefore, you need a sizable vehicle for towing them and safety chains to provide secure fastening without the possibility of swaying.

Once you decide to tow your boat, you need to check the weight of the boat trailer you want to purchase and align it with boat capacity and size. Never use average dimensions since your vessel may go beyond those presumed parameters. A better option is to do the math or ask a local boat dealer for advice.

Related posts:

  • Top 5 Best Boats For Shallow Water
  • What Is Draft On A Boat? Why Is It So Important?
  • Freshwater Vs. Saltwater Boating: What’s the Difference?
  • Freedom Boat Club Cost (Price Chart)

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This is a very informative article for me. It will definitely support me in selecting the best boat trailer for my cruising experience and transporting watercraft.

I think should tandem axle trailers or the Karavan tandem axle aluminum trailer for its amazing weight which varies from 800 to 1000 lbs.

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sailboat trailer weight

How Much Does A Boat Trailer Weigh? (With Examples)

Boat trailers come in all sizes, shapes, and weights. On average, a boat trailer weighs 600 pounds. The weight of the boat and the trailer combined can reach up to 6,000 pounds.

I will discuss the different factors you need to consider when buying a boat trailer and the average weight of some of the most common boat trailers in the market.

Common Boats and Their Boat Trailers

To give you a perspective of their weight, below is a table where you can find the types of boats, their average weight, and the average weight of the trailers that can carry them.

Boat TypeAverage Boat Weight in PoundsAverage Boat Trailer Weight in Pounds
Jon boats, canoes, kayaks800 to 1000200 to 400
Bass Boats1000 to 2000300 to 500
Pontons and motorboats2000 to 3000500 to 600
Saltwater fishing boats2200 to 3000500 to 600
Ski Boats4000 to 600800 to 1000
Sail Boats7000 to 88001300 to 1600

The length of the trailer is also a factor that affects its weight. Of course, the longer it is, the more metal was used in its construction. As such, it is heavier. The heavy boat trailers also need stronger and heavier wheels, and this also adds to the overall weight of the trailer.  

sailboat trailer weight

What vehicle can tow what?

Boat trailers weighing up to 400 pounds can be towed with sedans and compact cars. These boat trailers are light, but the largest boat you can put on them is a Jon boat. Typically, people use this type of trailer for kayaks and canoes.

Bass boats require trailers that are around 500 pounds, and you need a minivan or an SUV to tow them. A pick-up truck will also do.

For all the rest of the boat trailers that weigh more, you need a bigger SUV or powerful pick-up truck to pull them. Keep in mind that the trailer is not just the weight you have to consider but also the weight of the boat you are putting on it.

What makes boat trailers heavy?

Boat trailers are often made with a metal alloy. Some manufacturers use aluminium to make it lighter, but there is no doubt that these trailers are still heavy. Below are some of the factors that affect how heavy a boat trailer is.

The Size of the Trailer

Some trailers are bigger and wider than others. The reason being is that they are made for a specific kind of boat. For example, trailers for kayaks are thinner than trailers for jet skis and fishing boats. On the other hand, there are boat trailers for kayaks that can accommodate two kayaks side by side.

The Length of the Trailer

The length of the trailer is also a factor that affects its weight. Longer ones are built for longer boats, and they need more metal.

A boat that is 12 feet long will never fit in a kayak trailer that is between six and eight feet long. As such, there is more metal that adds weight to it.

On average, boat trailers that are 14 feet in length generally weigh around 150 pounds only. However, they can only carry a boat with a weight of 400 pounds.

The big ones, like trailers that span 28 feet in length, can weigh up to 1,600 pounds. However, they have much more power and can carry about 8,000 pounds.

The Material of the Trailer

The material used for the trailer is also a factor. Most manufacturers now use aluminium. It is not only lightweight but also resistant to rust and corrosion. However, there are still those that prefer traditional metal because it is stronger.

Today, there are many boat trailers made of stainless steel. It is a kind of steel that can also fight corrosion, but it does stain after so many years. Stainless steel is also heavier than aluminium and can be much more expensive.

Tips for Buying Boat Trailers

Before you buy a boat trailer, there are some things that you must consider. I have a few experiences myself about this, so I want to share them with you.

1. Check the gross vehicle weight rating

The gross vehicle weight rating is called GVWR. This number represents the maximum weight that the trailer can carry. I suggest that you do not even come close to it, as the metal may not be able to sustain the weight of that boat.

The GVWR already includes the weight of the entire boat. So, be careful about the boat’s weight. Some boat manufacturers tell you a boat’s weight, but that number does not include the weight of the engine. Take note that you must also comply with your country’s laws as far as weight limits are concerned.

2. Check the width of the trailer

The boat cannot rock left to right, or it will fall. The boat trailer must be wide enough so the gravity of the boat finds a balance on it.

In addition to all of these, you need at least 10 centimetres of space around the trailer once the boat is already sitting on top of it. This is the space you need to tie the boat on the trailer.

Before you buy, measure the width of your boat. If you cannot do this, consult the manual—it should be there. Make sure to ask an expert about this measurement. You can always rely on the seller of the boat itself to get some advice.

3. Decide which axle is appropriate

A single-axle trailer has one axle where the wheels are connected on each end. The trailer is attached to your car with supporting hardware.

A single-axle trailer is best for people who want an easy way to manoeuvre the trailer. A single-axle trailer is also a good idea if you want to take the trailer to a garage. Single-axle trailers are cheaper than double-axle ones, and they also need less maintenance.  

Dual-axle trailers are better if you are towing long distances. They are also safer to use because they are much more stable at highway speeds.

You need a dual-axle trailer if you are pulling heavy boats. These trailers usually weigh above 750 kilograms—some can weigh 6,000 kilograms!

4. Choose the make for the type of water

Although many boat trailers are made of aluminium and stainless steel, these are not your only options. You can make boat trailers made of galvanized steel.

These boat trailers are great for exposure to saltwater. Aluminium and stainless-steel trailers are great for freshwater environments. However, exposure to saltwater can result in corrosion.

5. Know the laws

Different states and countries have different laws about trailers. You cannot just attach a trailer to your vehicle and expect that a police patrol will not call your attention. In Florida, people must use trailers with brakes on all wheels of the trailer that is more than 3,000 pounds.

There are also laws about trailer lengths. At least where I am from, the maximum length for a light and simple trailer is 12.5 meters. The maximum height is 4.3 meters, and the maximum gross vehicle mass must be 3,500 kilograms.

Consult your traffic or vehicle department for this information. Do not believe in hearsay. The last thing that you want is to listen to somebody and then realize that he is wrong.

sailboat trailer weight

Towing a boat is not as simple as it seems. There are many types of boats and many types of trailers. Before you buy a trailer, you must take into account the type of boat that you will tow and the power of your vehicle.

You must also carefully study how you will put the boat on the trailer and make sure you comply with all safety standards when towing the boat.

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Boat Weights & Trailers: Types & Towing Tips

Ahoy, matey! Let’s dive into the fascinating world of boat weights, including 12 boat types, their lengths, and matching them with the appropriate trailers and towing vehicles.

You might be wondering, “How much does a boat weigh?”

Well, the answer isn’t quite as simple as you might think. Boats come in all shapes and sizes, and their weights can vary significantly depending on the type, size, and materials used.

In this article, we’ll explore the wide range of boat weights and discuss the types of trailers and vehicles you’ll need to tow your aquatic adventure machine. So, grab your life vest and let’s set sail!

Boat Type, Weight, and LengthAppropriate Trailer TypeAppropriate Towing Vehicle
(100-1,000 lbs, 8-20 feet)Single AxleSmall Car or Larger
(100-500 lbs, 10-20 feet)Single AxleSmall Car or Larger
(400-1,000 lbs, 8-12 feet)PWC TrailerSmall Car or Larger
(1,500-2,500 lbs, 16-22 feet)Single or Tandem AxleSUV or Larger
(3,000-5,000 lbs, 18-30 feet)Tandem AxleLarge SUV or Truck
(2,500-4,000 lbs, 18-25 feet)Tandem AxleLarge SUV or Truck
(1,500-5,000 lbs, 16-30 feet)Single or Tandem Axle, Depending on WeightMid-Sized SUV to Large Truck Depending on Weight
(6,000-12,000 lbs, 25-40 feet)Tandem or Triple AxleLarge Truck
(4,000-20,000+ lbs, 20-50+ feet)Tandem or Triple AxleLarge Truck or Specialized Transport
(30,000+ lbs, 40-100+ feet)Specialized TransportSpecialized Transport
(2,500-7,000 lbs, 20-35 feet)Single or Double AxleLarge SUV to Large Truck
(15,000-50,000+ lbs, 40-75+ feet)Specialized TransportSpecialized Transport

How Much Do Boats Weight by Type

  • Dinghies and Small Sailboats (100-1,000 lbs, 8-20 feet) These lightweight boats are perfect for beginners or casual boating enthusiasts. Due to their minimal weight, you can easily tow them with a small car or SUV. No need for a beefy truck or specialized trailer here! A simple single-axle trailer will suffice.
  • Aluminum Row Boats (100-500 lbs, 10-20 feet) Aluminum row boats are durable and lightweight, making them easy to transport. A small car or SUV can handle towing these boats with a basic single-axle trailer.
  • Personal Watercraft (PWC) (400-1,000 lbs, 8-12 feet) Jet skis and other personal watercraft are popular choices for those seeking a thrilling experience on the water. They’re relatively light, so towing them shouldn’t be a problem for most vehicles. A simple PWC trailer should do the trick.
  • Bass Boats (1,500-2,500 lbs, 16-22 feet) Bass boats are designed for fishing in shallow waters, and their sleek design allows for easy maneuverability. They typically weigh between 1,500 and 2,500 lbs, meaning a midsize SUV or truck can tow them with ease. A single-axle or tandem-axle trailer will work well for these boats.
  • Bowriders (3,000-5,000 lbs, 18-30 feet) Bowriders are versatile boats with an open bow area for seating. They’re perfect for a day of fun with family and friends. Weighing between 3,000 and 5,000 lbs, you’ll need a larger SUV or truck to tow these boats. A tandem-axle trailer will be the best choice for these vessels.
  • Cuddy Cabin Boats (2,500-4,000 lbs, 18-25 feet) Cuddy cabin boats offer a small sheltered area with limited sleeping accommodations, making them a popular choice for day trips and weekend getaways. They generally weigh between 2,500 and 4,000 lbs (dry), and a larger SUV or truck with a tandem-axle trailer is recommended for towing. Link leads to article dedicated solely to cuddy cabin boat weights.
  • Pontoon Boats (1,500-5,000 lbs, 16-30 feet) Pontoon boats are known for their stability and spaciousness, making them excellent choices for leisurely cruises or parties on the water. Depending on the size, you may need anything from a midsize SUV to a full-size truck for towing. A tandem-axle trailer is commonly used for these boats.
  • Cabin Cruisers (6,000-12,000 lbs, 25-40 feet ) Cabin cruisers offer a comfortable space for overnight stays and often come with amenities like a small kitchen and bathroom. Due to their size and weight, you’ll need a heavy-duty truck and a sturdy boat trailer with tandem or triple axles to tow these vessels.
  • Sailboats (4,000-20,000+ lbs, 20-50+ feet) Sailboats can vary greatly in weight, depending on their size, hull material, and rigging. Smaller sailboats weighing 4,000-8,000 lbs can be towed with a full-size truck, while larger, heavier sailboats may require specialized transport. A tandem or triple-axle trailer is necessary for these boats.
  • Yachts (30,000+ lbs, 40-100+ feet) Yachts are the epitome of luxury on the water. Due to their massive size and weight, they typically require professional transport, either by water or by specialized land trailers. Towing a yacht isn’t a job for your everyday vehicle!
  • Speedboats (2,500-8,000 lbs, 20-35 feet) Built for speed and excitement, these boats can vary significantly in weight. Smaller speedboats might be towed by a midsize SUV, while larger, more powerful models will require a full-size truck or even a heavy-duty truck to handle the load.
  • Houseboats (15,000-50,000+ lbs, 40-75+ feet) Houseboats are like floating homes, offering all the comforts of a house on the water. Due to their immense size and weight, houseboats usually require specialized equipment and professional services to transport them.

Understanding Dry Weight

When discussing boat weights, it’s essential to differentiate between a boat’s dry weight and its total weight when fully loaded.

The dry weight refers to the weight of the boat without any additional gear, fuel, or passengers. It’s the base weight of the boat, which includes the hull, engine, and essential onboard equipment.

However, dry weight does not account for the weight of items that are often added to the boat, such as personal belongings, provisions, or optional equipment.

image showing what is not include in a boat's dry weight

Heaviest Items to Consider

When calculating the total weight of your boat, it’s crucial to consider the weight of all the items you’ll be bringing on board. Some of the heaviest items that can significantly impact the total weight of your boat include:

  • Fuel: Gasoline and diesel fuel can weigh a lot, especially when you have large fuel tanks. Gasoline weighs roughly 6.1 lbs per gallon, while diesel weighs around 7.1 lbs per gallon. Take note of the capacity of your fuel tank and do the math.
  • Water: Drinking water and water for onboard systems (such as sinks and showers) can add a significant amount of weight to your boat. Water weighs approximately 8.3 lbs per gallon . Take note of the capacity of your water storage on board and do the math.
  • Waste Tanks: If your boat is equipped with a marine toilet and waste holding tank, the weight of the wastewater can also add up. This weight will vary depending on the size of your tank and how full it is.
  • Batteries: Each marine battery on board will likely add an additional 60-75 pounds.
  • Gear and Equipment: Items such as anchors, ropes, life jackets, coolers, ice, fishing gear, and other personal belongings can quickly add weight to your boat.
  • Passengers: Don’t forget to account for the weight of passengers and pets when calculating your boat’s total weight.

When determining the towing capacity required for your boat, it’s important to consider the total weight, including all the additional items you’ll be carrying on board. By taking these factors into account, you’ll be better prepared to safely tow and operate your boat within its specified weight limits.

Boat Trailer Weight Ranges Based on Axles

Boat trailers come with different axle configurations that affect their weight capacities. The number of axles determines the overall weight a trailer can safely carry. Here’s a general overview of boat trailer weight ranges based on the number of axles:

  • Single-Axle Trailers: Single-axle trailers are typically designed for smaller boats and have a weight capacity ranging from 1,500 to 3,500 pounds. They’re suitable for towing lightweight boats such as aluminum fishing boats, jet skis, or small sailboats. Single-axle trailers are generally more maneuverable, easier to handle, and more cost-effective than trailers with multiple axles.
  • Tandem-Axle Trailers: Tandem-axle trailers, which have two axles, offer increased stability and can handle larger, heavier boats. These trailers can typically support boats weighing between 3,500 and 7,000 pounds. Tandem-axle trailers are ideal for towing medium-sized boats like ski boats, pontoon boats, or small to mid-sized cabin cruisers.
  • Tri-Axle Trailers: Tri-axle trailers feature three axles, providing even more stability and support for larger, heavier boats. They can typically accommodate boats weighing between 8,000 and 18,000 pounds or more. These trailers are suitable for towing large boats such as houseboats, larger cabin cruisers, or yachts.

