Using Ghost with GitHub: The Complete Step-by-Step Guide

ghost github actions

At LayeredCraft, we're big on automating repetitive tasks and finding ways to make our development process more efficient. But even we have to admit – keeping a local testing site and production site in sync is a challenge, even with Ghost.

Today we’re going to show you how LayeredCraft develops and tests our Ghost themes on local servers (our own computers) and then deploys updates to a live production server.

Whether you’re a seasoned theme developer or simply run a Ghost website and want to make some custom modifications to your theme, using GitHub and GitHub Actions to manage your theme files and deployments is incredibly useful to know and can save you a lot of time and effort!

How It All Works

Let’s take a look at the workflow for using GitHub for Ghost theme development. Don’t worry if some steps are unclear at this point, we’ll cover them later on in the tutorial.

  • You have a repository on GitHub where you’ll store the source code for your Ghost theme
  • You download (or “pull” in Git terms) the repository from GitHub and save it on your local machine.
  • Now you can work on the project on your local computer. After you’ve made your changes, you can upload (or “push” in Git terms) them back to GitHub.
  • Using GitHub Actions, when you push changes into your GitHub repository, the theme source code will automatically be deployed to your production Ghost site.

Before We Get Started

To get started you’ll need to get yourself these four things:

  • A local Ghost server Having a local server for Ghost on your computer is the first step for developing a new or modifying an existing Ghost theme. For a detailed how-to guide on getting a local server up and running, check out the official guide from Ghost .
  • A production Ghost server If you don’t yet have a production server for your Ghost website, there are two excellent options we recommend. You can find out about them on our website . We also published a guide to setting up a Ghost Blog in Just One Click on DigitalOcean .
  • A GitHub account GitHub is where you’ll store the source code for your Ghost theme and where deployments will be automated from. A GitHub account and some basic familiarity with Git and GitHub would be useful here and to help you with that, check out this excellent guide by the official GitHub team.
  • The GitHub App The official GitHub app for Mac or Windows is what we’ll be using to manage our repository, including “pushing” and “pulling” code changes to and from GitHub.

Step 1: Create a GitHub Repository

The first step is to login to your GitHub account and create a new repository . You can name the repository anything you’d like or simply give it the name of the theme you are working on. For this tutorial I’m going use the name my-ghost-theme .

ghost github actions

Once created, you’ll see the screen below. You can ignore most of the instructions on this page and click the Set up in Desktop button to open the GitHub app where we’ll finish the rest of the setup.

ghost github actions

The GitHub app should open up and from there the Repository URL field will be auto-populated with your repository URL.

ghost github actions

For Local Path navigate to the content/themes folder where you installed Ghost on your computer and click Open .

ghost github actions

Lastly, click the Clone button to download the repository to the themes folder. You should end up with the following screen:

ghost github actions

You’ll notice that the GitHub app created a new folder in the content/themes of your Ghost install. Don’t worry, it should be empty.

ghost github actions

Step 2: Add Theme Files To Your GitHub Repository

Nest step is to copy and paste all of the files from your existing Ghost theme into the new theme folder that was created in Step 1.

In this example I’m copying my themes files from an existing theme called docuhub into my newly created theme folder my-ghost-theme from GitHub.

ghost github actions

Then, paste the copied theme files into your new theme folder.

ghost github actions

Head back over to the GitHub app and you should now see it has automatically populated itself with a list of files in the left side panel. This list represents the “uncommitted” changes to the repository (the theme files you copied and pasted but have not yet “pushed” to GitHub).

ghost github actions

In order to “commit” these changes, we’ll need to add a Summary (a brief note describing the changes you’ve made) and then click the Commit to master button.

Finally, click the Publish branch button to “push” our changes to GitHub.

Step 3: Add Custom Ghost Integration

To setup automated deployments, head over to your production Ghost site and create a new Custom Integration in Ghost Admin » Integrations

You can name the new integration something like: Deploy Ghost Theme .

ghost github actions

Once you’ve created the integration, make a note of these two values: Admin API Key and API URL . We’ll need them in the next step.

ghost github actions

Step 4: Add GitHub Repository Secrets

Next, we’re going to head back over to your repository page on GitHub, navigate to Settings > Secrets page.

ghost github actions

Create two new secrets. The first one called GHOST_ADMIN_API_KEY containing the Admin API Key . The second one called GHOST_ADMIN_API_URL containing the API URL .

ghost github actions

Step 5: Add GitHub Deploy Config for Ghost

Inside the theme folder on your computer, create a config file called .github/workflows/deploy-theme.yml (this is a hidden folder and may only appear in your code editor) and copy the following code into it.

Once you added this file, commit and push your changes to the remote repository using the GitHub app (just like in Step 2).

Now your repository is configured to trigger a deployment for every commit that is pushed to it. You have the possibility to customize the trigger to different branches, pull requests and more. To find out more, check out the official GitHub Action Documentation .

And there you have it! You can now make code changes to your Ghost theme on your local machine, push them to GitHub for safe keeping while automatically deploying the changes to your production Ghost site. Pretty nifty!

If you have and questions or if you’ve successfully setup GitHub with your Ghost theme, we’d love to hear about it! Tweet us @layeredcraft !

ghost github actions

Eric Alli @ericalli

Eric is the founder of LayeredCraft. He has worked as a designer and engineer for 15+ years and loves creating innovative and effective themes for all industries.

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Ghost Blog on GitHub Pages using GitHub Actions

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In this post I will share how I built up this website for free using Ghost CMS, GitHub Pages, and GitHub Actions.

Ghost is a content management system for self publishing your own website - and it can be self hosted in a Docker container. To start this project you need to be running the Ghost Docker container on your development computer. This means you need to have Docker installed locally - and there is a handy guide on the Docker website for the main operating systems.

Before starting up the Ghost Docker container you will need a directory where you can store the Ghost content (static assets, SQL database, etc). For this post I setup a new repository in GitHub to store the content so it would stay under version control.

To start the Ghost Docker container on your local machine, open a console and navigate to the directory you have setup with a GitHub repository and execute the following command.

docker run -d -p 2368:2368 -v content:/var/lib/ghost/content ghost:alpine

This command will run up the latest version of Ghost using the alpine Docker image . It will run on the standard 2368 port and mount the current content directory into the Docker container at /var/lib/ghost/content . This means that any changes to the Ghost instance (new posts, theme, etc) will be exposed to the current working folder and can be committed to GitHub.

After running the command, you should be able to access the locally running version of Ghost at http:// localhost:2368/ . At first you will need to setup an account (only saved in your local database), and then you will be able to add new pages, posts, and change the navigation settings etc. You will also be able to configure the theme for your website.

GitHub Workflow

Once there is a locally running instance of Ghost, the next step is to get it running in GitHub Pages. The key to do this is using GitHub Actions with the help of a GitHub workflow. To setup a GitHub workflow you need to add a .github\workflows folder. Each GitHub workflow is just a yaml file within this directory.