It’s essential to choose the right trailer for your boat based on its weight, including the additional weight of gear, fuel, and water. Always consult the trailer manufacturer’s specifications and recommendations to ensure safe and proper towing.

image of author's tandem-axle trailer for his cuddy cabin boat.

Common Vehicle Types and Their Towing Capacity Ranges

Different vehicles have varying towing capacities, which determine the maximum weight they can safely tow. Here’s a general breakdown of common vehicle types and their towing capacity weight ranges:

  • Compact Cars: Most compact cars have a limited towing capacity of around 1,000 to 2,000 pounds . These vehicles are suitable for towing small boats, such as jet skis or aluminum rowboats.
  • Sedans: Midsize and full-size sedans typically have a towing capacity ranging from 2,000 to 3,500 pounds . This allows them to tow small boats like aluminum fishing boats, small sailboats, or lightweight personal watercraft.
  • Crossovers and Small SUVs: Crossovers and small SUVs usually have a towing capacity between 3,000 and 5,000 pounds . This capacity makes them suitable for towing small to medium-sized boats, such as bass boats, ski boats, or smaller speedboats.
  • Midsize and Full-Size SUVs: These vehicles have a higher towing capacity, generally between 5,000 and 8,000 pounds . Midsize and full-size SUVs can tow larger boats, like cabin cruisers or cuddy cabin boats, and may even be able to handle some pontoons and wakeboarding boats.
  • Pickup Trucks: Pickup trucks are known for their powerful engines and substantial towing capacities. Light-duty pickup trucks can tow between 5,000 and 12,000 pounds , while heavy-duty trucks can handle anywhere from 12,000 to 30,000 pounds or more . These trucks are capable of towing larger boats, such as larger cabin cruisers, houseboats, and even some yachts.

It’s crucial to consult your vehicle’s owner’s manual or contact the manufacturer to verify the specific towing capacity of your vehicle. Remember that towing a boat safely requires a combination of the right vehicle, proper trailer, and appropriate hitch.

Also remember that once you get to the water you’ll be backing up your vehicle down a ramp and into the water, so you’ll need the brakes and vehicle capability of dealing with that. It’s not just highway driving that you need to think about.

image of a truck towing a tri-axle trailer with a cabin cruiser down the highway.

Final Takeaways

The weight of a boat can vary greatly depending on its type, size, and materials used in its construction. When towing a boat, it’s essential to have the appropriate trailer and vehicle to ensure safe and efficient transportation. By understanding the different boat weights and towing requirements, you’ll be better equipped to choose the perfect setup for your aquatic adventures.

Happy Boating!

sailboat trailer weight

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How Much Does a Boat Trailer Weigh? – A Boater’s Guideline

Written by Anthony Roberts / Fact checked by Jonathan Larson

how much does a boat trailer weigh

Determining boat trailer weights is important before purchasing this piece of equipment as it relates deeply to your tow vehicle’s capacity to commute safely while pulling the vessel on the road. This has never been an easy task but to select the suitable trailer for your boat, researching its weight is a must!

Different types of trailers have varied weights, so there is no specific boat trailer weight, which makes many boaters confused while deciding the right trailer for their vessel. To buy the perfect boat trailer, it is essential to understand exactly what kinds of weights are available in a trailer.

If you are seeking answers for those problems, this article on how much does a boat trailer weigh is definitely made for you. In this post, I will provide detailed definitions and information related to boat trailer weight so you can have a better understanding.

This knowledge will definitely support you in selecting the best boat trailer for your cruising experience and transporting watercraft. Moreover, some further notices about boat trailers and tips to deal with boat trailers in real situations will be included throughout the discussion, so make sure to follow it until the end!

boat-and-trailer-weight-chart

Table of Contents

Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR)

Tongue weight, truck scale – a simple option, bathroom scale – a diy option, group 1: pwcs and jon boats trailers, canoe trailers, kayak trailers, group 2: fishing boats including: bass boats, pontoon boat, ski boats, group 3: ski boats and bay boats, group 4: speed boats and cabin cruisers, definitions of boat trailers weights and sizes.

weight-of-boat-trailer

Similar to a usual travel trailer, a boat trailer weight consists of different aspects, which contribute to the trailer’s total weight. Understanding these elements will help you to manage the trailer weight and guarantee safety while traveling with your craft.

These phrases may come up when you are looking at boats, and it is crucial to know them when estimating how much boat weight your car and trailer can tow. Manufacturers may differ slightly in what is included for these trailer weight estimates.

However, they all take into account essentially the same components, and none of them incorporate the weight of your boat’s gear. In a minute, we’ll get into more detail regarding adding gear weight, but first, let’s define some terms:

The dry weight of a boat is the actual weight of the boat alone, without any liquids or motor. The manufacturer provides the dry weight. When figuring out how much your boat weighs, start here—the base boat with nothing extra.

Your boat’s wet weight includes fuel and a standard-size motor. We suggest you examine this factor carefully to see whether this weight is within your trailer’s towing capability, especially for an angler who is likely to carry light cargo and no additional luggage.

When your boats are completely full with engine, fuel, water, other gears and placed on a loaded trailer, this is the average boat weight with trailer. The gross trailer weight might vary depending on added features and the quantity of goods it can carry.

GVWR figure will be the maximum packed trailer weight you can carry. What you may legally tow varies by state, but anything wider than 8.5′ wide in most states requires a wide load permit. To maintain safety while trailering, it’s generally suggested to not exceed 85 percent of the trailer’s GVWR.

The static force produced on the hitch by the trailer tongue is known as tongue weight. For traditional trailers featuring ball-mounted hitches, the tongue weight should be about 10% to 15% of the total packed trailer weight. If a 1,000-pound cargo is put into a 2,000-pound standard trailer, the tongue weight of the filled trailer must be around 300 and 450 pounds.

The trailer tongue may sway from side-to-side when there isn’t enough weight and makes it challenging to drive. If you place too much pressure on the hitch ball, however, the force can overload the towing vehicle’s back tires and cause it to spin.

How to Weigh a Boat Trailer? – A Simple and Detailed Tutorial

boat-trailer-weights

As I have mentioned above, tongue weight plays an important role in your trip to the beach or river while transporting a vessel at the back. It is a common belief among boaters that the weight of the trailer tongue on the hitch is something that every trailer owner should be aware of. Therefore, in this part, we will discuss some methods to measure a boat trailer.

For a nominal price, most commercial truck scales will weigh trailered boats. Pull the vehicle onto the scale with the trailer still attached, but with the trailer’s wheels removed while it is placed on the boat trailer weight calculator.

Let’s suppose your average boat trailer weight is 4,600 pounds. Drive off the scale, detach the trailer, and return to the scale to weigh the truck alone; let’s assume it weighs 4,200 pounds. The tongue weight is the difference (4,600-4,200=400). If you don’t have access to a truck scale, you may calculate tongue weight in your driveway.

With this method, you will scale the trailer tongue by yourself. To do so, you will need to prepare some necessary items:

  • Bathroom Scale
  • 4 X 4 beam and scraps
  • Concrete Paver
  • 2 Pieces of Pipe

After preparing all these tools, follow the instructions below to calculate the boat trailer weight:

To begin, secure the trailer tires using chocks. Setting up your beam in a simple 3-to-1 ratio, or 4-to-1 if it’s a hefty trailer, will allow you to precisely estimate the tongue weight. You should have at least a 4-foot-long beam for a 4 to 1 ratio.

Place one end of the scale on the paver and the other on another paver. To function as a pivot, install one piece of pipe transverse to the beam on top of the paver. Carry on with the other item on the scale in the same technique.

Place the beam one foot away from the pipe and closest to the paver where it sits. This is where you’ll lay the trailer’s tongue on a second block of wood. The aim is to get the tongue level like it would be on a trailer hitch.

In this step, measure three feet over from the previous mark and position the other piece of pipe crosswise beneath the beam. Place the trailer’s tongue on the first mark. You’ve now evenly divided the weight so that the paver weighs more than the scale.

In reality, the paver bears three times the weight of the scale, therefore increasing the scale’s value by four to get an accurate reading. There’s also the tongue’s weight to consider.

Specifications of Boat Trailers With Examples

Selecting the suitable boat trailer for your craft is considered one of the most vital yet difficult missions for any boat owner. From calculating the vessel’s average weight to scaling the total weight of the trailer, there are many small tasks to perform to find the perfect trailer with an exact weight fitting the boat.

Since it is very easy for you to be confused with the variety of boat and trailer in the market, I will provide to you a boat and trailer weight chart which concludes specifications of each boat and their trailers as well as break these figures down for a better understanding, so make sure to keep up till the end!

This group consists of boats with dry weight lying between 800 and 1000 lbs, which are quite lightweight compared to other kinds of vessels. Therefore, a small trailer whose trailer weights are around 200 to 400 lbs will be an appropriate choice.

In particular, single axle boat trailer weight is the most suitable weight and single axle trailer has the specification that fits the average weights of crafts like canoes or kayaks.

This group of vessels is usually purchased for the fishing purpose. Hence, they have bigger designs and greater weight capacity. Nevertheless, each of these heavier boats can still be carried by a trailer that obtains a small boat trailer weight, and single axle is one of them.

Moreover, in terms of tow vehicles, transportations like SUVs, trucks, or minivans are potential selections that you can always take into consideration.

These two types of boat are often categorized as ships because of their sizes. As a result, a trailer with a large structure and impressive carrying capacity should be chosen in this case. I highly recommend tandem axle trailers or the Karavan tandem axle aluminum trailer for its amazing weight which varies from 800 to 1000 lbs.

As this is the biggest type of boats in the chart, not only do they need to be towed by massive vehicles, such as heavy duty trucks or large SUVs but triple axle trailers should also be utilized to carry these watercrafts on the road.

Since the combined weight of boats and trailers of this type can reach the figure of 15,000 lbs, it is necessary for boaters to connect safety chains for better safe towing. In this case, Chervolet Tahoe, an enormous American muscle SUVs may be a great choice.

When determining the weight of boat trailers, it’s critical to go beyond the overall dry weight. After all, other elements like boat size, capacity, and vehicle ratings will be linked to the weight of a boat trailer.

We hope that the above information and suggestions can help you determine your boat trailer weight. You should have no trouble getting beyond weight issues with your trailer if you understand the basic weight physics and how they are connected. Besides, if you care about the weight of a bass boat , you can check it out on boat trailer accessories .

Did you enjoy the article on how much does a boat trailer weigh ? Do you want to add anything else? Please let me know and leave a comment below.

Anthony-Roberts

Ten years of enjoying countless trips on boats never made me love them any less! So I am here to put all those experiences into good use for other boaters who want to have a safe and fun trip with their friends and families.

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How Much Does a Boat Trailer Weigh?

Ian Fortey

The average fishing boat trailer weight will probably be around 600 lbs. There can be a fairly large potential range for these trailers however, running from just a couple of hundred pounds at the low end to well over 1,000 pounds at the higher end of the scale. And that’s for an unloaded trailer. Once a boat has been loaded on a boat trailer could easily exceed 10,000 pounds. This will all depend on the size of both the trailer and the boat being loaded onto it, of course.

Average Boat Trailer Weights

sailboat trailer weight

It’d be all but impossible to list every potential boat trailer weight here because there are so many models and sizes and they’ve been around for years. But we can at least narrow down the field a bit to give you an idea of what kind of trailer pairs with what kind of boat and how much they all weigh.

Small Boats

This can be anything from a personal watercraft to a kayak to a smaller jon boat . Basically any boat that has an average weight under 1,000 pounds is going to qualify as a smaller vessel. These boats are towed on small, single axle trailers that likely weigh between 200 and 400 pounds max. Anything larger is a bit of overkill. Kayak trailers can often carry several boats.

Medium Small Boats

A medium small vessel would be something like a bass boat , a larger jon boat and other smaller fishing vessels . They’ll weigh between 1,000 lbs and up to 2,000 pounds in total. These can still be towed with a single axle trailer but it’ll be a bit larger than the kind meant for the smaller boats. Expect a weight between 300 lbs and 500 lbs.

Medium Boats

A saltwater fishing boat could fit into this category, as well as a pontoon boat or a ski boat . You’re looking at 2,000 to 3,000 lbs here. This would be the largest size boat that a large single axle trailer could handle, typically one that weighs about 500 to 600 lbs.

Medium Large Boats

Taking things up a notch to boats that weigh as much as 4,000 to 6,000 pounds. That could be a center console boat , a smaller cabin cruiser, a bay boat and so on. These boats require a double or tandem axle trailer, one that weighs around 800 to as much as 1,600 lbs.

Large Boats

The largest boats that you’re apt to tow with your own tow vehicle are things like cabin cruisers, sailboats and some larger fishing and speed boats. These weigh as much as 7,000 to 9,000 lbs. You need a triple axle trailer to safely haul these, one that can weigh 1,300 to 1,600 pounds. This is about as big as a boat trailer is going to get, at least in terms of ones that you could safely tow with a heavy duty truck or SUV.

Remember, these are all dry weights so if you have gear and fuel on board you’ll need to adjust for that as well. It’s much too hard to do averages for things like that because we obviously have no way of knowing how much fuel you might have on board and because boat motors can range so much in size from one to another. Just remember to do the math to add in that weight when figuring the total weight for your trailer.

Determining Boat Weight for your Trailer Weight

sailboat trailer weight

Boat weight can be listed in three different ways when you’re trying to determine if your trailer has the capacity to carry it. Boats will be listed with both a dry weight and a wet weight. Dry weight is the boat as is. Wet weight is the boat with a motor and fuel added, which can add a considerable amount. All of that together with your trailer included is now the package weight of the entire boat and trailer together.

If you’re adding a fueled boat to a trailer, remember to add about 6 lbs per gallon of fuel on board to the total weight. Gear, electronics, coolers and so on are all added weight not included in the proper weight of the boat as well, so make sure you’re adding that in to determine the total weight of your trailer when towing your boat.

Weight by Axle

sailboat trailer weight

You will likely be using a single, double or triple axle trailer to tow your boat.