In the first section, the trigger is configured. This means that this GitHub workflow will run when a commit is made on the main branch.

The scripts section defines the different scripts that will run one after the other during the GitHub workflow. The first simply checks out the latest version of the code to the build instance.

The next script is similar to the command we use to run Ghost locally. This will actually run up the instance of Ghost on the GitHub Actions build virtual machine. The main difference here is the use of the build parameter ${{ github.workspace }} to access the path to the working directory of the build folder.

As Ghost can take a few seconds to start up, a wait script is added to pause the process for 10 seconds.

Once enough time has passed, the next script installs globally a npm script that can crawl the Ghost instance and generate a static version of the website.

The next script will run this tool to do the crawl and generate a static version of the website into a folder called static . The --url property is used to specify the base domain of the static website (in this case a GitHub Pages site). The --subDir property is used to specify a sub folder of the static website (in this case the name of the GitHub Pages project name).

Finally the last script will deploy the static folder which contains our website to the gh-pages branch of the repository so that it is available on GitHub Pages.

GitHub Pages

The last stage of this project is to enable GitHub Pages on your repository.  This is done via the Pages tab in the repository settings .

ghost github actions

After updating your blog using the Ghost admin website and push push to the main branch the changes, the ghost blog will be started in a docker container on the GitHub Actions server, a static version will be crawled automatically and then saved to the GitHub pages branch of the repository. A few minutes later, your website will be running on your GitHub Pages website.

There is a demonstration repository available here which demonstrates the GitHub Actions and GitHub Pages project.

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Private repository to build and deploy ghost blog, scheduled posts with ghost and github actions, custom domain for static ghost blog on github pages, popular tags.

How to set up Ghost CMS with a custom theme via GitHub Actions

Benjamin Pazdernik

Benjamin Pazdernik

So I started this blog with Ghost CMS after a lot of back and forth between different content management systems. In the past, I built dozen of WordPress pages (for clients and myself) and always hated the bloat, that came with it. Also, the process of front-end development was just ... well, a nightmare. 😱

I then dabbled with flat-file systems like Hugo , Gatsby and Statamic - but in the end, I just didn't write anything, because I disliked the writing experience of "pure" Markdown.

In this post, we'll go over

  • How to install Ghost locally.
  • How to install a custom or downloaded theme for local development.
  • How to connect your local Ghost instance with the production site via GitHub actions to automatically push theme changes from local to production.

My setup with Ghost 👻

The Ghost CMS is set up on a Digital Ocean droplet , which comes preconfigured with everything you need. I already use Digital Ocean for all of my client hosting and love the simplicity of the backend and the performance you get for the price.

I use the truly minimalistic but elegant theme Attila from zutrinken (available on GitHub ). It is minimal in the sense of being typography-focused, easily customizable, and not bloated with too many bells and whistles.

Screenshot of the Ghost theme "Attila" from GitHub user "zutrinken".

Getting the local environment ready  ⚙️

Step 1: install ghost locally.

Installing Ghost on your local machine is surprisingly easy and literally took me less than 5 minutes. If you want to step-by-step guide just follow the documentation and you'll be set within minutes.

Here is the short version:

With npm or yarn installed, you install the Ghost-CLI first (if you have not already):

Next cd into an empty directory, where you want to install Ghost into and run the install command with local added

That's all! 🎉  The Ghost-CLI handles the database and server part all on its own without the need of any external tools or software.

After the install is finished you’ll be able to access your new site on http://localhost:2368 and http://localhost:2368/ghost to access the Admin panel.

Step 2: Install the theme locally

I had a bit of trouble getting the theme to be "seen" by Ghost and available in the backend to select when I just cloned the theme repository into the themes directory content/themes .

Turns out you need to first upload the theme via the backend (as a .zip), then delete the content in the newly created folder and use that as the base for developing your theme .

Step by Step:

  • Install ghost via ghost install local .
  • Clone your theme repository my-custom-theme into any random location on your computer.
  • Create a .zip of your theme. (If you also use Attila you can build a .zip via the command grunt compress - more on that in the GitHub readme )
  • Start Ghost via ghost start
  • Go to the Ghost backend at domain.com/ghost and upload your theme zip file.
  • Stop Ghost via ghost stop
  • Go to /content/themes and delete the folder my-custom-theme that was created by Ghost.
  • Now clone your my-custom-theme repository within /content/themes .
  • Start Ghost again and now your theme should be selected and changes to the theme should result in changes on the frontend of your Ghost site.

In the end, I had my custom Attila version installed and selected in Ghost and I could develop the theme locally. Yay! 🎉

The Attila theme is built with Grunt so if you change anything in the SCSS files you need to rebuild the assets via grunt build . More information can be found on the GitHub readme for the theme.

Screenshot of my development environment with the website on the left and code editor on the right.

Making the magic happen via GitHub Actions 🪄

So now we have a local development environment and an online production server with Ghost running. Let's hook them up, so that code changes to the theme on the local install, automatically sync to the server (in my case my Digital Ocean Droplet).

ghost github actions

Step 1: Create Custom Integration

Go to your Ghost admin and create a new Custom Integration in Ghost Admin»Integrations and name it something descriptive. This generates a set of Ghost Admin API credentials which you need for Step 2.

Screenshot of a Custom Integration in Ghost CMS for GitHub Actions.

Step 2: Create Secrets in GitHub

On GitHub, navigate to your theme repository, then to Settings and then (left) to Secrets . Create a secret called GHOST_ADMIN_API_URL containing the API URL and another called GHOST_ADMIN_API_KEY containing the Admin API Key.

Just copy both from your Custom Integration, that we created in step 1.

Screenshot of GitHub Secrets in repository

Step 3: Create the config for GitHub Actions

Create a new YAML file named "deploy-theme" like so .github/workflows/deploy-theme.yml and copy-paste the config example from below.

Note : Do not replace the GHOST_ADMIN_API_URL or GHOST_ADMIN_API_KEY as they will use the secrets we created in step 2!

Step 4: Commit & Push! 💪🏻

Commit and push your changes. After your changes are pushed to GitHub, it should trigger the action automatically with every push.

Screenshot of all workflows which GitHub has run because of our GitHub Action setup.

No need to pay – use GitHub Actions for free

You do not need a paid GitHub plan to use this feature. On a free plan (like I have), you get a monthly quota of  2.000 "GitHub Action Minutes".

One theme deployment takes between 15 and 30 seconds (at least for me). So you get approximately 1.000 builds per month, which should be more than enough.

Screenshot of GitHub Account Billing page with focus on the Usage and used Action minutes.

We are done! 🥳

That's it! Now you can work on your theme locally and experiment without touching any production code. And once you are happy, just push and the GitHub Action together with the Ghost Admin API will take care of the rest and deploy your changes to the live site.