  • Single axle trailers weigh under 600 lbs but can carry about 3,300 lbs for a maximum weight that you’ll be towing of about 4,900 lbs
  • Tandem axle trailers weigh from 600 lbs up to 1000 lbs and have the ability to handle boats that weigh between 3,300 lbs to as much as 8,000 lbs. That means, on the low end, a double axle trailer could weigh as little as 3,900 lbs to as much as 9,000 lbs.
  • Triple axle trailers weigh anywhere from 1,000 lbs to 1,600 lbs. They are designed to haul boats that weigh 8,000 to 10,000 pounds. That means the package weight of a boat and triple axle trailer could be anywhere from 9,000 lbs to 11,600 lbs.

There are larger trailers out there, obviously. There are boats that weigh many thousands of pounds more than what we have listed, and trailers that weigh more. However, larger trailers require larger rigs and permits for towing. Remember, in your personal truck you need to have the weight capacity to tow a larger vehicle and that is determined by a number of factors. It’s not just have the engine torque for it. Your hitch or ball mount need to be up to the task as well. Your vehicle owner’s manual should be able to detail exactly what it can safely tow.

If you know your gross vehicle weight rating, you can determine how heavy a trailer you can tow.

What is a Gross Vehicle Weight Rating?

sailboat trailer weight

Every trailer and tow vehicle has a gross vehicle weight rating or GVWR. The gross vehicle weight rating is the maximum weight the loaded trailer is rated to carry. Always err on the side of caution when figuring this out and add 15% to whatever you think the gross trailer weight is. Meaning if you think your boat weighs 1000 lbs, calculate it at 1150 lbs just to be safe.

Your tow vehicle’s GVWR is the maximum weight of your vehicle loaded down. To figure out what you can tow behind your vehicle you need your GCWR or gross combined weight rating. That’s the weight of the boat, the trailer, the truck and all your gear. Look inside your driver’s side door and there should be a sticker on the frame that lays out the GCWR. You need to subtract your vehicle’s GVW from the GCWR. The number you’re left with is how much your trailer and what you haul with it can weigh. If your boat trailer’s weight is greater than that number, it is not safe to try to tow it.

Laws About Boat Trailers

Now it’s one thing to have the ability to tow a boat trailer, it’s another to be legally able to do it. Always check to make sure if you’re towing something on the larger end of the scale. Smaller boats should be no issue at all but many states have rules when it comes to boat trailers if the load is too wide or too high. Sometimes we forget when focusing on boat weight that there may be other concerns. You may need a permit if your boat trailer is over 8.5’ wide. This may apply if the boat is over 13.5’ high as well.

How Do You Figure Out Trailer Weight?

sailboat trailer weight

It’s all fine and good to say a boat trailer may weigh between 200 lbs and 1,000 pounds but, in practical terms, that’s very useless information to you. If you didn’t learn the weight of your trailer when you bought it, you may need to get an exact figure to safely tow your boat. The last thing you want to do is overtax your tow vehicle and potentially end up with some seriously expensive engine repairs.

The easiest way to figure out weights for trailers is to just go weigh them. You can take your trailer to a CAT scale or a weigh station and get a precise weight so you know what you’re working with. This should only cost a few dollars and there’s  even a CAT scale app you can use to track down the nearest scale if you’re not sure where to go.

The Bottom Line

There are a lot of variables that go into determining what boat trailers weigh. You need to decide if you mean an empty or loaded boat trailer as well. In general, the longer the boat, the longer the trailer, the greater number of axles and the heavier everything gets. The smallest of boat trailers may weigh just a couple of hundred pounds on their own while the largest, when fully loaded, can weigh well over 5 tons. If you’re unsure about your towing capacity, always err on the side of caution. Add 15% to the weight when you’re estimating, and calculate your vehicle’s towing capacity to ensure the trailer doesn’t weigh too much. For the most exact weight, take your trailer to a weigh station or CAT scale.

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My grandfather first took me fishing when I was too young to actually hold up a rod on my own. As an avid camper, hiker, and nature enthusiast I'm always looking for a new adventure.

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Jack Ducan on February 12, 2023

It’s good to know what my boat trailer weighs, it allows me to manage the trailer weight and guarantee safety while traveling with your craft.

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How to Weigh a Boat Trailer

  • Nov 8, 2021

So you need to weigh your boat trailer. Maybe it’s for registration purposes (similarly to a utility trailer ), or maybe it’s to make sure you don’t overload your rig (similarly to a roof rack or SUV ) for a safe trip. 

So, how do you weigh a boat trailer? Well, there are a number of ways to make the weighing magic happen, and in this article, we’ll cover all the different ways to get the job done. 

While you’re on the topic of your boat trailer weight, you should also think about its safety on the road, and consider installing a backup camera . Camera Source has the backup cameras and front and side cameras that make loading, hitching, hauling, launching, and parking your vehicle and boat trailer safer and easier. Keep reading for more tips and tricks to make loading your boat trailer safe and easy. 

sailboat trailer weight

Option 1. Calculate Boat Trailer Weight Based on Capacity Plate

Your boat trailer should have a capacity plate listing the Maximum Capacity, Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR), and Gross Axle Weight Rating (GAWR). According to Boat.U.S. , it should look something like their below example:

sailboat trailer weight

To find the weight of the trailer, simply subtract the trailer’s maximum capacity from the GVWR and you're left with the weight of the trailer. 

On average, boat trailers weigh anywhere from 200 lbs to 1,600 lbs.

  • Single-axle boat trailers typically weigh up to about 600 lbs and have a capacity up to about 3,300 lbs.
  • Tandem-axle boat trailers usually weigh up to around 1,000 lbs. Some tandem-axle trailers can support boats up to around 8,000 lbs, but this is the weight at which you'd consider a triple-axle trailer.
  • Triple-axle trailers usually weigh between 1,000 and 1,600 lbs. These trailers are designed for heavy-duty boats around 8,000 lbs to 10,000 lbs.

If you’re uncertain about your calculation, here are average boat trailers weight and capacity by size for a frame of reference: 

12 to 14-foot boat

400 pounds

150 pounds

15 feet boats

1,500 pounds

410 pounds

20-foot boats

6,000 pounds

1,000 pounds

18-foot boats

3,100 pounds

630 pounds

18-foot boats

1,800 pounds

420 pounds

22-foot boats

4,800 pounds

980 pounds

24 to 25-foot boats

6,425 pounds

900 pounds

25-foot boats

8,600 pounds

1,320 pounds

24 to 28-foot boats

7,000 pounds

1,630 pounds

If you’re skeptical of the capacity plate and math skills to determine your boat trailer weight, then it’s time to weigh it. 

Option 2. Weigh Your Boat Trailer on a Truck Scale

The simplest and fastest way to weigh a boat trailer is to take it to a truck scale. Locations capable of weighing trucks and boat trailers include but may not be limited to:  

  • Truck stops 
  • Weigh stations
  • Junk yards 
  • Landfills 
  • Gravel yards 
  • Freight yards 
  • Grain elevators 
  • Grain and feed stores 
  • CAT scales 

Many locations have the ability to weigh your trailer, just make sure you call ahead first to ensure that they have the availability so you can weigh it. 

Option 3. How to Weigh Your Boat Trailer at Home

If you don’t have a weigh station nearby, don’t worry, you can also weigh your trailer with, funnily enough, a bathroom scale. Here’s a step by step guide of how to weigh a boat trailer at home with a bathroom scale:

Step 1. Level out the trailer

Being level is important when getting an accurate weight. Make sure that the wheels are chocked so the trailer cannot roll.

Step 2. Prepare the ground

  • Take a reliable board, like a 2x4, and place it directly below the trailer’s tongue. The board needs to be at least 3.5 feet long for this to work. 
  • Place the bathroom scale roughly 2 feet in either direction from the trailer tongue, and a block or brick about 1 foot from the trailer tongue the opposite end from the scale. You’ll want to protect the bathroom scale with a small piece of plywood or other material on the top.
  • Insert two horizontal pipes between the 2×4 and scale/brick: one in the center of the bathroom scale and one in the center of the brick.

Step 3. Weigh it on the Scale

Lower the trailer jack until the coupler is fully resting on a vertically-positioned pipe. Read the scale and multiply by 3. The average bathroom scale can’t do the entire weight, hence the multiplier. 

Weighing a Boat on a Trailer at Home

If you happen to find yourself needing to weigh the boat trailer with the boat still on it, the process of weighing a trailer on a bathroom scale can also provide the weight of the boat while keeping the boat on the trailer the entire time. 

Repeat the above process, but now record the weight. 

Next, slide the boat aft on the trailer 12" to 18". You must measure exactly how many inches you moved it, and record that. With the scale in the same location under the tongue, record the new scale reading. 

Finally, measure the distance in inches between the trailer axle (wheel centerline) and the point on the tongue where it touches the scale. You have then four measurements:

  • W1 = first (heavier) scale reading in lbs
  • W2 = second scale reading in lbs
  • X = the distance you shifted the boat in inches
  • C = distance between trailer axle and scale point in inches

The formula is: Boat Weight = C (W1-W2)/X

Now, there might be some error here, so if you don’t think you’re getting the right measurements, it might be prudent to take it to a weigh station. 

Eliminate the guesswork while hitching, loading, and launching your boat on the trailer and get a boat trailer backup camera instead!  At Camera Source, we have the tools and equipment to help you outfit your rig with whatever you need. Get in touch with us today!

Venture Trailers

Weight calculator, taking the guesswork out of finding the right trailer..

Calculating your boat’s weight capacity is a critical step for determining your trailer needs. That’s where we come in: our tool handles the numbers so you can handle the next adventure. Simply enter your boat’s criteria in the calculator below to find out your total capacity.

The dry weight is the weight of the boat less motors, fuel, batteries & water capacity.

* Fuel weight is auto-calculated using 6.2 lbs per gallon. Water weight is auto-calculated using 8.3 lbs per gallon. These are all estimates.

** Select a trailer with the next highest weight capacity rating and sufficient length capacity for your vessel.

Aluminum Trailers

Durable, affordable and lightweight. Count on our aluminum trailers to support your boat for years to come.

Bunk Trailers

If you’re looking for an affordable and easy-to-maintain trailer, bunk trailers may be for you.

Commander Line

Venture Trailers Commander Series is built for the long haul with premium features that every experienced boater could want. Each comes equipped with sleek, high-end features that come standard with every model.

Avoid corrosion on all your excursions with a galvanized trailer. Our complete galvanized trailer line comes in a range of sizes and configurations.

Personal Watercraft Trailer

Secure your PWC with a Venture Trailers Personal Watercraft Trailer. Our single or tandem trailers make transporting a breeze.

Pontoon Trailers

We have a wide variety of pontoon trailers that support your boat, from 16 feet to 26 feet in length.

Roller Trailers

Roller trailers are perfect for easy loading and unloading on shallow ramps or low tides.

Skiff and Jon Boat Trailers

Perfect for small boats, our Skiff and Jon Boat Trailers are made to carry lightweight loads for seamless loading and launching.

Tritoon Trailers

Get the support your boat needs with our strong and dependable tritoon trailers.

Boat Trailer Accessories

Give your trailer the upgrade it deserves. Find out more about Venture's full line of boat trailer accessories including aluminum wheels, dual well tongue jacks, electric brakes, stainless steel brakes, keel rollers, LED lights, bunk covers and more.

Weight Calculator

Don't stress about picking the perfect trailer for your boat.

Figuring out the weight your boat is very important when it comes to choosing the right trailer. Lucky for you, we've got a tool that does all the math for you. Just type in your boat's info in the calculator below and you'll know exactly what trailer you need for your next big adventure.

The dry weight is the weight of the boat less motors, fuel, batteries & water capacity.

* Fuel weight is auto-calculated using 6.2 lbs per gallon. Water weight is auto-calculated using 8.3 lbs per gallon. These are all estimates.

** Select a trailer with the next highest weight capacity rating and sufficient length capacity for your vessel.

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How Much Does a Boat Trailer Weigh? – Guide for Boat Lovers

Written by J. Harvey / Fact checked by S. Numbers

how much does a boat trailer weigh

There is no exact boat trailer weight, as different types of trailers have varying weights. Expect the range of the weight of boat trailers to be between 200 pounds to 4,400 pounds. This often depends on the kind of boat it accommodates and the type of the trailer itself.

I understand the dilemma behind this. What if you end up with more heft than your vehicle can handle? Fret not. I’ve explained boat and trailer weight mechanics further below.

Table of Contents

  • How Much Does a Boat Trailer Weigh And Why You Should Know Them

The Formula For Finding Out The Tongue Weight Of Boat Trailers

Trailer weight, boat size, and capacity always go together, other facts and factors related boat trailer weight, how much does a boat trailer weigh  and why you should know them.

boat-trailer-weight

When I mentioned the range above, I’m referring to the average dry or empty weight of boat trailers. For example, a trailer for kayaks or canoes weighs at least 200 pounds. The average tandem axle boat trailer weight and single axle boat trailer weight are usually 1,000 pounds and 600 pounds respectively.

On the other hand, an aluminum boat trailer’s weight, assuming it’s a tandem axle, ranges between 800 pounds to 1,000 pounds. Triple-axle trailers have empty weights that can balloon up to 1,600 pounds. We also need to consider trailers made specifically for huge vessels, which can weigh between 1,100 pounds to a whopping 4,400 pounds.

In most trailers, you can find the exact dry weight of the trailer on the manufacturer’s tag, which is usually glued to the frame. Take note that these weight figures connote the trailer’s frame alone.

It’s always better to know the exact weight of your trailer and your boat, rather than rely on averages. Knowing the precise empty weight of both means you’re one step closer to determining the total weight you’ll have to deal with, with your vehicle considered. It goes a long way in ensuring your safety while trailering, too.

It pays to know the tongue weight of your boat trailer since it should give you the peace of mind that your vehicle, whether it’s a standard car, truck, or SUV, can still handle all that weight. If you’re not already aware of it, the tongue weight of your boat trailer refers to the downward weight exerted by a completely loaded trailer on the vehicle’s hitch ball.

If you’re struggling to find the manufacturer’s tag on your trailer or it’s just no longer available, you can rely on a tongue weight formula shared on the AskingLot site. This way, you’ll at least always know the total weight you’ll need to manage to ensure road safety. It has also prepared a table that lists figures based on size, capacity, and trailer weight.

boat-trailer-weight-calculator

In fact, I’m assuming you’re asking this question because you already know the size and weight of your boat as well as its Gross Vehicle Weight Rating. If not, then you should try out the boat weight calculator shared by Venture Trailers. It’s almost always recommended to not go over 85% of the trailer’s GVWR to ensure safety while trailering.

GVWR limits vary per state. It’s different from Gross Trailer Weight because the latter represents the total objective weight, including the dry weight of the boat and trailer plus the gear and fuel.

I’ve yet to find a boat trailer weight calculator. But given that trailer weights are readily revealed by the manufacturer anyway, I don’t find the use of looking for one. That being said, Poontoonpedia has actually prepared one; although, it’s in the form of the chart.

Except for most canoe or kayak trailers, expect most trailers’ weights and capacities to be directly proportional or correlated. In canoe trailers, capacity and weight are almost always identical.

With regards to boat size, though, it’s a slightly different story. According to Go Down Size, heavier boats are often accommodated by extra axles and tougher materials being used on the trailers. This is why having a larger boat doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll immediately need a trailer with as much weight and capacity as possible.

  • A single axle trailer is almost always lighter than tandem or triple axles. Despite the dual axle boat trailer’s weight being higher, it’s actually easier to handle overall.
  • Trailers made of galvanized steel usually weigh more than their aluminum counterparts. Again, this doesn’t always mean that lightweight is better since more weight in trailering typically indicates higher stability.

When knowing your boat trailer’s weight, it’s important to beyond just finding out the total dry weight. There are other factors like boat size, capacity, and vehicle ratings that will always be intrinsically connected to a boat trailer’s weight, after all. As long as you familiarize yourself with the basic weight mechanics and how they are correlated, you shouldn’t have a hard time getting past weight dilemmas concerning your trailer and your boat.

sailboat trailer weight

“I am James Harvey – founder of Boating Basics Online. It is established with the drive to help out first-time boaters, which are those desiring to explore their way through the water. So if you are new to boating, start from here with me. “

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Boat Trailer Weights: How Much Do Boat Trailers Weigh?

boat trailer weights

A boat trailer is a major purchase. Intended to keep your boat safe during storage and transport, a boat trailer is essentially going to serve the purpose of your boat’s home on the road and its bed in your garage. But before you decide on a trailer, there are a few considerations to make.

The most important would have to be the right weight. Boat trailer weights vary widely depending on its size. But there’s a lot that rides on your trailer’s weight, so it’s really not a matter of preference. Here’s what you need to know to get the right trailer size and weight.

Average Boat Trailer Weights Based on Size

Before anything else, it’s worth mentioning that the weights listed below aren’t set in stone. Different manufacturers, models, and materials will affect the final weight of the trailer, so you’re still going to have to check the manual to find out how much the entire thing weighs.

But just to give you an idea of the weights you can expect, you can refer to this estimation chart of how much does a boat trailer weigh :

Remember that these are some very rough estimates. Weights can change drastically depending on what specific trailer you’re getting, and that also means that you should expect different capacities between models. Two different 22-foot trailers probably won’t offer the same payload.

The Most Popular Trailer Models and What They Can Tow

To give you a better idea of what you can expect, it might help to look at a few popular boat trailers to see what they can carry. These are five of the most prominent boat trailers on the market, all of which come in different sizes:

McClain 14’ to 17’ Single Axle Aluminum Jon Boat Trailer

Lightweight and simple, this jon boat trailer from McClain is made from aluminum giving it superior strength despite its low empty weight. The trailer clocks in at a measly 160lbs, but carries up to 640lbs of cargo.

Since it’s pretty small, it doesn’t need a set of brakes. But then again, the manufacturer does toss in a set of safety chains and DOT approved lights. And despite being pretty small, it comes pre-assembled unlike other small trailers that usually require assembly.

Stable with its single axle design, the McClain also comes with a winch stand and a 20’ strap to make it easier for you to load your boat on the bunks. The whole thing comes with a 1 year warranty to protect your purchase from defects.

Venture Galvanized Single Axle Pontoon Trailer

The Venture VP-18-20 accommodates boats between 16’ to 18’, and itself measures 23’3”. With a load capacity of 2,000 lbs, this pontoon trailer might require a set of brakes that you can purchase separately from the manufacturer or from any after-sales boat trailer brand.

Durable and stable, the design is made from galvanized steel which adds to its overall empty weight. Nonetheless, the material guarantees a long service life that should let you enjoy the trailer for close to a decade (or more) with proper care.

The specific design comes in several other sizes, accommodating boats up to 25’. Nevertheless, all of the sizes feature a single axle structure that’s fairly stable despite its significant weight capacity.

EZ-Loader Tandem Axle V-Hull

Designed for boats with a deep V-shaped hull, the EZ-Loader Tandem Axle V-Hull trailer features either a bunk or a roller assembly that makes it ideal for boat owners who might usually launch in shallow water. The design comes in sizes that accommodate boats between 17’ to 30’.

For boat owners who might want a little extra stability on the road, the EZ Loader features a tandem axle construction that makes it especially comfortable to tow even with significant weight loaded on the bunks.

And speaking of payload, this trailer from EZ-Loader touts a maximum weight capacity of up to 8,500lbs for their longest trailer. So to support that significant weight, the trailer touts a spring or torsion suspension that cushions the weight of your boat and trailer for better support on bumpy terrain.

Loadrite 5 STARR Galvanized Tandem Axle Bunk

This tandem roller features an ultra durable galvanized steel frame that makes it especially capable of sustaining significant weight. The longest option, measuring it at 30’, can carry boats up to 8,000 lbs. The all galvanized steel construction comes with its own suspension system to protect the payload from damage when traversing uneven roads.

Complete with a roller bed, the Loadrite 5 STARR trailer lets you easily launch your large boat into shallow water without the danger of damaging or scuffing the underside of your hull. Other than that, it comes with a set of LED lights, a tongue jack, and Bias-Ply tires.

Since it’s going to be a pretty big purchase, this trailer touts a 2+3 year warranty coverage from the manufacturer. It’s also automatically enrolled in the LoadStar Tire Roadside Assistance Program so you can get prompt support whenever you might need it.

ALS Triple Axle Aluminum Trailer

Since they’re made from aluminum, the ALS Triple Axle Aluminum Trailer is relatively lightweight compared to its tri-axle peers. Nonetheless, the largest option - measuring a whopping 42’ - can sustain boats up to 38’ in length and 17,000lbs in weight.

Nonetheless, it’s lightweight aluminum construction means that the trailer itself probably won’t weigh your vehicle down too much. That means you can tow the trailer and pontoon boat together without having to worry about overworking your SUV.

Complete with carpeted bunks, galvanized axles and wheels, a heavy duty winch and strap, and submsersible LED lights, this monster of a boat trailer gives you everything you need in one package.

How to Choose a Boat Trailer

Needless to say, choosing a boat trailer requires quite a bit of due diligence. There’s a lot to consider other than the weight of the boat itself. But with the right guidance, you should be able to zero in on the right pick.

Not quite sure what you should be looking for? Here are some of the most important considerations you should make when choosing a boat trailer:

Weight and Size Capacity

For obvious reasons. Always choose a boat trailer that’s designed to carry your boat’s length and weight. Ratings are always indicated by the manufacturer, so you shouldn’t have trouble finding one for your boat.

Trailer Weight

Towing too much weight could damage your vehicle. If you’re wondering how to weigh a boat trailer, you could always just check with the manufacturer. Or you could visit your local marina and ask to use their industrial scale.

As a general rule, galvanized steel will always be the strongest in terms of the ability to withstand mechanical damage. But if we’re talking corrosion, aluminum proves to have much better resistance.

Number of Axles

Single axle trailers are usually smaller and might not need a break system of its own. But then again, they can only carry a limited weight. Tandem and tri-axle boat trailers are significantly more capable, but they can be more difficult to tow.

Accessories

Quality submersible LED lights , a jack tongue, winch and straps, and other necessities for easy operation should be on your list of necessities. Without these accessories included in the bundle, you’re looking at several hundred extra dollars of after-sales expenses.

Assembled or Kits

While assembled trailers are definitely more convenient in that you can use them the moment they arrive at your doorstep, there’s the issue of shipping fees. Kits tend to cost less to deliver since they arrive in a smaller box.

Bunk or Roller

This depends mainly on where you like to launch your boat from. If your local launch ramp descends into a shallow water, a set of rollers might be better so you can just push your boat off into the deeper water without having to back your car up too far over the ramp.

The Bottom Line

Boat trailer weights and weight capacities are different from model to model, which means you should be able to find a trailer that’s the perfect fit for your boat. But aside from the weight and weight capacity, there are tons of other considerations you should factor into your decision. Perform your fair share of due diligence to make sure you’re getting the right trailer for the money and so you can avoid that expensive and tedious process of returns.

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Trailer Weights by Trailer Type

Trailer Weights by Trailer Type - Guide

How Much Does a Trailer Weigh?

Each type of trailer has a specific purpose, and because of this, the weight of each trailer is different. Trailers also vary greatly in their capacities, lengths and construction.

This trailer weight chart and guide provides the average weight of each type of trailer, as well as the weight range, the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) and the average load capacity.

Warning! The trailer weights listed below are intended to be a general guideline only. The actual weight and ratings of your specific trailer will vary.

Trailer Weight Chart

Tap each trailer type to read more

 
  200 100 to 400 200 to 800 200
  300 100 to 500 800 to 3,000 1,500
  500 300 to 800 1,300 to 3,500 1,900
  600 200 to 1,100 900 to 6,000 2,700
  600 400 to 800 3,000 to 5,000 3,400
  700 300 to 1,100 1,000 to 3,000 1,800
  1,000 400 to 1,800 2,000 to 7,000 2,200
  1,700 500 to 3,200 2,000 to 4,000 700
  1,700 1,200 to 2,300 2,500 to 3,600 1,200
  1,900 1,500 to 2,800 6,000 to 15,000 7,100
  2,200 1,100 to 4,400 5,400 to 34,400 11,400
  2,300 1,400 to 3,000 2,700 to 4,000 1,100
  2,700 900 to 5,200 3,000 to 10,000 4,400
  2,800 1,200 to 3,900 1,900 to 4,500 800
  2,900 2,300 to 3,900 7,000 to 8,000 4,300
  3,000 500 to 7,700 2,900 to 26,000 7,400
  4,500 1,100 to 10,100 3,000 to 30,000 12,400
  6,700 4,500 to 8,700 6,300 to 10,500 1,600
  7,200 4,700 to 10,400 15,900 to 36,000 16,000
  7,300 4,200 to 10,900 14,000 to 24,000 11,400
  7,600 3,600 to 11,400 14,700 to 22,500 10,300
  12,700 5,000 to 16,000 17,000 to 20,000 6,000
 *Each individual trailer must be weighed on its own. Never exceed the lowest-rated towing component, including the vehicle, hitch and trailer.

Brief explanation of terms

  • Empty Weight – The weight of the trailer without any cargo or fluids; also called Dry Weight or Unloaded Weight
  • GVWR – The maximum weight a trailer is rated to weigh, including cargo, fluids, etc.
  • Load Capacity – The total weight of the cargo a trailer is rated to carry

For further explanation of these terms, visit our Towing Capacity Guide .

Tow your trailer with the right hitch! Find a custom hitch made for your exact vehicle.

Truck Towing Boat Trailer

Camper Weight Chart

There are several different types of campers, from small teardrop trailers to deluxe 5th wheel RVs. This chart provides a focused look at average weights and capacities for most camper types.

 
  1,700 500 to 3,200 2,000 to 4,000 700
  1,700 1,200 to 2,300 2,500 to 3,600 1,200
  2,300 1,400 to 3,000 2,700 to 4,000 1,100
  2,800 1,200 to 3,900 1,900 to 4,500 800
  6,700 4,500 to 8,700 6,300 to 10,500 1,600
  7,600 3,600 to 11,400 14,700 to 22,500 10,300
  12,700 5,000 to 16,000 17,000 to 20,000 6,000
*Each individual trailer must be weighed on its own. Never exceed the lowest-rated towing component, including the vehicle, hitch and trailer.

Truck Towing 5th Wheel Trailer

Trailer Weights Explained

Canoe / Kayak Trailer

Canoe / Kayak Trailer Weight

Canoe and kayak trailers are small trailers used for hauling personal watercraft such as canoes, kayaks and even paddleboards.

They typically weigh between 100 and 400 pounds when unloaded. The average weight of a canoe or kayak trailer is 200 pounds.

Depending on the number of watercraft the trailer is designed to carry -- one, two, four or more – the maximum trailer weight can be anywhere from 200 to 800 pounds.

Truck Towing Kayak Trailer

Jet Ski Trailer Weight

Similar to a small boat trailer, jet ski trailers have an average empty weight of 300 pounds. Smaller jet ski trailers weigh as little as 100 pounds and larger ones are closer to 500 pounds.

When loaded, the weight of a jet ski trailer can fluctuate from 800 to 3,000 pounds with an average load capacity of 1,500 pounds.

Weight ratings will differ based on the number of jet skis the trailer is configured to haul.

Jeep Towing Jet Ski Trailer

Motorcycle Trailer Weight

A motorcycle trailer is designed for transporting a motorcycle, allowing it to be towed by another vehicle. This is different from a trailer towed by a motorcycle, also known as a motorcycle trailer.

Unloaded, a motorcycle trailer may weigh 300 to 800 pounds with an average weight of 500 pounds. They are commonly rated for a maximum trailer weight of 1,300 to 3,500 pounds, making their average load capacity just under 2,000 pounds.

Truck Towing Motorcycle Trailer

Fishing Boat Trailer Weight

A fishing boat trailer usually weighs 200 to 1,100 pounds on its own, without a boat loaded. The average for a boat trailer is about 600 pounds.

Combined boat and trailer weight ratings ranges from 900 to 6,000 pounds, depending on the length of the trailer and the boat itself.

The average weight capacity for a fishing boat trailer is about 2,700 pounds.

Truck Pulling Trailer with Fishing Boat

Tow Dolly Weight

A tow dolly for dinghy towing a vehicle usually weighs about 600 pounds without a vehicle hooked up. Some tow dollies weigh as a little as 400 pounds and others as much as 800 pounds, depending on the style and construction.

Tow dolly weight capacity ranges from 3,000 to 5,000 pounds. The capacity refers specifically to the total weight of the dinghy vehicle. However, the average capacity for most tow dollies is closer to 3,400 pounds.

Van with Tow Dolly Pulling Car

Small Open Utility Trailer Weight

Utility trailers typically weigh about 700 pounds unloaded, but they can vary greatly – from 300 to 1,100 pounds – depending on the construction, width, features, number of axles and more. The type of trailer referred to here is an open utility trailer less than 10 feet long.

The weight capacity of a small utility trailer can also range significantly. A short, aluminum utility trailer may only have a GVWR of 1,000 pounds, while a wide, double-axle, steel utility trailer may be rated for 3,000 pounds.

The average cargo load for small utility trailers is 1,800 pounds.

SUV Towing Small Landscape Utility Trailer

Small Enclosed Trailer Weight

Empty weight for small enclosed trailers spans from 400 to 1,800 pounds. The average for this type of trailer is 1,000 pounds, but this is determined largely by the materials used to construct the trailer and the number of axles.