I really like this workflow and I'll share updates on my process when I do change something in the future.

How to Deploy Your Ghost Theme Using GitHub Actions

Last week I tried the Deploy Ghost Theme GitHub action. This is an excellent tool for theme deployment and a time saver. This tool helps with theme deployment. This means that instead of uploading your theme to your Ghost blog every time you make a change. You can now deploy your theme every time you push a new update to your theme repository main branch. So, the purpose of the GitHub action is to take the theme from the GitHub repo and send it to your website.

I assume you are familiar with using Git and GitHub, and your theme is already on GitHub.

➊ Create a Custom Ghost Integration

The first step is creating a new Custom Integration in Ghost Admin → Integrations.

You can give the new integration a new name—for example, Deploy Ghost Theme.

Once created the integration, two values will be available, Admin API Key , and API URL .

Custom Ghost Integration

➋ Create GitHub Repository Secrets

On the GitHub theme repository, navigate to Settings > Secrets > Actions .

Create two new secrets. The first is GHOST_ADMIN_API_KEY , containing the Admin API Key . The second is GHOST_ADMIN_API_URL , including the API URL .

GitHub Repository Secrets

➌ Add the Github Deployment Config File

Inside your local theme repository, create a config file called .github/workflows/deploy-theme.yml and copy the following code. Once you have added this file, commit and push your changes to the remote repository.

You are now ready to test and do your first theme deployment. The theme will automatically be deployed whenever you push a new commit to the main repository branch.

On the GitHub theme repository, navigate to Settings > Actions to check the theme deployment actions list.

GitHub Repository Deployment Actions

You can click any action and see more details about it.

GitHub Repository Deployment Action

I hope you find this tutorial helpful.

Latest Ghost Themes

Moshi — The Modern Newsletter Ghost Theme

DEV Community

DEV Community

Norbert Hunyadi

Posted on Jan 8, 2021 • Originally published at bironthemes.com on Jan 8, 2021

How to Deploy Your Ghost Theme with GitHub Actions

The Deploy Ghost Theme GitHub action is a great tool to improve the usual workflow when it comes to updating Ghost Themes. The most common way before was changing the theme files locally, then uploading the zip manually using the Ghost Admin.

But this tool is a much better way of doing theme deployment. I have been using the Deploy Ghost Theme GitHub Action for the last couple of months and not only it is easy to setup, but this can save you a lot of time.

Let's see how you can setup this tool to automatically deploy your Ghost Theme whenever you are pushing changes to your theme repository on GitHub.

Add Custom Ghost Integration

First step is creating a new Custom Integration in Ghost Admin > Integrations . Name your integration, then press Create .

Ghost Admin Custom Integration

This will generate the Admin API Key and Api URL that will be used in the next step.

Add GitHub Repo Secrets

Now, go to your theme repo on Github and go to Settings > Secrets Create two new secrets:

  • GHOST_ADMIN_API_KEY - use the Custom Integration value Admin API Key
  • GHOST_ADMIN_API_URL - use the Custom Integration value Api URL

Github Secrets Ghost CMS

Add GitHub Deploy Config

Once the Custom Integration and the GitHub Secrets are in place you have to add the config file which contains the basic configuration.

Copy and paste the following code into .github/workflows/deploy-theme.yml

This configuration will trigger a deployment for every commit which is pushed to the master branch. You have the possibility to customize the "on" trigger to different branches, pull requests or more. To find out more, check out the official GitHub Action Documentation .

Besides the api-url and api-key there are additional config options available:

  • exclude - list files & folder you would like to exclude (defaults: gulpfile.js and dist/* )
  • theme-name - use this to override the theme-name set in package.json
  • file - specify path to a built zip file (exclude and theme-name will be ignored)

That is it, now when you push a new commit to your repository, the deploy should be triggered, updating your theme.

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Ghost Tips & Tricks #3 / Deploy Your Ghost Theme Using Github Actions

Hello everyone,

This is the third issue of Ghost Tips & Tricks. I will be happy to share with you some practical Ghost tips that I find useful. Brought to you by Aspire Ghost Themes .

Recently, I tried the Deploy Ghost Theme Github action. Wow, this is a great tool for theme deployment and a time saver. This tool helps with theme deployment. This means that instead of uploading your theme to your Ghost blog every time you make a change. You can now deploy your theme every time you push a new update to your theme repository master branch.

I assume you are familiar with using Git and GitHub and your theme is already on GitHub.

1. Create a Custom Ghost Integration

The first step we need is to create a new Custom Integration in Ghost Admin » Integrations.

You can give the new integration a new name. For example, Deploy Ghost Theme.

Once created the integration, two values will be available, Admin API Key , and API URL .

Custom Ghost Integration

2. Create GitHub Repository Secrets

On the GitHub theme repository, navigate to Settings > Secrets .

Create two new secrets. The first one called GHOST_ADMIN_API_KEY containing the Admin API Key . The second one called GHOST_ADMIN_API_URL containing the API URL .

GitHub Repository Secrets

3. Add the Github Deployment Config File

Inside your local theme repository, create a config file called .github/workflows/deploy-theme.yml and copy the following code into it. Once you added this file, commit and push your changes to the remote repository.

You are now ready to test and do your first theme deployment. Every time you push a new commit to the repository master branch, the theme will be deployed automatically.

On the GitHub theme repository, navigate to Settings > Actions to check the theme deployment actions list.

GitHub Repository Deployment Actions

You can click any action and see more details about it.

GitHub Repository Deployment Action

That’s it for today and I hope you find this useful…

Checkout previous parts of the Ghost Tips & Tricks series:

  • Ghost Tips & Tricks #1 / Show Publish Date in the day time with AM and PM format.
  • Ghost Tips & Tricks #2 / Ghost Admin Right to Left (RTL) Support.

Also, I started a Ghost Websites Inspiration series share inspiring websites created with Ghost. I hope you can find it inspiring and useful too.

Hi there, that could be useful in Ghost auto-hosted? Why not using a traditional repo and git?

:slight_smile:

Not sure what you mean by auto-hosted ?

It is indeed using a git repo.

So actions only adds gists functionallity to Ghost writting interface?

With auto-hosted, I mean in our VPS.

No. The purpose is to deploy the theme to your website. Suppose you are developing a theme on your local machine; instead of uploading the theme manually from the admin every time you make a change, you can use this method to automatically upload the theme every time you push to the main repo branch on GitHub.

It works with Ghost Pro or self-hosting.

Deploying a Ghost theme with GitHub actions

Easy update and deployment workflow for Ghost themes with GitHub

As of now, I am still running my custom Ghost theme , although I plan on changing it soon. (Edit: I did).

It’s open-source and available on GitHub at angristan/Casper-XYZ . I update it regularly and keep it synced with the original Casper theme .

A few months ago, the Ghost team came up with action-deploy-theme , an GitHub action to deploy a theme to a Ghost website automatically, right from GitHub!