When fully loaded, a small enclosed utility trailer can be rated for a maximum of up to 7,000 pounds (GVWR). However, for trailers 12 feet long or less, the average cargo load capacity is typically around 2,200 pounds.

Pickup Truck Towing Small Enclosed Trailer

Teardrop Trailer Weight

Teardrop camper trailers weigh between 500 and 3,200 pounds, but the average is about 1,700 pounds. It all depends on the features included. Some teardrop trailers have a fully integrated kitchen and awning system. Others are more basic.

Maximum teardrop camper weight can be as much as 4,000 pounds (GVWR). Some are only rated for 2,000 pounds.

Most teardrop campers aren’t designed to tow a lot of weight, and the average cargo capacity is only about 700 pounds.

Car Towing Teardrop Trailer

A-Frame Camper Weight

An A-frame camper is a specific type of pop up camper trailer. This type of camper usually weighs between 1,200 and 2,300 pounds unloaded. The average weight is 1,700 pounds.

A-frame campers provide a substantial amount of cargo capacity with an overall average of 1,200 pounds. Gross vehicle weight ratings for this type of trailer range from 2,500 up to 3,600 pounds.

SUV Hauling A-Frame Camper

Car Trailer Weight

A car trailer can weigh anywhere from 1,500 to 2,800 pounds by itself. The average is 1,900 pounds. With one or more cars loaded, that weight increases to as much as 15,000 pounds.

The weight of a car trailer largely depends on its construction, length and style. A bumper pull car hauler with length enough for one car may have a GVWR of 6,000 pounds, while a double-car gooseneck trailer could max out at 15,000 pounds. Additionally, aluminum car trailer weight and capacity will vary greatly from steel.

On average, the load capacity for car trailers is 7,100 pounds.

Pickup Truck Towing Car Trailer

Large Boat Trailer Weight

Larger boat trailers are used for hauling yachts, pontoon boats and other heavy watercraft. For this type of trailer, the empty weight ranges from 1,100 to 4,400 pounds, and the average is about 2,200 pounds.

When loaded with a large boat, the trailer weight increases greatly. The capacity depends on the build of the trailer and its configuration. GVWR can be as low as 5,400 pounds or as high as 34,400 pounds.

Average load capacity for large boat trailers is around 11,400 pounds.

Dually Truck Launching Large Boat

Pop Up Camper Weight

The average weight of a pop up camper is about 2,300 pounds unloaded. Some are as little as 1,400, and others weigh as much as 3,000 pounds if they are equipped with certain features.

When fully loaded (GVWR), pop up trailer weight can range from 2,700 up to 4,000 pounds, giving this type of camper an average load capacity of 1,100 pounds. This provides plenty of room for a propane tank, water tank, grille, bedding, luggage and other necessary cargo for a successful campout.

SUV Towing Pop Up Camper

Large Enclosed Trailer Weight

Large enclosed trailers, namely those 12 feet or longer with a bumper pull coupler, typically weigh about 2,700 pounds when empty. Some are little as 900 pounds. Heavy-duty models weigh up to 5,200 pounds.

The capacity of a large enclosed utility trailer can vary based on how many axles it has, the construction of the frame and other factors.

In general, the average cargo capacity is 4,400 pounds. However, some 12-foot enclosed trailers only have a gross vehicle weight rating of 3,000 pounds. Longer units are rated as high as 10,000 pounds.

Ford Truck Towing Large Enclosed Trailer

Small Travel Trailer Weight

A smaller travel trailer – about 22 feet long or less – has an average weight of about 2,800 pounds. The unloaded weight range is typically between 1,200 and 3,900 pounds.

The gross vehicle weight rating of small travel trailers varies from 1,900 pounds up to 4,500 pounds.

Generally, small travel trailers don’t have a lot of extra cargo capacity. The average is only about 800 pounds. However, some are rated to carry as much as 1,400 pounds. The cargo capacity may increase with certain design features and additional axles.

SUV Camping with Small Travel Trailer

Small Horse Trailer Weight

A horse trailer designed to transport one or two horses typically weighs between 2,300 and 3,900 pounds. With horses and cargo loaded, this number increases. The average empty weight of a horse trailer is about 2,900 pounds.

When loaded up, small horse trailers max out at 7,000 or 8,000 pounds (GVWR). This allows for a cargo capacity of about 4,300 pounds.

Load capacities vary by trailer style and construction. A simple, one-horse trailer made from aluminum will weigh far less than a deluxe, two-horse trailer with a steel frame.

Truck Towing Small Horse Trailer

Large Flatbed Trailer Weight

Large flatbed trailers, such as car haulers, equipment trailers and utility flatbeds, can weigh anywhere from 500 to 7,700 pounds, even when empty.

However, because they are designed for transporting large amounts of cargo, most large flatbed trailers – that is, bumper pull flatbed trailers – have a higher cargo capacity. The average is about 7,400 pounds.

For gross trailer weight ratings on flatbed trailers, the low end is around 2,900, but some are rated as high as 26,000 pounds, even with a bumper pull configuration. Gooseneck models are rated even higher.

Work Truck Towing Large Flatbed Trailer

Dump Trailer Weight

When empty, a dump trailer can weigh anywhere from 1,100 to just over 10,000 pounds. The average weight for dump trailers is 4,500 pounds unloaded.

This type of trailer is extremely useful for transporting large amounts of fine or loose materials – everything from gravel to demolition waste. The hydraulic or powered dump receptacle makes unloading fast and easy.

The smallest dump trailers have a gross vehicle weight rating of 3,000 pounds. The largest models can weigh as much as 30,000 pounds. The average GVWR for dump trailers is around 12,400 pounds.

Unloading Dump Trailer Full of Dirt

Large Travel Trailer Weight

A large travel trailer – anything around 20 feet or longer – has an average weight of about 6,700 pounds. Specifically, this refers to the travel trailer dry weight. This weight is largely dependent on the types of features and how many axles the trailer has.

Some larger travel trailers only weigh about 4,500 pounds, but the largest are around 9,000 pounds. 5th wheel camper trailers weigh even more.

When fully loaded with cargo, supplies and fluids, the gross vehicle weight rating of a travel trailer can vary from 6,300 to 10,500 pounds. The average cargo capacity of a bumper pull travel trailer is 1,600 pounds.

Pickup Truck Towing Large Travel Trailer

Gooseneck Flatbed Trailer Weight

Gooseneck flatbed trailers and utility trailers generally have higher weight ratings than their bumper pull cousins. A typical gooseneck flatbed trailer weighs about 7,000 pounds without cargo.

Smaller gooseneck flatbeds can weigh as little as 4,700 pounds, but the largest are upwards of 10,000 pounds.

For gross vehicle weight ratings, gooseneck flatbed trailers are built for heavy-duty hauling, whether it’s construction materials, farm equipment or automotive toys. Some are only rated for a maximum weight just under 16,000 pounds. Heavier-duty options are rated up to 36,000 pounds.

The average load capacity for gooseneck flatbed trailers is 16,000 pounds.

Gooseneck Flatbed Trailer with Skidsteer

Large Livestock Trailer Weight

Larger livestock trailers range in weight from 4,200 to nearly 11,000 pounds when unloaded. With animals and cargo on board, that range increases up to 24,000 pounds (GVWR).

Livestock trailers are fairly diverse in their design and size. For example, a 20-foot aluminum bumper pull livestock trailer will be much lighter than a 40-foot steel gooseneck horse trailer. Some livestock trailers are also equipped with wash stalls, a living space and other features, adding to the overall weight.

The average empty weight for large livestock trailers is about 7,300 pounds. For load capacity, the average is around 11,400 pounds.

Farm Truck Towing Large Livestock Trailer

Toy Hauler Weight

A toy hauler is a bumper pull, 5th wheel or gooseneck trailer with a living space and a large compartment for transporting ATVs, UTVs, dirt bikes and other recreational motorsport vehicles.

Toy haulers, when unloaded, range in weight from 3,600 to 11,400 pounds, with an average of about 7,600 pounds.

Because they’re built for transporting smaller vehicles, toy haulers generally have a higher cargo capacity. The average is about 10,000 pounds.

Gross vehicle weight ratings for toy hauler trailer can vary from just under 15,000 to over 22,000 pounds.

GMC Truck Pulling Toy Hauler

5th Wheel Camper Weight

5th wheel campers have an average weight of 12,700 pounds, empty and unloaded. Smaller models weigh as little as 5,000 pounds, while the largest 5th wheel camper trailers weigh up to 16,000 pounds.

To allow plenty of space for camping gear, equipment, cargo and fluids, the average load capacity is 6,000 pounds.

When fully loaded and ready for towing, most 5th wheel campers have a gross vehicle weight rating between 17,000 and 20,000 pounds.

Truck Towing 5th Wheel Camper

1.  How much does a camper weigh?

A camper can weigh anywhere from 500 to 20,000 pounds. It all depends on the style of the camper. For example, a teardrop camper usually weighs about 1,500 pounds unloaded, while a 36-foot 5th wheel camper can weigh as much as 15,000 pounds, even when empty.

2. How much does a teardrop trailer weigh?

A teardrop trailer is one of the smallest camper types and one of the lightest. They typically weigh between 500 and 3,000 pounds, but the average is closer to 1,500. Some teardrop camper trailers have a gross vehicle weight rating as high as 4,000 pounds.

3. How much do pop up campers weigh?

Pop up campers weigh between 1,400 and 4,000 pounds. When empty and unloaded the average weight for pop up campers is about 2,300 pounds. However, they can also carry an average cargo load of 1,100 pounds. For maximum vehicle weight, a pop up camper can range from 2,700 to 4,000 pounds (GVWR).

4. How much does a small camper weigh?

A small camper can weigh anywhere from 500 pounds to 4,500 pounds, depending on the style. Teardrop campers, pop up campers and shorter travel trailers can all be classified as small campers. The average weight of a teardrop camper is about 2,000 pounds with cargo, and the average for small travel trailers is about 3,000 pounds.

5. How much does a travel trailer weigh?

Travel trailers vary in weight from 1,200 to almost 9,000 pounds. They come in various lengths, styles and builds, allowing for a diverse weight range. Smaller travel trailers have an average maximum weight of about 3,500 pounds (GVWR). Some larger travel trailers can max out at over 10,000 pounds when fully loaded up.

6. How much does a 5th wheel weigh?

5th wheel trailers are one of the heaviest types of trailer, with an average empty weight of about 13,000 pounds. The average gross vehicle weight rating for 5th wheel trailers is around 18,000 pounds, but some are as much as 20,000. Additionally, gooseneck trailers with a 5th wheel conversion can be even heavier.

7. How much does a boat trailer weigh?

Boat trailers by themselves can weigh as little as 100 pounds or as much as 4,400 pounds. The weight is determined by the length of the trailer and the type of boat or boats it is designed to carry. For example, jet ski trailers are about 300 pounds on average. Standard fishing boat trailers usually don’t weigh more than 1,000 pounds. Large yacht trailers, even without a boat loaded on, can easily be over 4,000 pounds.

8. How much does a boat and trailer weigh?

A boat and trailer together can weigh anywhere between 900 and 35,000 pounds. For small fishing boats and jon boats, the total weight for the boat and trailer ranges from 900 to 6,000 pounds. On the other hand, a heavy-duty yacht trailer and its craft together can easily weigh beyond 30,000 pounds.

9. How much does a horse trailer weigh?

Horse trailers vary in length, construction and features. A basic, aluminum single-horse trailer usually weighs less than 3,000 pounds. On the other hand, 12-horse trailers or horse trailers with a living space, elaborate wash stalls and other equipment can weigh upwards of 20,000 pounds.

10. How much does a 2-horse trailer weigh?

2-horse trailers weigh between 2,000 and 8,000 pounds. Some are more simple and constructed from lightweight materials. Others are more elaborate and longer, even though the horse capacity remains at 2 maximum. The average load capacity for a 2-horse trailer is about 4,000 pounds.

11. How much does an enclosed trailer weigh?

The weight of an enclosed trailer can fluctuate from 400 pounds to more than 20,000 pounds, depending on the style of the trailer and whether it is loaded with cargo or not. For example, a small, basic, enclosed utility trailer, empty of all cargo, may only weigh 500 pounds. Conversely, a toy hauler loaded up with a few ATVs might weigh in at 22,000 pounds.

12. How much does a car trailer weigh?

An unloaded car trailer usually weighs between 1,500 and 3,000 pounds. Gooseneck-style car trailers can weigh over 10,000 pounds. The construction, length and number cars the trailer is built to transport can make a huge difference. When loaded, the weight of some car trailers can increase to as much as 36,000 pounds.

Warning! The trailer weights listed on this page are intended to be a general guideline only. The actual weight and ratings of your specific trailer will vary.

Boater Pal

How Much Do Boats Weigh? (Ultimate Data Chart)

The weight of a boat can vary a lot mostly depending on the length of the boat and the materials used for the boat. There are also many other factors such as size/amount of engines, size of the fuel tank, amount of gear on board, size of the cabin, and much more.

However, if we generalize based on length: small boats that are 17-22 feet weigh around 1,600-3,200 pounds. Boats 23-27 feet weigh around 3,600-4,800 pounds. Medium-sized boats 28-35 feet weigh around 5,800-13,500 pounds. And large boats 36-45 feet weigh around 15,500-29,000 pounds.

Boat TypeBoat Weight (lbs)Trailer Weight (lbs)
Fiberglass Bass Boats1,800-2,900500-1,200
Aluminum Bass Boats1,100-2,650500-1,200
Bowriders2,000-10,350800-2,300
Pontoon Boats1,500-3,350950-1,900
Sit-down Jet Skis650-1,000200-300
Stand-up Jet Skis300-550200-300
Ski boats3,195-3,5501,100
Wake boats4,300-7,3501,100-1,900
Deep V Fishing Boats1,350-2,800500-1,100
Small Center Consoles (16′-25′)1,570-6,300500-1,650
Large Center Consoles (26′-40′)7,100-21,7001,700-2,000+
Small Sailboats (15′-25′)400-5,000500-1,800
Large Sailboats (26′-40′)6,000-30,0001,700-2,000+
Cuddy Cabins2,000-5,300800-1,800
Small Cabin Cruisers (30′-40′)11,100-25,200NA
Large Cabin Cruisers (41′-50′)27,000-46,800NA
Small Yachts (55′-70′)87,000-150,000NA
Large Yachts (75′-90′)157,500-235,500NA

These calculations were found by taking many examples of boats within each boat category. However, If you want a more precise answer that considers lengths and material, continue reading to the “ Boat and trailer weight based on the type and length of a boat ” sub-heading.

It’s important to note that boats made from aluminum tend to be around 300-1,500 pounds lighter than similarly sized fiberglass boats.