I have been enjoying it for a while now, so let me share how it works.

ghost github actions

This will work with any Ghost theme. The first step is to push it to a GitHub repo. It doesn’t matter if it’s public or not.

The action lives in .github/workflows/deploy-theme.yml :

It uses the Ghost Admin API to interact with the website.

API keys are available after adding a custom integration :

We need the Admin API key, not the Content API key.

We need the Admin API key, not the Content API key.

Once that’s done, we need to add these in the repo’s secrets:

ghost github actions

And now on, every commit to the master branch will deploy an updated version of the theme.

ghost github actions

Once the action has successfully run, I usually check in the design settings of my blog to see if the theme has been updated, and then I clear the different cache systems I have in front of the blog.

ghost github actions

I really enjoy this workflow. I don’t have to manually build and upload the theme anymore. 👏

Understanding GitHub Actions

Learn the basics of GitHub Actions, including core concepts and essential terminology.

In this article

GitHub Actions is a continuous integration and continuous delivery (CI/CD) platform that allows you to automate your build, test, and deployment pipeline. You can create workflows that build and test every pull request to your repository, or deploy merged pull requests to production.

GitHub Actions goes beyond just DevOps and lets you run workflows when other events happen in your repository. For example, you can run a workflow to automatically add the appropriate labels whenever someone creates a new issue in your repository.

GitHub provides Linux, Windows, and macOS virtual machines to run your workflows, or you can host your own self-hosted runners in your own data center or cloud infrastructure.

The components of GitHub Actions

You can configure a GitHub Actions workflow to be triggered when an event occurs in your repository, such as a pull request being opened or an issue being created. Your workflow contains one or more jobs which can run in sequential order or in parallel. Each job will run inside its own virtual machine runner , or inside a container, and has one or more steps that either run a script that you define or run an action , which is a reusable extension that can simplify your workflow.

Diagram of an event triggering Runner 1 to run Job 1, which triggers Runner 2 to run Job 2. Each of the jobs is broken into multiple steps.

A workflow is a configurable automated process that will run one or more jobs. Workflows are defined by a YAML file checked in to your repository and will run when triggered by an event in your repository, or they can be triggered manually, or at a defined schedule.

Workflows are defined in the .github/workflows directory in a repository, and a repository can have multiple workflows, each of which can perform a different set of tasks. For example, you can have one workflow to build and test pull requests, another workflow to deploy your application every time a release is created, and still another workflow that adds a label every time someone opens a new issue.

You can reference a workflow within another workflow. For more information, see " Reusing workflows ."

For more information about workflows, see " Using workflows ."

An event is a specific activity in a repository that triggers a workflow run. For example, activity can originate from GitHub when someone creates a pull request, opens an issue, or pushes a commit to a repository. You can also trigger a workflow to run on a schedule , by posting to a REST API , or manually.

For a complete list of events that can be used to trigger workflows, see Events that trigger workflows .

A job is a set of steps in a workflow that is executed on the same runner. Each step is either a shell script that will be executed, or an action that will be run. Steps are executed in order and are dependent on each other. Since each step is executed on the same runner, you can share data from one step to another. For example, you can have a step that builds your application followed by a step that tests the application that was built.

You can configure a job's dependencies with other jobs; by default, jobs have no dependencies and run in parallel with each other. When a job takes a dependency on another job, it will wait for the dependent job to complete before it can run. For example, you may have multiple build jobs for different architectures that have no dependencies, and a packaging job that is dependent on those jobs. The build jobs will run in parallel, and when they have all completed successfully, the packaging job will run.

For more information about jobs, see " Using jobs ."

An action is a custom application for the GitHub Actions platform that performs a complex but frequently repeated task. Use an action to help reduce the amount of repetitive code that you write in your workflow files. An action can pull your git repository from GitHub, set up the correct toolchain for your build environment, or set up the authentication to your cloud provider.

You can write your own actions, or you can find actions to use in your workflows in the GitHub Marketplace.

For more information, see " Creating actions ."

A runner is a server that runs your workflows when they're triggered. Each runner can run a single job at a time. GitHub provides Ubuntu Linux, Microsoft Windows, and macOS runners to run your workflows; each workflow run executes in a fresh, newly-provisioned virtual machine. GitHub also offers larger runners, which are available in larger configurations. For more information, see " About larger runners ." If you need a different operating system or require a specific hardware configuration, you can host your own runners. For more information about self-hosted runners, see " Hosting your own runners ."

Create an example workflow

GitHub Actions uses YAML syntax to define the workflow. Each workflow is stored as a separate YAML file in your code repository, in a directory named .github/workflows .

You can create an example workflow in your repository that automatically triggers a series of commands whenever code is pushed. In this workflow, GitHub Actions checks out the pushed code, installs the bats testing framework, and runs a basic command to output the bats version: bats -v .

In your repository, create the .github/workflows/ directory to store your workflow files.

In the .github/workflows/ directory, create a new file called learn-github-actions.yml and add the following code.

Commit these changes and push them to your GitHub repository.

Your new GitHub Actions workflow file is now installed in your repository and will run automatically each time someone pushes a change to the repository. To see the details about a workflow's execution history, see " Viewing the activity for a workflow run ."

Understanding the workflow file

To help you understand how YAML syntax is used to create a workflow file, this section explains each line of the introduction's example:

Optional - The name of the workflow as it will appear in the "Actions" tab of the GitHub repository. If this field is omitted, the name of the workflow file will be used instead.

Optional - The name for workflow runs generated from the workflow, which will appear in the list of workflow runs on your repository's "Actions" tab. This example uses an expression with the github context to display the username of the actor that triggered the workflow run. For more information, see " Workflow syntax for GitHub Actions ."

Specifies the trigger for this workflow. This example uses the push event, so a workflow run is triggered every time someone pushes a change to the repository or merges a pull request. This is triggered by a push to every branch; for examples of syntax that runs only on pushes to specific branches, paths, or tags, see " Workflow syntax for GitHub Actions ."

Groups together all the jobs that run in the learn-github-actions workflow.

Defines a job named check-bats-version . The child keys will define properties of the job.

Configures the job to run on the latest version of an Ubuntu Linux runner. This means that the job will execute on a fresh virtual machine hosted by GitHub. For syntax examples using other runners, see " Workflow syntax for GitHub Actions "

Groups together all the steps that run in the check-bats-version job. Each item nested under this section is a separate action or shell script.

The uses keyword specifies that this step will run v4 of the actions/checkout action. This is an action that checks out your repository onto the runner, allowing you to run scripts or other actions against your code (such as build and test tools). You should use the checkout action any time your workflow will use the repository's code.

This step uses the actions/setup-node@v3 action to install the specified version of the Node.js. (This example uses version 14.) This puts both the node and npm commands in your PATH .

The run keyword tells the job to execute a command on the runner. In this case, you are using npm to install the bats software testing package.

Finally, you'll run the bats command with a parameter that outputs the software version.

Visualizing the workflow file

In this diagram, you can see the workflow file you just created and how the GitHub Actions components are organized in a hierarchy. Each step executes a single action or shell script. Steps 1 and 2 run actions, while steps 3 and 4 run shell scripts. To find more prebuilt actions for your workflows, see " Finding and customizing actions ."

Diagram showing the trigger, runner, and job of a workflow. The job is broken into 4 steps.

Viewing the activity for a workflow run

When your workflow is triggered, a workflow run is created that executes the workflow. After a workflow run has started, you can see a visualization graph of the run's progress and view each step's activity on GitHub.

On GitHub.com, navigate to the main page of the repository.

Under your repository name, click Actions .

Screenshot of the tabs for the "github/docs" repository. The "Actions" tab is highlighted with an orange outline.

In the left sidebar, click the workflow you want to see.

Screenshot of the left sidebar of the "Actions" tab. A workflow, "CodeQL," is outlined in dark orange.

From the list of workflow runs, click the name of the run to see the workflow run summary.

In the left sidebar or in the visualization graph, click the job you want to see.

To view the results of a step, click the step.

GitHub Actions can help you automate nearly every aspect of your application development processes. Ready to get started? Here are some helpful resources for taking your next steps with GitHub Actions:

  • For a quick way to create a GitHub Actions workflow, see " Using starter workflows ."
  • For continuous integration (CI) workflows to build and test your code, see " Automating builds and tests ."
  • For building and publishing packages, see " Publishing packages ."
  • For deploying projects, see " Deployment ."
  • For automating tasks and processes on GitHub, see " Managing issues and pull requests ."
  • For examples that demonstrate more complex features of GitHub Actions, including many of the above use cases, see " Examples ." You can see detailed examples that explain how to test your code on a runner, access the GitHub CLI, and use advanced features such as concurrency and test matrices.

ghost github actions

How to Deploy & Manage your Ghost Theme with any Pipeline

ghost github actions

Ghost is a free and open-source blogging platform. You can use the default, an existing free or paid theme, or build your own one. If you are reading this post, it is because you are thinking of using Ghost or you are already using it and you are looking to implement a Continuous Integration of your theme. To deploy a Ghost theme, exists several ways to achieve this goal.

Manually deployment

This method is really easy and can be considered if you choose to use a paid theme or a free one that is not frequently updated. This method consists of uploading the package (zip file) for each new version of the theme via the Ghost admin interface to overwrite the previous one:

ghost github actions

As you can imagine, if you choose to deploy frequently your own theme, this method can become quickly tedious.

Use FTP access to Update Files

When I created my first Ghost theme, I created the first version and uploaded it to my Ghost blog. I quickly understood that it will not be possible to upload a new version manually for each change especially at the beginning; when you create a new theme, you will improve it and fix several little issues. Once you upload your theme, Ghost creates a folder located at /var/lib/ghost/content/themes/<YOUR_GHOST_THEME_FOLDER>/ (when you use the Docker image). Once the folder is created, it is possible to change each file directly into this folder to update your theme. With this information in mind, you can create FTP access to this folder and create a pipeline, a scheduled task, a flow, or whatever to upload the new versions of the files into this folder directly. One more thing ☝🏻 In production mode, template files are loaded and cached by the server. For any change in a hbs file to be reflected, you must restart your Ghost service by command line or by restarting your Docker container.

GitHub Action

As a developer, you use a repository to store your code and the versions of it ☺️ If this repository happens to be stored into GitHub, the Ghost team has created a GitHub Action to set up a simple continuous integration of your Ghost theme to deploy it directly to your Ghost website 🥳🤩

ghost github actions

This method is the best way to update your Ghost theme automatically without any additional manual action. But, what happens if you are not using GitHub? Let's see the last part of my post 😉

Use Ghost API

ghost github actions

Whatever the environment on which you are working, GitHub, GitLab, DevOps, etc. from the moment you can trigger a pipeline it is possible to create a Continuous Deployment and update automatically your Ghost theme quite easily. Based on the Gulp file available on the Casper theme, it is easy to add a npm task to deploy your theme. The most important part before deploying a theme package is the zip task.

Create a Zip

To create the zip package, execute the npm command below:

Add Deploy Task

To add the deployment task, you must edit the gulpfile.js by adding:

This JavaScript function allows you to upload the Ghost theme zip file and activate this one.

[note] Note Create the zip file is a prerequisite. To ensure the task that allows to create the zip file has been executed, it is possible to change the export by exports.deploy = series(zip, deploy);
[info] Important This sample uses the Ghost v4 API

Then, edit the package.json file by adding a new scripts node:

Environment variables

To deploy the theme into your Ghost site, you must specify some environment variables for your pipeline:

  • GHOST_API_URL : this is the URL of your Ghost site. Example: https://blog.mydomain.com
  • GHOST_ADMIN_API_KEY : this is an Admin Key generated from the Ghost admin interface (as explained from the GitHub Action)

Once your zip file is ready and your variables defined, you can launch the deployment from your pipeline by executing the npm command below:

Test locally

Now that your solution can be deployed from a pipeline, here is a solution to test the deployment locally. The best way is to create a .env file at the root folder of the solution with the following content:

To manage .env file, it is necessary to install dotenv module and add some lines into the gulpfile.js . First of all, install the new dev dependency:

To be able to read the .env file, add the following lines under all imports:

Last one thing! it is necessary to update the deploy task from gulpfile.js like this:

Here you go! You just have to launch the following command to deploy the theme manually:

I am using this solution for my own Ghost theme. You can find this configuration on my repo, here:

ghost github actions

Happy deployment 💪🏻🥳 Hoping this post will help you 😉

  • Development
  • Getting Started

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ghost github actions

Deploy Ghost Theme with Github Actions

In this tutorial I will show you how to manage Ghost theme versioning with Github and setup auto-deploy with Github Actions. With this workflow you can easily develop your theme locally, push code changes to your Github and auto-deploy new versions on your Ghost server once ready and without manual copy paste, download and upload.

Preparation

Prerequisites.

First we need a local development environment with a Ghost installation. If you have not setup this yet you can check out my Ghost Starter Theme in my Github repo.

In addition we need a fresh Github repository that we use for our theme and a production ready server running our Ghost installation including a DNS entry for our hosted domain. If you don’t have a server yet you can easily spin-up a server using e.g. Hetzner cloud. Using my ref link will earn you 20 Euro for free. [Link](https://hetzner.cloud/?ref=ir0WnxeEHrmU)

Get API Keys

First we need to get our API keys that we will use to publish our theme on the production server. Login to your installation on your Webserver and navigate to Settings and Integrations . Here you select Add Custom Integration

ghost github actions

After choosing a name (select anything you like) the integration it will display the Admin API Key . The API URL should be the same as your installation URL (basically your domain).