Table of Contents

Knowing boat weight terms

Before getting specific with all the different boat types, knowing these terms will help you understand the data better.

If you’ve ever tried finding the weight of a boat, you’ll notice that manufacturers use a lot of different wordings. These may include dry weight, wet weight, curb weight, package weight, gross trailer weight, actual boat weight, and more.

Understanding the difference between these is important, especially if you plan on reading the rest of the article. So let’s get into it:

Dry weight is the most common weight statistic you will find on a manufacturer’s website that states the weight of their boats. It means the weight of a boat without any engines, fuel, water, or accessories. In other words, the weight of a boat straight from the factory.

Some manufacturers may include engines in dry weight, but if they do so, they will usually tell you.

Unfortunately, this number isn’t the number boat owners need; however, it’s usually the only number provided. I usually assume that the wet weight of a boat is around 300-1,500+ pounds more, mostly depending on the amount/size of the engines and the size of the fuel tank.

Wet weight/curb weight

Wet weight, also known as curb weight, is the weight of a boat including engines, accessories, fuel, oil, and any other liquids. It does not include the weight of passengers or cargo.

This is one of the most important terms you’ll need to know for your boat as it will help you find your needed vehicle towing capacity, boat lift weight capacity, and other miscellanies things.

Package weight/gross trailer weight

Package weight, also known as gross trailer weight (GTW), is the wet weight of your boat plus the weight of your trailer. This is the weight you need to know for towing.

Most trailers weigh around 600 pounds for small 17′ boats to 1,900 pounds for larger 26′ boats. Most boats over 30′ are not trailerable unless you opt for an oversized load.

Actual boat weight

Actual boat weight means the wet weight of your boat plus any equipment, people, or cargo on board your boat. If a lot of people are on board or if you have a lot of heavy fishing equipment, it will significantly raise the weight of your boat.

Factors that go into how much a boat weighs

Besides the size of a boat, there are some other factors that go into how much it will weigh including:

  • Material used
  • Size of engine(s)
  • Amount of equipment
  • Amount of batteries
  • Size of the fuel tank
  • Amount of fuel in the fuel tank
  • Amount of water within the boat
  • Amount of gear you have on-board

Most of these are accounted for in the averages I’ve provided, but if you are trying to estimate the weight of your boat and you know you have an abnormally heavy or high quantity of these things, make sure to account for it.

Boat and trailer weight based on the type and length of a boat

There are many different boat types, all of which have different weights. Below I’ve listed the weights, trailer weights, and gross trailer weights (wet weight of boat plus trailer weight) of many different boat types. Click on the boat type below to be directed to which one you want to see.

There are two popular materials used to build bass boats, fiberglass and aluminum. Fiberglass is much heavier than aluminum, so I decided to split up the two in order to give more precise averages. So:

On average, fiberglass bass boats weigh around 1,400-2,200 pounds. Aluminum bass boats weigh around 700-2,000 pounds. Their gear, fuel, and engines generally add another 400-700 pounds and their trailers generally weigh around 500-1,200 pounds.

Average fiberglass bass boat weight by length

Length (ft)Dry Weight (lbs)Engine, Gear, & Fuel Weight (lbs)Trailer Weight (lbs)GTW (lbs)
161,4004005002,300
171,5004506002,550
181,6505008002,950
191,9006009003,400
202,0007001,1003,800
212,2007001,2004,100

Average aluminum bass boat weight by length

Length (ft)Dry Weight (lbs)Engine, Gear, & Fuel Weight (lbs)Trailer Weight (lbs)GTW (lbs)
167004005001,600
178504506001,900
181,2005008002,500
191,5005509002,950
201,8006001,1003,500
212,0006501,2003,850

Related Article: How Much Do Bass Boats Weigh? (17+ Examples)

On average, Bowrider boats weigh around 1,500-8,750 pounds mostly depending on their length. Their gear and fuel generally add another 500-1,600 pounds and their trailers generally weigh around 800-2,300 pounds.

Length (ft)Dry Weight (lbs)Engine, Gear, & Fuel Weight (lbs)Trailer Weight (lbs)GTW (lbs)
161,5005008002,800
171,6505508503,050
181,9006009003,400
192,2506501,0003,900
202,9007001,1004,700
213,1007001,2005,000
223,4007001,4005,500
233,6007501,5005,850
243,8007501,6006,100
254,1008001,6506,350
264,4008001,7006,700
274,8008001,8007,100
285,8009001,8508,550
297,8001,1002,00010,900
308,2001,3002,10011,600
318,7501,6002,30012,650

On average, pontoon boats weigh between 1,600-2,400 pounds (726-1,089 kg), including the motor. However, some weigh up to 5,000 pounds (2268 kg). Pontoon boat trailers weigh between 1,000-1,700 (454-771 kg) pounds on average. Other weight factors to consider include gas, passengers, and gear.

Length (ft)Dry Weight (lbs)Engine, Gear, & Fuel Weight (lbs)Trailer Weight (lbs)GTW (lbs)
161,1503509502,450
171,2504001,0002,650
181,3504501,0502,850
191,5505001,1503,200
201,6505501,2503,450
211,8006001,4003,800
221,9506501,6004,200
232,1006501,6504,400
242,2256501,7254,600
252,3507001,7504,800
262,4507001,8505,000
272,6507001,9005,250

Related Article: Pontoon Boat Weight: Can You Tow Them? (75+ Examples)

Sit-down jet skis weigh around 650-1,000 pounds, and stand-up jet skis weigh around 300-550 pounds. This includes the jet ski’s weight plus the weight for fuel and gear. Jet ski trailers weigh around 200-300 pounds, and double trailers weigh around 350-500 pounds.

Check out the weights of every new jet ski on the market in this article: How Much Do Jet Skis Weigh? (Plus Trailer Weight)

On average, ski boats weigh around 3,100 pounds. Their gear and fuel generally add another 250-600 pounds and their trailers generally weigh around 1,100-1,900 pounds.

There aren’t many true ski boats on the market anymore as they are being taken over by wake boats, however here are the weights of the top 3 on the market.

BoatLengthBoat & Engine Weight (lbs)Gear & Fuel Weight (lbs)Trailer Weight (lbs)GTW (lbs)
MasterCraft ProStar20′3,3002501,1004,650
Ski Nautique20′2,9452501,1004,295
Malibu Response TXi20′ 6″3,1002501,1004,450

Related article: How Much Do Ski Boats Weigh? (17+ Examples)

On average, wake ski boats weigh around 4,000-6,700 pounds. Their gear and fuel generally add another 250-600 pounds, and their trailers weigh around 1100-1,900 pounds.

Length (ft)Boat & Engine Weight (lbs)Gear & Fuel Weight (lbs)Trailer Weight (lbs)GTW (lbs)
204,0003001,1005,400
214,7003501,2006,250
225,3004001,3007,000
235,5005001,4507,450
245,8006001,6008,000
256,5006001,8008,900
266,7006501,9009,250

On average, aluminum deep V fishing boats weigh around 1,000 to 2,100 pounds. Their engines, gear, and fuel generally add another 350-700 pounds, and their trailers weigh around 500-1,100 pounds. Fiberglass equivalents generally weigh 400 more pounds.

Length (ft)Dry Weight (lbs)Engine, Gear, & Fuel Weight (lbs)Trailer Weight (lbs)GTW (lbs)
161,0003505001,850
171,3504006002,350
181,6004508002,850
191,8005009003,200
202,1007001,1003,900

In general, center console boats weigh between 1,100 and 8,500 pounds depending mostly on their size. Their engine, gear, and fuel add another 470 to 2,000 pounds, and their trailers weigh around 500 to 2,000 pounds.

Length (ft)Dry Weight (lbs)Engine, Gear, & Fuel Weight (lbs)Trailer Weight (lbs)GTW (lbs)
161,1004705002,070
171,5005506002,650
181,9007008003,400
192,1008009003,800
202,5009001,1004,500
212,8001,0001,2005,000
223,1001,2001,4005,700
233,8001,6001,5006,900
244,0001,7001,6007,300
254,4001,9001,6507,950
265,0002,1001,7008,800
275,9002,4001,80010,100
286,1002,6001,90010,600
296,4002,8001,95011,150
307,2003,0002,00012,200
328,8003,400NANA
3410,0004,000NANA
3613,4004,900NANA
3814,3005,200NANA
4015,5006,200NANA

Related Article: How Much Do Center Console Boats Weigh? (10+ Examples)

There are many different lengths and types of sailboats including both single-hull sailboats and catamarans. So their weight of them changes drastically depending on the exact make and model. However, According to Lifeofsailing.com , here are the general statistics:

Sailboat sizeTotal Weight
Small Sailboats (15’ to 20’)400 to 2,500 pounds
Medium Sailboats (21’ to 25’)2,500 to 5,000 pounds
Cruising Sailboats (26’ to 32′)6,000 to 12,000 pounds
Large Sailboats (35’ to 40’)12,000 to 30,000 pounds

On average, cuddy cabin boats weigh around 1,500-4,500 pounds mostly depending on their length. Their gear and fuel generally add another 500-800 pounds and their trailers generally weigh around 800-1,800 pounds.

Length (ft)Dry Weight (lbs)Engine, Gear, & Fuel Weight (lbs)Trailer Weight (lbs)GTW (lbs)
161,5005008002,800
171,6505508503,050
181,9006009003,400
192,2506501,0003,900
202,9007001,1004,700
213,1007001,2005,000
223,4007001,4005,500
233,6007501,5005,850
243,7507501,6006,100
253,9008001,6506,350
264,2008001,7006,700
274,5008001,8007,100

Small cabin cruiser boats (30-40 feet long) weigh around 10,000-22,000 pounds. Larger ones (41-50 feet long weigh around 24,000-42,000 pounds. Their gear and fuel generally add another 1,100-4,800 pounds .

Length (ft)Boat Weight Without Fuel (lbs)Gear & Fuel Weight (lbs)
3010,0001,100
3111,0001,200
3212,0001,200
3313,0001,300
3413,5001,300
3514,0001,400
3616,0001,600
3718,0001,900
3819,0002,300
3921,0002,500
4022,5002,700
4124,0003,000
4225,0003,300
4326,0003,800
4427,0004,000
4529,0004,100
5042,0004,800

There isn’t an exact standard that defines yachts; however, in this article, I am considering them to be any recreational vessel over 50 feet long. It’s hard to find averages of boats this big as they vary a lot depending on the make/model. However, my data below is an average of three different models within each length, so it should at least give you an idea of how much a boat around that length should weigh.

On average, yachts that are 55-65 feet long weigh around 75,000-100,000 pounds, yachts 66-75 feet long weigh around 105,000-128,000 pounds, and yachts 76-90 feet long weigh around 137,000-205,000 pounds. Their gear and fuel add another 12,000-30,500 pounds.

Length (ft)Boat Weight Without Fuel (lbs)Gear & Fuel Weight (lbs)
5575,00012,000
6091,00013,000
65100,00017,000
70128,00022,000
75134,00023,500
80145,00025,000
90205,00030,500

How to weigh a boat?

The most accurate way to weigh a boat is to take it to a truck scale. Make sure it has all the gear and equipment in it that you need to have and weigh it. Also, note the amount of fuel that is in the boat as well. Gas weighs about 6 pounds per gallon, and boat fuel tanks can hold anywhere from 15 to thousands of gallons. You can then subtract out the weight of the trailer (which can be found by either weighing the trailer separately or just estimating using my averages).

Here’s what a truck scale looks like:

sailboat trailer weight

You can find these by just searching truck scale near me. Then try to contact them in advance or just show up at a location and they will most likely be happy to assist you if it’s within working hours.

If you’re unable to do that, most manufacturers will have the weights listed on their website; however, you may still have to do some estimating for engine, gear, & fuel weight as well as trailer weight. The data I provided above should also help you out with that.

What are the best vehicles for towing boats?

Making sure you are using a capable towing vehicle is crucial for the safety of you and others on the road when you are towing a boat. You can see a vehicle’s towing capacity by searching the make and model of the vehicle and then typing “towing capacity” after in the search bar.

It’s generally recommended to have a vehicle that is capable of towing 1,000 more pounds than the total weight of what you are towing. So in this case, the GTW would be the total weight.

Depending on how much your boat weighs, there will be different vehicles that would fit you best. However, below are a few popular vehicles used for towing boats:

Here are some popular SUVs used for towing boats

  • Can tow up to 5,000 pounds.
  • 2- or 4-wheel options.
  • Can tow up to 7,800 pounds (V8), or 6,200 pounds (V6).
  • All-wheel drive.
  • Can tow up to 7,400 pounds.
  • Turbodiesel option available.
  • Can tow up to 8,000+ pounds depending on the model.
  • Can tow up to 9,300 pounds.
  • Can tow up to 8,300 pounds.

And here are some popular trucks

  • Can tow up to 6,700 pounds.
  • Can tow up to 7,000 pounds with the gas engine, and the diesel model adds around 700 more pounds of towing capacity.
  • Can tow anywhere from 8,000 to 9,000 pounds.
  • Can tow anywhere from 9,700 to 10,900 pounds.
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Survival Tech Shop

Average Sailboat Weight (With 7 Examples)

By: Author Brennan Valeski

Posted on Last updated: November 9, 2019

Categories Boating , Sailboat

Average Sailboat Weight (With 7 Examples)

You can expect an average sailboat weight to be about 8,000 pounds (3,629 kg) . Most sailboat trailers weigh about 1,200 pounds (544 kg).

The average sailboat weight varies depending on the length from 2,000 pounds (907 kg) on average for 14 to 24 feet in length and up to 30,000 pounds (13,608 kg) for larger yacht style sailboats from 40 to 50 feet in length.

Sailboat weight and size ranges quite a bit with both very small and very large. It's difficult to get an accurate estimation on the average weight without doing research yourself based on what type of sailboat size you're looking for.

When looking for sailboats, the weight is listed as displacement. Displacement refers to the boat in the water, before it's loaded with gear and fuel. Package weight (if shown) includes the weight of the trailer, motor, batteries, and weight on the water.

7 Example Sailboat Weights

The following chart features example sailboat weights of specific models ranging from the lightest to heaviest used on the water. Additional details can be found on the manufacturer's websites. Here's the sailboat weight chart:

Additional Weight and Trailer Options

In terms of transporting your sailboat, many people use a sailboat transport service . These services will hitch and transport your sailboat for you if you don't have the proper vehicle for towing.

However, if your sailboat is under 10,000 pounds (4,536 kg), then you may be able to easily tow your boat with the right equipment.

Make sure to check your vehicle's  towing capacity . This can be found in your owner's manual or the manufacturer's website as your gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR).