We will now head over to Github and open the fresh repository we just created for our project. On the repo go to Settings and scroll down until Secrets . Select Actions to define new Action Secrets. Create two new Secrets GHOST_ADMIN_API_KEY and GHOST_ADMIN_API_URL by passing the previous API strings from your Ghost installation.

ghost github actions

Github Action

In your local theme folder add another folder structure .github/workflows (attention: The dot is mandatory here) and add a new file deploy-theme.yml into that folder.

The .github folder is a special folder used by Github repositories and makes it easy to manage workflows and other repo specific files via IDE.

In the deploy-theme.yml file we add the following lines:

With the on: workflow_disptach we define that the workflow will only run on manual trigger. Basically it would also be possible to create automatic deployment triggers like „with every release“ or „with every push“ but for the start I recommend using the manual trigger only. With this you can always control when a theme change would be deployed on your production server and be live for your visitors.

Next we will define our so called jobs . The first job we will create is a test . This would be used to check if our theme has any errors or is basically not working on the latest ghost version. This will prevent a theme to be deployed on the server and crashing our website.

The main steps are: checkout the main branch on the repo, spin-up a node server, install and run gscan against our code. Here it is important to run gscan with the --fatal and --verbose flags as we only want to abort if fatal errors occur.

If the test succeed the Action will continue to the deploy job:

Here we will again checkout the main branch and push it into our Ghost server with the API Key and URL we defined in the repo secrets.

A complete example of the Action file could also be found within my Ghost Starter Template on Github.

As we have setup a Github Action with a connection to your Ghost server we could now start developing our theme and using this CI (Continuous Integration) process. Just remember every time you change your theme you should update the version number in the package.json file of your theme.

techbits.io

techbits.io

Deploy ghost themes with github actions.

The workflow for deploying theme changes to a Ghost site can seem a bit convoluted at first glace, especially to those who are used to directly editing theme files on a WordPress installation.

Ghost requires a .zip file to be uploaded through the admin interface. What happens if you edit the files in the theme directory? Nothing...until you restart Ghost.

Instead of picking one of these, there's a much more powerful third option: deploy using Github actions.

What is a Github Action?

At the simplest level, a Github Action is a workflow that performs a job once an event is detected.

Github provides VMs & containers to run scripts/jobs when your event is detected.

Creating an action would be a whole project in itself, but fortunately, the Ghost team maintain such an action which utilises the Ghost API functionality built into your site.

Not only will it deploy your theme, but it will check it for errors, even giving you a bit of a clue where to look to fix the issue.

Creating the Ghost Integration

Login to your Ghost admin dashboard, go to Settings, then choose Integraions under Advanced. Choose + Add Custom Integration and give it a descriptive name.

Either keep this page open, or make a note of the Admin API key and URL.

Setting up the Repository

ghost github actions

Create a Repository

  • Log into your Github account and create a new repository. Make sure you set it to Private unless you have a very good reason for not doing so.
  • The name of the repository doesn't matter - it's just so we can identify it.
  • Creating a readme file can be useful if you want to keep a note of site settings (especially header/footer code injection).
  • As it's a private repo, we're not going to add our own license.

Add the Action Secrets

Once you've created the repository, go into the settings of that repo. Under Secrets -> Actions, choose 'New repository secret'

ghost github actions

Create two secrets here. The names can be whatever you want, but the Ghost documentation suggests: GHOST_ADMIN_API_URL  & GHOST_ADMIN_API_KEY . Use the API URL and API Admin key gathered from Ghost as the secret for these.

Create the Deploy File

In the root of your repository, create a folder called .github (the . is very important), and within that, create a folder called workflows . Within that, create a .yml file (Ghost docs suggests deploy-theme.yml ).

If you're using the Github website, in your repository click Add File -> Create new file, and for the name of the file you can enter .github/workflows/deploy-theme.yml to automatically create both directories.

For the contents of the file, you can use the following, but I'd also recommend checking for the latest version number on the Github Marketplace and replace 1.6.1 below as applicable.

Replace the branch name if yours differs from main (but if it's a new repository, it shouldn't do).

If you deviated from GHOST_ADMIN_API_URL  & GHOST_ADMIN_API_KEY secret names, ensure you make the same changes here too.

If you're using the web editor, hit 'Commit new file'. Otherwise, save and push it.

As soon as you've done this, within your repo, go to Actions and you'll be able to watch the first run...fail...

ghost github actions

This is expected! We haven't uploaded the theme yet, so it's probably a good thing it failed.

Commit the Theme Directory

While editing files using the Github web interface can be handy when you're without your usual setup, committing changes to Github is best done using one of many git-based tools, after you've worked on them with your favourite code editor.

If you're not familiar with this, Github Desktop is probably the best place to start. Once you've logged in, clone your repository from Github to your computer, copy your theme directory into that folder, and you should see lots of files listed back in Github Desktop, showing all of the files to be added. Add a commit message, and hit Commit, then hit push.

Now go back to Github.com, into your repo actions again, and if all has gone well, you should see a success message.

ghost github actions

Activate the Theme

If you had already uploaded this theme (and the directory name matches that in your Github repo), your theme should already be active, and any future changes should be reflected on your Ghost site almost as soon as you commit them.

If not, the last step is to go back to your Ghost admin section, into Design -> 'Change theme' (bottom-left of the window), then the 'Advanced' drop-down in the top-right. Choose ACTIVATE on the applicable theme.

Final Thoughts

Once you have this in place, you might surmise that you don't want every change to be pushed live to your main site. In that case, you could create a new branch in the repository, and add API secrets for a staging site. Once you create a second deploy file (e.g. deploy-staging.yml ) in the workflows directory, and set the branch in that file to staging , you'll have a mechanism to test your changes, and once you've approved your own work, merge changes from staging into main to push those changes to the main site.

Using multiple branches in this way reinforces a good development habit, and while you could roll changes back to a previous commit, it's preferable to not need to in the first place!

If you're deploying any other changes to Ghost (theme, or otherwise) using Github actions, let me know in the comments, or @techbitsio .

Adding a members-only contact form with Ghost

Ghost: redirect www. to fix seo issues, speed up your ghost site with varnish cache and webhooks.

GitHub Actions

Table of contents, basic example, advanced networking example, prerequisites.

It is generally recommended to set up your test execution parameters as GitHub secrets , which can then be used environment variables in your actions. The examples below will be using the GitHub secrets syntax ( ${{ secrets.[SECRET_NAME] }} ) for sensitive information like the following:

  • GI_API_KEY - available in your Ghost Inspector account .
  • GI_SUITE or GI_TEST - the ID of the Ghost Inspector suite/test you wish to run against your app.

The examples below start at the jobs portion of a GitHub Action workflow. If this is your first action, be sure to include something like the following at the top of your workflow:

Read more about Configuring a workflow in the official GitHub Help.

If your GitHub action deploys to a publicly available URL, the simplest way to integrate Ghost Inspector is with our CLI Docker image .

Here is another example of using a different Action to get the Netlify Deploy Preview URL . However any URL can be used for `startUrl`, or even omitted entirely if your tests already have a fixed URL.

The Ghost Inspector CLI image can also be used to test your Docker application without the need to modify your existing container(s). The following example will build and start the application under test in the background, and then utilize our ghostinspector/cli image to create a temporary VPN tunnel (using ngrok ) to your Docker app and execute your suite against it:

Screen Rant

Casting the live-action ghost of tsushima movie: 8 actors perfect for jin.

Chad Stahelski is set to direct the video game adaptation Ghost of Tsushima, but which actors would be perfect to play lead character Jin?

  • Daisuke Tsuji, who voiced Jin in the game, is the clear casting choice for the Ghost of Tsushima movie due to his understanding of the character and emotional performance.
  • Andrew Koji, star of martial arts series Warrior, is another strong contender for the role, bringing experience with action sequences and a desire to put his own spin on the character.
  • Show Kasamatsu, known for his standout work in Tokyo Vice, is a lesser-known but promising choice for Jin, with the right charisma, looks, and acting chops to deliver a compelling portrayal.

When it comes to casting Jin for the live-action Ghost of Tsushima movie, there are plenty of actors who could do a great job. While it was once almost a given that a live-action adaptation of a video game would suck, the last decade or so has seen the genre turn around. HBO's The Last of Us series received critical acclaim, while the likes of Werewolves Within or the Sonic the Hedgehog movies earned solid reviews. One game that feels almost custom-made for the big screen is Sony's Ghost of Tsushima from 2020.

Ghosts of Tsushima's story follows Jin Sakai, a samurai who is forced to abandon his strict codes to defend the titular island . The game has an emotional storyline, incredible visuals and some great characters and combat. It was also greeted with rave reviews, and a film version was quickly greenlit. John Wick director Chad Stahelski is currently attached, and it could be his next project after he finishes work on the Henry Cavill Highlander reboot. Of course, a Ghost of Tsushima movie will ultimately live or die based on who plays Jin .

Ghost of Tsushima Movie Gets Best Update Yet From John Wick Director After 2 Years of Development: "Getting Our S—t Together"

8 daisuke tsuji, daisuke played jin in the original game.

For fans of the Ghost of Tsushima game , the clear casting choice is Daisuke Tsuji, who voiced Jin and provided his facial and motion capture . His performance is the reason the character resonated so strongly, as Jin evolved from a samurai with an almost naive view of warfare to one who was willing to do whatever it took to win. The game takes players on a rich, emotional journey with Jin, who learns to abandon tradition and forge his own path.

The advantage of casting Daisuke as Jin is there are no other actors who know the material as well . That's not to say there aren't other performers who couldn't make Jin their own, but in terms of carrying over the elements that made Ghost of Tsushima such a hit, retaining the same character would be an incredible asset. As for Daisuke's thoughts on being cast, he took to Twitter in 2021 to state that regarding Jin's various hot spring sequences:

If I get to play Jin in the live-action Ghost, let it be known that I fully agree to doing butt nudity.

One potential downside - at least from a studio perspective - is that Daisuke Tsuji doesn't have much experience in live-action movies. He's appeared on shows like Invasion , but most of his credits are voice over roles, including Mortal Kombat 1 . If he was to take the role of Jin in the Ghost of Tsushima film, he would likely be put through extensive screen tests and fight training first.

7 Andrew Koji

Koji really wants to play ghost of tsushima's jin.

Andrew Koji is a leading contender for Jin in Ghost of Tsushima - and it's a role he really wants too. Koji is the star of the martial arts series Warrior - which was based on a story treatment by Bruce Lee - and on the big screen, he stole the show as Storm Shadow in the otherwise lackluster Snake Eyes. He played a key role in 2022 action comedy Bullet Train too, which co-starred Brad Pitt and Aaron Taylor-Johnson. The movie was also directed by David Leitch, co-director of the original John Wick, alongside Chad Stahelski.

Where to buy Ghost of Tsushima online

So in short, Koji has experience with action sequences, sword fighting and has worked with a close collaborator of Ghost of Tsushima's potential director. In 2022, Koji revealed to EW that he has played through the game twice, and stated " I think I can do a really good Jin Sakai. I can bring my own spin to it ." He's also in the right age range and is a little more familiar with American audiences thanks to his parts in high-profile English-language productions.

6 Show Kasamatsu

Kasamatsu needs a leading man role.

Maybe one of the more obscure potential choices for Ghost of Tsushima , but Show Kasamatsu is a strong candidate regardless . Kasamatsu has been making a name for himself with shows like Gannibal or the Michael Mann-produced Tokyo Vice . In the latter, he plays a conflicted enforcer for the Yakuza, and in a series that boasts actors like Ken Watanabe and Rinko Kikuchi, he's the most intriguing character.

Ghost of Tsushima Ending & Final Battle Explained

He brings both a steeliness and vulnerability to Sato - which makes him an excellent choice for Jin. Kasamatsu has the looks, the charisma and experience to play Jin, and while he's not exactly a household name yet, the Ghost Of Tsushima brand itself is what will draw audiences to movie theaters anyway.

5 Brian Tee

Tee has a rich variety of roles.

The Japanese-born Brian Tee has appeared in many American blockbusters, most notably playing Shredder in 2016's Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows. He's also appeared in The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift , Jurassic World and played Liu Kang inweb series Mortal Kombat: Legacy . In short, Tee is an actor who has been around and appeared in parts that stretched his action muscles - including underrated Korean thriller No Tears for the Dead - and dramatic muscles too, like his role as Dr Choi in Dick Wolf's Chicago franchise.

Tee is a performer with over 20 years of experience, and could portray a more haunted take on Ghost of Tsushima's Jin . Of the potential candidates on his list, Tee is the oldest, and might be out of the age range producers are thinking about. That said, the film doesn't have to act as a direct translation of the game's story or timeline. It could instead follow an older Jin who must earn redemption for his "failure" to stop the invasion of Tsushmina Island and put its own spin on the character's arc.

4 Sen Mitsuji

Mitsuji is an unconventional but intriguing pick for jin.

Half Australian, half Japanese model Sen Mitsuji has the smallest number of credits of any other performer on this list, but that doesn't have to rule him out of the running. Mitsuji has a very distinctive look, and played major roles in short-lived sci-fi drama Origin , the second season of Altered Carbon and miniseries Brave New World . Mitsuji seems to have stepped away from acting since the latter, which aired in 2020. In his previous roles, Mitsuji displayed a brooding charisma and screen presence, and with extra coaching, could totally be in the running for Stahelski's Ghost of Tsushima .

3 Tatsuya Fujiwara

Fujiwara is the most experienced actor of the bunch.