If your sailboat has a backup engine it's also important to account for fuel. The weight of fuel is about  6.3 (2.9 kg) pounds per gallon of gas.  Fuel tanks on sailboats average at about 5 to 10 gallons. When considering the weight of fuel, you can expect on average a full tank of gas to add  47 pounds (21 kg).

To Conclude

Sailboats provide a fun mode of transportation on many different areas of water. Each type also comes with it's own weights based on it's size and use.

It's important to know the correct weight when looking to tow and transport your sailboat. If you're unsure and want specific weights, you can always check the manufacture's website or go to a local cat scale to get a more accurate weight.

life-of-sailing-logo

How Much Does A Sailboat Weigh?

how-much-does-a-sailboat-weigh

Last Updated by

Daniel Wade

June 15, 2022

While it may seem counterintuitive, there's more than one weight measurement for sailboats. In this article, we'll go over three ways of determining the weight of a sailboat.

Consumer sailboats usually weigh between 120 and 30,000 pounds, with the average sailboat weighing 8,845 pounds. This average sailboat weight is without taking into account additional gear, fuel, people, and more that are on a sailboat out on the water. To accurately weigh a boat isn't as simple as dropping it on a scale.  Besides the logistical problems you'd face, it wouldn't give you all the information you need to know.

That's why there are a few types of weight measurement for boats.  These are dry weight, displacement, and tonnage. Don't confuse these subtypes; while displacement and dry weight are closely related, tonnage is a different type of measurement.

Table of contents

Dry weight is closely related to displacement, and it’s the number you’d get if you hung an empty boat from a scale.  Dry weight isn’t always included on specification sheets, but it’s vital if you intend to tow or transport your boat.  

To give you a better idea of the dry weight of different vessels, we’ll use a short list of common boat sizes by LOA (length overall) in feet.  Keep in mind, the weight of a boat differs based on hull material , mast type, and many other factors.

  • Dinghies (less than 12’): 100 to 200 pounds
  • Small Sailboats (15’ to 20’): 400 to 2,500 pounds
  • Medium Sailboats (21’ to 25’): 2,500 to 5,000 pounds
  • Cruising Sailboats (27’ to 32’): 7,000 to 12,000 pounds
  • Large Sailboats (35’ to 40’): 12,000 to 30,000 pounds

What factors contribute to the weight of a sailboat?  Hull material makes a huge difference in dry weight.  Older wooden cruising vessels with deep keels often weigh thousands of pounds more than an equivalent-sized fiberglass boat.  Also, sport and racing sailboats sometimes weigh a fraction of an average consumer cruiser.  

A sailboat’s mast and rigging contribute to the weight as well.  Solid hardwood masts sometimes weigh hundreds of pounds more than hollow masts, and heavy brass deck equipment adds up.  It doesn’t take long for equipment to increase the weight of a boat.

Displacement

How is displacement different than dry weight?  First of all, you can only calculate dry weight when a boat is empty and dry.  Displacement is equal to the weight of a boat, along with everything (and everyone) aboard at the time of measurement.  This includes water, fuel, deck equipment, interior cushions—you get the picture.

The most common measurement of weight for sailboats is displacement, and it reflects the weight of a loaded sailboat in the water.  We measure displacement by calculating the weight of the water volume a boat displaces.  This unit is vital in boat design.  A vessel will sink if it weighs more than the water it displaces.  

There’s a simple way of picturing the concept of displacement.  Imagine a cup of water filled to the very top.  Now drop in a coin and measure the amount of water that spills out.  The weight of the spilled liquid is the displacement of the coin.   

Oddly, the displacement value of a boat means slightly different things in salt and freshwater.  Saltwater weighs 64.1 pounds per cubic foot, while fresh water weighs 62.4 pounds per cubic foot.  That means a boat will displace more freshwater because saltwater essentially ‘pushes harder’ upward on the craft.

So, how does displacement translate to weight?  You can get a general idea of how ‘heavy’ a boat is using a simple calculation, shown below.

‍ (Displacement/2,240) / (LWL x 0.02)^3

1)    First, you’ll need to convert the displacement (in pounds) to long tons .  Simply divide the displacement by 2,240 to get your answer.  Put this number aside for a moment.

2)    Next, find the length at waterline ( LWL ) of your boat, and multiply it by 0.01 .  Take this value and raise it to the power of 3 .  It should look something like this: (LWL x 0.01) ^3

3)    Finally, divide your first number (in long tons) by the result of the previous calculation to get your displacement to length ratio .

The displacement to length ratio is useful for a number of reasons.  Using this simple number allows you to determine the weight class of a boat, so you’ll know what it’s suitable for.  Below, we put together a list to help you understand the differences using a D/L ratio of 40 to 400.

  • Ultra-light (race boats): 40 to 89
  • Light (race or trailer-sailboat): 90-179
  • Medium (day boat/light cruiser): 180-269
  • Heavy ( cruising sailboat /offshore cruiser): 270-359
  • Very Heavy (heavy offshore cruiser): 360-400+

Generally speaking, sailboats built before 1950 typically have a heavy D/L ratio.  A boat with a ratio over 300 handles much differently than a light vessel, and many consider heavier boats to be more ‘seaworthy.’  Of course, it’s not always that simple, but the general rule still applies.  Using what we know about displacement, it’s time to go over our final weight measurement.

Tonnage represents the volume of the enclosed space on a boat, using the same concept as displacement.  Salt and freshwater tonnage differ for the same reasons as well.  Tonnage and size are directly related, and this unit gives you an idea of how much cargo you can carry before overloading.  Cargo tonnage is measured in long tons, similar to displacement.  Simply divide the tonnage (in pounds) by 2,240 to get your cargo tonnage value.

Why Weight Matters

While we haven’t mentioned every way of weighing a sailboat, you can gain a lot from understanding dry weight, displacement, and tonnage.  For example, you’ll need to know the dry weight of a boat to determine if your vehicle can actually tow it.  If a vessel weighs 15,000 pounds, you’ll probably want to avoid it unless you have a permanent mooring or a heavy-duty pickup truck.  

Displacement and dry weight are closely related.  Displacement is equally crucial for determining a boat’s capabilities.  Heavy, deep-keel sailboats generally handle well in rough seas, but you probably won’t be racing with a high D/L ratio.  If you understand what your intentions for a boat, it’s imperative to comprehend displacement and D/L ratio.  

Tonnage is essential to understand, especially for offshore cruising.  Using this value, you can calculate how much food, water, supplies, and how many people you can take aboard.  Ignoring any of these values can spell disaster for any captain but understanding sailboat weight ahead of time ensures you’ll know what you’re doing.

Now that you have a grasp of sailboat weight measurements, it’s time for some real-world examples.  We found the specifications of three common sailboats so you can get an idea of what to expect.

How Much Does A Catalina 30 Weigh?

This 30-foot sloop is one of the most successful production fiberglass sailboats in history.  It was built by Catalina Yachts between 1972 and 2008, with over 6,000 units.  We chose the Catalina 30 because it’s an ideal example of a medium-sized all-purpose cruising sailboat .  This versatile sloop is well suited for coastal cruising and some offshore passages.

Dry weight clocks in at 10,200 pounds, with a D/L ratio of 291.43.  This sailboat is an ideal general-purpose cruising vessel.

How Much Does An O’Day 25 Weigh?

Despite being only a few feet shorter than the Catalina 30, the O’Day 25 is a much different boat.  This popular day cruiser has a displacement of only 4,007 pounds, which is less than half of the Catalina 30.  The O’Day 25 falls into the medium weight category with a D/L ratio of only 193.16.  Comparatively, you can immediately see how these two common fiberglass boats differ.  The O’Day 25 will be much easier to tow, yet less suitable for long offshore passages.

How Much Does An Atkin ‘Eric’ 32 Weigh?

This 32-foot wooden sailboat was designed decades ago for offshore sailing.  While dimensionally similar to the Catalina 30, this boat is significantly heftier with a displacement of 19,500 pounds.  Despite only being 2-feet longer than our Catalina at the waterline, the Atkin Eric has a D/L ratio of 418.81 making it an extremely heavy boat!

From a distance, all three of our examples would look similar in size and above-water characteristics.  Below the surface, we find something very different.  Each of these vessels is suitable for different things, and how much they weigh plays a vital role in their uses.  Now that you know how to interpret the weight of a sailboat, you’ll be prepared to choose one that best fits your needs.

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I've personally had thousands of questions about sailing and sailboats over the years. As I learn and experience sailing, and the community, I share the answers that work and make sense to me, here on Life of Sailing.

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How Much Does a Boat Weigh? Understanding Vessel Weight Averages

sailboat trailer weight

Here’s a basic breakdown of average weights by boat type:

  • Aluminum Fishing Boats:  Typically range from  300 – 500 pounds
  • Bow Riders:  Usually weigh around  3,000 – 3,500 pounds
  • Cabin Cruisers:  Often weigh between  12,000 – 16,000 pounds

For larger vessels, the weights can significantly increase. For instance,  medium-sized boats  ranging from  28-35 feet  can weigh between  5,800-13,500 pounds . Even more substantial are  large boats  within the  36-45 feet category , boasting weights anywhere from  15,500-29,000 pounds .

Each type of boat serves a different purpose, and understanding their weight is essential for  handling ,  transport , and  storage . Boat owners and potential buyers must recognize how these weights may impact the boat’s performance, the capacity of their vehicle for trailering, and ultimately, the safety of their journeys on the water.

Types of Boats and Average Weights

When considering the purchase of a boat or preparing to transport one, knowing the average weight is essential. This weight impacts the  necessary trailer , storage options, and potential restrictions on use.

Dinghies and Skiffs

Dinghies and skiffs are small, lightweight boats often used for short-distance travel and fishing in calm waters. Typically, skiffs vary in weight from  300 to 1,000 pounds , depending on materials and length.

Fishing Boats

Fishing boats come in a variety of shapes and sizes, each designed for the specific needs of anglers. Small aluminum fishing boats can be as light as  400 pounds , while larger, more equipped models, like a 20-foot center console boat, might weigh approximately  1,600 to 2,500 pounds .  Average weights for different types of fishing boats  can guide buyers and owners in logistical planning.

The weight of sailboats can significantly vary based upon size, design, and the materials used in construction. A small day sailer might weigh around  700 pounds , while a large keelboat can exceed  10,000 pounds . Sailors must consider this when assessing mooring requirements and dry dock storage.

Pontoon Boats

Pontoon boats are known for their flat, stable platforms and lightweight construction. An average 22-foot pontoon boat may weigh about  2,200 pounds  without the added weight of the engine, fuel, and gear. Pontoons are popular for leisurely trips on calm lakes and rivers.

Speedboats, designed for higher speeds and agility on the water, have a broader weight range. A typical 20-foot speedboat weighs between  2,500 to 3,500 pounds , influenced by the hull material and additional features for performance.

Cabin Cruisers

Cabin cruisers provide comfort and amenities for extended stays on the water and are consequently heavier. On average, a 14-foot cabin cruiser will typically weigh in the ballpark of  14,000 pounds , with larger models increasingly heavier.  Detailed statistics on cabin cruiser weights  offer insight into the robust infrastructure required for docking and maintenance.

Factors Influencing Boat Weight

sailboat trailer weight

Several variables contribute to the overall weight of boats, each component playing a pivotal role in determining the final measurement. Understanding these factors can assist in anticipating the weight range of a vessel.

Material Construction

The  materials used to build a boat  significantly affect its weight. For instance, boats constructed from  fiberglass  tend to be lighter than those made of wood. On the other hand,  aluminum  boats offer a balance between durability and weight, often being lighter than wood but heavier than fiberglass. Specific data on  boat materials and their weights  help illustrate these distinctions.

Boat Size and Dimensions

The overall length and width  of a boat are directly proportional to its weight. Larger boats have more mass simply due to their size. A boat that falls within a  17-22 feet range  might weigh around  1,600-3,200 pounds , whereas boats that are  23-27 feet long  can weigh between  3,600-4,800 pounds . Dimensions play a crucial role in assessing weight, per details found on a  boating data chart .

Engines and Equipment

The  quantity and size of the engines , along with additional equipment such as electronics and fishing gear, also add to a boat’s weight. More powerful engines and extensive equipment result in a heavier vessel. A detailed  weight calculator  can be leveraged to evaluate the total weight considering such variables, as demonstrated by this  Boat Weight Calculator .

Fuel Capacity

The  capacity of the fuel tank  influences a boat’s weight, as the weight of the fuel must be considered when calculating the total mass. Full fuel tanks can significantly increase the overall weight, which is essential for calculating transport and performance characteristics. Details on the impact of fuel capacity on weight are discussed in  J.D. Power’s boating guide .

Boat Weight and Transportation

When considering transportation for boats, the weight of the boat and its associated gear is a critical factor in choosing the right trailer and tow vehicle.

Trailer Weight Considerations

The weight of the boat is often specified as  dry weight , which does not include fuel, gear, or other items that might be on board during transport. A boat’s dry weight plus the weight of its engine, fuel, and equipment is referred to as the  gross weight , and it’s important to know when selecting a trailer. For example, a  skiff typically weighs between 300 to 900 pounds , which would necessitate a different trailer than a larger vessel such as a cabin cruiser.

The trailer itself also has a  Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) , which is the maximum weight the trailer can safely carry. This includes the boat’s weight, the trailer’s weight, and any additional cargo. Here is a simplified example of boat and trailer weight considerations:

Boat TypeAverage Boat WeightSuitable Trailer GVWR
Skiff300 – 900 lbs1,200 lbs
Sailboat400 – 800 lbs1,500 lbs

Towing Vehicle Requirements

The tow vehicle must be capable of handling the  combined weight  of the boat and the trailer. This is referred to as the  towing capacity . The vehicle’s  owner’s manual  will list the towing capacity which must exceed the combined weight to ensure safe transportation. Trucks and SUVs often have higher towing capacities, with some trucks being able to handle more than  5,000 pounds  easily, including the boat and the trailer weight.

When selecting a vehicle for towing, one must consider the following factors:

  • Engine Size : Larger engines generally provide more towing power.
  • Transmission : A vehicle with a transmission cooler is preferable for towing, as it helps prevent overheating.
  • Braking System : A robust braking system is vital, as it needs to stop the additional weight safely.
  • Suspension : The vehicle should have a capable suspension system to handle the load and maintain stability.

Weight Capacities of Boats

When discussing the weight capacities of boats, one needs to closely examine not only the manufacturer’s specifications but also the safety compliance ratings to ensure a secure and enjoyable boating experience.

Manufacturer Specifications

Boat manufacturers typically provide a boat’s weight capacity in their specifications. For instance, small boats might have a weight capacity of several hundred pounds while larger boats can hold weights of several thousand pounds.  Boat Weight Capacity Calculator – GEGCalculators  provides estimated weight capacities for various boat lengths, but stresses that these can vary due to design and construction differences.

Safety Compliance Ratings

Safety compliance ratings, such as those established by the U.S. Coast Guard, are essential for determining how much weight a boat can safely carry. These ratings incorporate an average weight per person to calculate the maximum number of passengers. As per  BOATERexam.com® , many manufacturers use an average weight of 150 pounds per person for these calculations. However, if passengers are heavier than this average, the number of people on the boat may need to be reduced to stay within safe operational limits.

Measuring Boat Weight

Assessing a boat’s weight involves understanding the distinctions between dry weight and wet weight, as well as utilizing specific tools to determine the mass accurately.

Dry Weight Vs. Wet Weight

Dry Weight  refers to the boat’s mass without any consumables or gear. This includes only the hull and installed equipment such as the engine and built-in fixtures. It is the base weight of the boat when it’s not in use and is crucial for transportation and storage considerations.

  • Fluids (e.g., fuel, oil, freshwater)
  • Equipment and safety gear
  • Personal belongings and provisions

Wet weight is most relevant for operational purposes, such as compliance with safety regulations and determining the boat’s performance and fuel efficiency.

Tools for Weighing Boats

To measure a boat’s weight,  marine scales  or  crane scales  are typically employed.

  • Marine Scales : These are specialized scales designed to accommodate a boat’s size and shape. They are often found at marinas and boatyards.
  • Crane Scales : For larger vessels, crane scales may be used. These are attached to a crane that lifts the boat, measuring its weight through tension.

It is essential to consult the boat’s manufacturer or a professional weighmaster to ensure accurate measurements, particularly when the data will be used for legal or commercial purposes.

Frequently Asked Questions

sailboat trailer weight

Understanding the weight of different types of boats and the factors that contribute to it is essential for safe operation and transportation. This section addresses common queries related to boat weight.

What is the average weight range for fiberglass boats?

The average weight range for fiberglass boats can vary widely, but generally, a mid-sized fiberglass boat can weigh anywhere from 2,500 to 15,000 pounds.

How can you calculate the weight of a boat including its trailer?

To calculate the weight of a boat including its trailer, one must first determine the boat’s dry weight and then add the weight of the trailer, which is typically between 300 to 1,500 pounds. The weight of any additional gear or fuel should also be included in the calculation.

What are the typical weight considerations for towing a boat?

When towing a boat, weight considerations include the boat’s dry weight, the weight of the trailer, and the weight of gear, fuel, and any other items aboard. The towing vehicle’s maximum towing capacity must not be exceeded.

What’s the approximate weight of a small (12-16 foot) boat?

A small boat measuring between 12 to 16 feet can weigh between 100 to 1,200 pounds, depending on the design and materials used.

How does boat length impact the overall weight?

Boat length significantly impacts overall weight. Generally, as a boat’s length increases, so does its weight, due to larger hulls, bigger engines, and extra features or equipment.

Where can one find a reliable boat weight calculator?

A reliable boat weight calculator can help estimate the total weight of a boat including gear and fuel. One can find this tool on boating websites or by contacting manufacturers directly.

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Weight of 26 Hunter, loaded on trailer

  • Thread starter Teresa & Cliff Vogel
  • Start date Oct 3, 2007
  • Hunter Owner Forums
  • Smaller Boats

Teresa & Cliff Vogel

Can anyone give us a fairly close idea of how much the 26 Hunter weights when on trailer (including trailer weight)& with water ballast drained ?? Thanks. T Vogel  

Boat specs. The boat specs lists its displacement at 5,000 pounds with a ballast of 2,000 pounds. Sitting on the trailer with the ballast tank empty you have a starting weight of 3,000 pounds. Add an outboard engine, fuel, batteries, anchor, provisions, water and all the other suff you keep aboard it should weight at least 4,000 pounds. With a 1,500 pounds trailer you are looking at a towing weight of 5,500 pounds.  

Mergatroid

Just weighed mine last week 4760 on the trailer axles + tongue weight of 520, 5280 give or take a few pounds.  

Mine... Heading out with enough stuff for a couple of weeks - 6,000. I've weighed it several times. That doesn't include the tongue weight which I estimate at 700 lbs.  

26' Hunter, boat & trailer weight Thanks so much! This is exactly what we were guestimating.... We aren't hauling her filled to live aboard, just hauling her home empty to store for the winter. There is no water, food, or extras packed on the boat. She's pretty much empty. Really appreciate your response. Just what I wanted to hear!! Teresa & Cliff, Kent, Ohio  

26' Hunter, boat & trailer weight for hauling Thanks ever so much! We figure that without storing water, clothing, food and extras your estimate is just about right!! We are hauling it home from Eastern Pennsylvania after just purchasing her. The Pennsylvannia Dept. of Transportation, sure makes obtaining a hauling permit seriously difficult. We are frazzled. Got any suggestions and advise on that?? Thanks in advance for your response. We know we are going to LOVE this boat. Teresa & Cliff Kent, Ohio  

Hitch and go In the five years I've been reading the posts on this site, the consensus has been to go without permits. That is what most us are doing and I can't recall a sinle posting of someone being stopped. Lots of discussion about whether your insurance would cover you if you had an accident, but no one seems to have ever had the misfortune. You are 6 inches over in most states, however, it seems that few autorities are concerned with recreational boaters and the round contours of the hull make it difficult to guage, let alone, measure.  

Permit ! We don't need no stinking permit ! Never even considered that the boat may be out of spec for hauling on highway. I have never heard of anyone being stopped or questioned. As was stated, motor carrier enforcement is concerned with commercial vehicles and they enforce those regs. Doubt you would ever, ever be bothered. Also, I was an agent for one of the big three insurance writers for over ten years and have a hard time believing that a claim could be denied on such an esoteric point. Base your argument on the Full Faith and Credit clause in the Constitution. What is acceptable in one state entitles you to coverage in any state. Heck, some states don't require plates on trailers. Ticket you in their jurisdiction, yes, but coverage would be extended by your company in all 50 states and the great white north.  

weight and width my 260 with all the stuff weighs in at 6000 lbs down the road, including tongue weight, about 600 lbs. I've towed all over the western US and mexico and never had a problem with being over width.  

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COMMENTS

  1. How Much Does a Boat and Trailer Weigh?

    Single-axle boat trailers typically weigh up to about 600 lbs and have a capacity up to about 3,300 lbs. Tandem-axle boat trailers usually weigh up to around 1,000 lbs. Some tandem-axle trailers can support boats up to around 8,000 lbs, but this is about the weight at which you'd start considering a triple-axle trailer.

  2. How Much Do Boat Trailers Weigh? 9 Examples (With Pictures)

    The McClain 12' to 14' Single Axle Aluminum Jon Boat Trailer. This trailer is a single axle trailer that can hold a 12' to 14' boat. It has a 20' winch strap with a winch stand. The overall length of this trailer is 15'6" and its tires are 8" each. The trailer can hold 400 pounds and has a weight of 150 pounds itself.

  3. How Much Does a Boat Trailer Weigh? (Chart)

    Ski boat. These vessels need to have a sizable storing space for fishing gear so that you can expect a higher weight capacity. Their average weight is 1,000 to 3,000 pounds (453.5 - 1,361 kg). The best option for such boats is a single-axle trailer weighing 300 to 600 pounds (136 - 272 kg).

  4. How much does a boat trailer weigh? 2024

    Aluminum and fiberglass boat trailers also differ in estimated weight. Aluminum boat trailers range in length from 12 to 20 feet. Trailers between 12 and 15 feet long typically weigh about 200 ...

  5. How Much Does A Boat Trailer Weigh? (With Examples)

    On average, boat trailers that are 14 feet in length generally weigh around 150 pounds only. However, they can only carry a boat with a weight of 400 pounds. The big ones, like trailers that span 28 feet in length, can weigh up to 1,600 pounds. However, they have much more power and can carry about 8,000 pounds.

  6. Boat Weights & Trailers: Types & Towing Tips

    Due to their size and weight, you'll need a heavy-duty truck and a sturdy boat trailer with tandem or triple axles to tow these vessels. Sailboats (4,000-20,000+ lbs, 20-50+ feet) Sailboats can vary greatly in weight, depending on their size, hull material, and rigging.

  7. How Much Does a Boat Trailer Weigh?

    Let's suppose your average boat trailer weight is 4,600 pounds. Drive off the scale, detach the trailer, and return to the scale to weigh the truck alone; let's assume it weighs 4,200 pounds. The tongue weight is the difference (4,600-4,200=400). If you don't have access to a truck scale, you may calculate tongue weight in your driveway.

  8. How to Choose a Boat Trailer

    Typically, a single-axle trailer can accommodate a boat up to 22' (6.7 m) or 23' (7.01 m) with a maximum weight of 3,300 lbs. (1,369 kg) to 3,500 lbs. (1,587 kg). They cost less, require less maintenance and are easier to move around manually than dual-axle models. Trailers with two or more axles are for larger boats.

  9. How Much Does a Boat Trailer Weigh?

    Tandem axle trailers weigh from 600 lbs up to 1000 lbs and have the ability to handle boats that weigh between 3,300 lbs to as much as 8,000 lbs. That means, on the low end, a double axle trailer could weigh as little as 3,900 lbs to as much as 9,000 lbs. Triple axle trailers weigh anywhere from 1,000 lbs to 1,600 lbs.

  10. How to Weigh a Boat Trailer

    To find the weight of the trailer, simply subtract the trailer's maximum capacity from the GVWR and you're left with the weight of the trailer. On average, boat trailers weigh anywhere from 200 lbs to 1,600 lbs. Single-axle boat trailers typically weigh up to about 600 lbs and have a capacity up to about 3,300 lbs.

  11. Trailer Weight

    Jan 14, 2022. #2. Hunter 170 displacement is 478 lbs SailboatData.com - HUNTER 170 Sailboat and trailer weight could be 500 - 1000 lbs depending on its construction (aluminum vs .galvanized steel, single vs.tandem axle, installed spare tire, etc.). Suggest contacting Load Rite Boat Trailers | Load Rite Trailers to confirm its curb weight.

  12. Weight Calculator

    Calculating your boat's weight capacity is a critical step for determining your trailer needs. That's where we come in: our tool handles the numbers so you can handle the next adventure. Simply enter your boat's criteria in the calculator below to find out your total capacity. The dry weight is the weight of the boat less motors, fuel ...

  13. Weight Calculator

    Calculated Total Capacity: Please enter data in all fields. * Fuel weight is auto-calculated using 6.2 lbs per gallon. Water weight is auto-calculated using 8.3 lbs per gallon. These are all estimates. ** Select a trailer with the next highest weight capacity rating and sufficient length capacity for your vessel.

  14. How Much Does a Boat Trailer Weigh?

    October 2, 2023. Written by J. Harvey / Fact checked by S. Numbers. There is no exact boat trailer weight, as different types of trailers have varying weights. Expect the range of the weight of boat trailers to be between 200 pounds to 4,400 pounds. This often depends on the kind of boat it accommodates and the type of the trailer itself.

  15. Boat Trailer Weights: How Much Do Boat Trailers Weigh?

    McClain 14' to 17' Single Axle Aluminum Jon Boat Trailer. Lightweight and simple, this jon boat trailer from McClain is made from aluminum giving it superior strength despite its low empty weight. The trailer clocks in at a measly 160lbs, but carries up to 640lbs of cargo.

  16. A Guide to Trailer Weights by Trailer Type

    For this type of trailer, the empty weight ranges from 1,100 to 4,400 pounds, and the average is about 2,200 pounds. When loaded with a large boat, the trailer weight increases greatly. The capacity depends on the build of the trailer and its configuration. GVWR can be as low as 5,400 pounds or as high as 34,400 pounds.

  17. How Much Do Boats Weigh? (Ultimate Data Chart)

    Package weight/gross trailer weight. Package weight, also known as gross trailer weight (GTW), is the wet weight of your boat plus the weight of your trailer. This is the weight you need to know for towing. Most trailers weigh around 600 pounds for small 17′ boats to 1,900 pounds for larger 26′ boats.

  18. Average Boat Weights (With 25 examples): Can you tow it?

    8,700 lbs. Trucks. *PWCs. 850 lbs. Cars, Vans, Trucks and SUVs. Keep in mind that these average weights are the dry weight of these boat types. The weight of fuel the fuel, trailer, and other accessories can add up to 2,000 lbs to these average weights which can highly impact their ability to be towed.

  19. Towing Weights of O'Day boats

    The O'Day 26 minimum trailer weight (without anything extra, like food, water, etc. aboard) is just about 4000lbs. Add an outboard, gear, and other stuff you might want to keep on board while you trailer, and the weight will just go up.u000bu000bI use a 1978 Suburban with a 454cu for towing, it's a bit of overkill, but I got it cheap. E.

  20. Average Sailboat Weight (With 7 Examples)

    You can expect an average sailboat weight to be about 8,000 pounds (3,629 kg). Most sailboat trailers weigh about 1,200 pounds (544 kg). The average sailboat weight varies depending on the length from 2,000 pounds (907 kg) on average for 14 to 24 feet in length and up to 30,000 pounds (13,608 kg) for larger yacht style sailboats from 40 to 50 ...

  21. How Much Does A Sailboat Weigh?

    This average sailboat weight is without taking into account additional gear, fuel, people, and more that are on a sailboat out on the water. To accurately weigh a boat isn't as simple as dropping it on a scale. ... Light (race or trailer-sailboat): 90-179; Medium (day boat/light cruiser): 180-269; Heavy (cruising sailboat /offshore cruiser ...

  22. How Much Does A Boat Weigh? Understanding Vessel Weight Averages

    Here is a simplified example of boat and trailer weight considerations: Boat Type Average Boat Weight Suitable Trailer GVWR; Skiff: 300 - 900 lbs: 1,200 lbs: Sailboat: 400 - 800 lbs: 1,500 lbs: Towing Vehicle Requirements. The tow vehicle must be capable of handling the combined weight of the boat and the trailer.

  23. Best Tips for Towing a Boat Trailer

    The weight of the fully loaded boat and trailer cannot exceed the towing capacity of the vehicle. Parts Needed Photo by Curt. Trailer Hitch Receiver - The trailer hitch receiver is bolted to the vehicle's frame. It provides an opening, usually 1-1/4" or 2", that's used for installing a towing accessory such as a ball mount. ...

  24. Weight of 26 Hunter, loaded on trailer

    Boat specs. The boat specs lists its displacement at 5,000 pounds with a ballast of 2,000 pounds. Sitting on the trailer with the ballast tank empty you have a starting weight of 3,000 pounds. Add an outboard engine, fuel, batteries, anchor, provisions, water and all the other suff you keep aboard it should weight at least 4,000 pounds.