Another older, unconventional choice to play Jin is Tatsuya Fujiwara , who is most famous for acclaimed cult hit Battle Royale . The star has worked steadily in the aftermath of that 2000's hit, including the sequel Requiem and playing Light in the live-action Death Note films. Fujiwara is about ten years older than Jin is portrayed in Ghost of Tsushima and would likely bring more of an intensity than a younger performer might. That would be an interesting way to approach the role, though, and would finally give Fujiwara a prominent role in a big-budget, Hollywood production.

2 Kento Yamazaki

Yamazaki is the star of netflix's alice in borderland.

A young Japanese star who has amassed a big filmography in a short period, Kento Yamazaki has starred in everything from Takashi Miike's JoJo's Bizarre Adventure: Diamond Is Unbreakable Chapter I to a TV adaptation of Death Note and popular Netflix show Alice in Borderland. Yamazaki comes with a well-rounded range of credits, including wacky comedy, drama and action. Jin goes through a full transformation in Ghost of Tsushima's story, and Yamazaki is the kind of rising star with the experience to add meat to the character's bones.

Mackenyu's acting background is perfect for Ghost Of Tsushima

Mackenyu is another strong pick for Ghost of Tsushima's Jin and won hearts playing swordsman Zoro in Netflix's One Piece . Mackenyu is the son of movie icon Sonny Chiba ( Kill Bill: Volume 1 ) and has previously made an impression with projects like Rurouni Kenshin: The Final , Tokyo Ghoul: 'S' and Pacific Rim: Uprising . Despite his age, he's racked up an impressive number of credits across both Japanese and American productions, with the live-action One Piece winning him a new batch of fans.

He has the experience with action to take on the physical challenge of a Ghost of Tsushima movie, but he hasn't had a role with the dramatic requirements. Many of Mackenyu's past credits have traded on his good looks and charm but rarely challenged him as a dramatic actor. Jin could be the role that lets Mackenyu sell his range to audiences , however, and being a little younger than his other rivals for the film could underline the transformation Jin goes through.

Source: Daisuke Tsuji/ Twitter , EW

Ghost of Tsushima

IMAGES

  1. How to Deploy Ghost Themes Using GitHub Actions

    ghost github actions

  2. Deploying a Ghost theme with GitHub actions

    ghost github actions

  3. Deploy Ghost Themes with Github Actions

    ghost github actions

  4. How to Deploy Your Ghost Theme Using GitHub Actions

    ghost github actions

  5. How to Deploy Ghost Themes Using GitHub Actions

    ghost github actions

  6. Deploying a Ghost theme with GitHub actions

    ghost github actions

VIDEO

  1. Ghost of Tsushima #098

  2. REAL ghost caught on video tape!

  3. Ghost of Tsushima Three Actions Three Illusions

  4. exploiting android using GHOST FRAMEWORK

  5. Ghost from a magic picture! Part 1 #shorts

  6. Ghost Hands#Kritikachannel#Shorts#funny#viral

COMMENTS

  1. Official Ghost + GitHub Integration

    In Ghost Admin, navigate to Integrations and create a new custom integration called GitHub Actions: Set your Ghost integration credentials in GitHub Next, copy and paste your integration details into your GitHub repository's secrets. You can find these under Settings → Secrets and variables → Actions.

  2. Deploy Ghost Theme · Actions · GitHub Marketplace · GitHub

    This GitHub action allows you to automatically build and deploy your Ghost Theme from GitHub to any Ghost install, via the Ghost Admin API! Getting Started 💡 This action expects that you already have a working Ghost install running at least v2.25.5.

  3. Using Ghost with GitHub: The Complete Step-by-Step Guide

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  5. Ghost Blog on GitHub Pages using GitHub Actions

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  6. GitHub Actions documentation

    Start here Learn GitHub Actions Whether you are new to GitHub Actions or interested in learning all they have to offer, this guide will help you use GitHub Actions to accelerate your application development workflows. Examples Example workflows that demonstrate the CI/CD features of GitHub Actions. About continuous integration

  7. How to set up Ghost CMS with a custom theme via GitHub Actions

    How to connect your local Ghost instance with the production site via GitHub actions to automatically push theme changes from local to production. My setup with Ghost 👻 Hosting The Ghost CMS is set up on a Digital Ocean droplet, which comes preconfigured with everything you need.

  8. Ghost Publish Action · Actions · GitHub Marketplace · GitHub

    A GitHub Action to publish markdown files from a commit to Ghost as a post draft. Warning: This software is work in progress and might break your website or kill the internet. Use at your own risk. Working This action expects 1 markdown file in a commit.

  9. How to Deploy Your Ghost Theme Using GitHub Actions

    So, the purpose of the GitHub action is to take the theme from the GitHub repo and send it to your website. I assume you are familiar with using Git and GitHub, and your theme is already on GitHub. Create a Custom Ghost Integration. The first step is creating a new Custom Integration in Ghost Admin → Integrations.

  10. Ghost blog automated theme deployment with Github Actions

    Step 2 - Modify your theme in your editor It's up to you to use your favourite editor, in my case Visual Studio Code. Clone your fork locally, then you can implement the changes you need. Don't commit and push yet as we need to set up the automated deployment first. Step 3 - Github Action setup

  11. Features • GitHub Actions · GitHub

    A collection of GitHub Actions for Google Cloud Platform Integrate your Glo boards into your code workflow Improve your code review workflow and quality Included, hosted runner minutes are consumed at different rates for each operating system. GitHub Actions is not available for private repos in legacy per-repository plans.

  12. GitHub

    Actions Security Insights Use this GitHub Action with your project Add this Action to an existing workflow or create a new one. View on Marketplace main 3 branches 16 tags 317 commits .github/ workflows Update actions/checkout action to v4 3 months ago dist Update vars to accomodate working directory 4 months ago .editorconfig Initial commit

  13. How to Deploy Your Ghost Theme with GitHub Actions

    The Deploy Ghost Theme GitHub action is a great tool to improve the usual workflow when it comes to updating Ghost Themes. The most common way before was changing the theme files locally, then uploading the zip manually using the Ghost Admin. But this tool is a much better way of doing theme deployment.

  14. Ghost Tips & Tricks #3 / Deploy Your Ghost Theme Using Github Actions

    On the GitHub theme repository, navigate to Settings > Actions to check the theme deployment actions list. You can click any action and see more details about it. That's it for today and I hope you find this useful… Checkout previous parts of the Ghost Tips & Tricks series:

  15. Deploying a Ghost theme with GitHub actions

    A few months ago, the Ghost team came up with action-deploy-theme, an GitHub action to deploy a theme to a Ghost website automatically, right from GitHub! I have been enjoying it for a while now, so let me share how it works. This will work with any Ghost theme. The first step is to push it to a GitHub repo. It doesn't matter if it's public ...

  16. Understanding GitHub Actions

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