W.D. Schock

  • In the News
  • Parts & Service

Lido 14 Sailboat, a W.D. Schock Exclusive

Lido 14, a local legend, lido 14 is great for beginning, intermediate or sailing clubs.

Lido 14 Regatta

Young, old, new or veteran, the Lido 14 has possessed the ability to maintain its status as one of the classic small dinghies in the United States.  Competitive fleets on the West Coast keep racing alive; while countless others are cruised on lakes, rivers and ponds across the Midwest.  Easily set up and easily sailed, the Lido 14 offers accessible sailing to many ability levels and age groups all over the country.

  By Airwaves writer Tyler Colvin   

lido class sailboat

 The Lido 14 sailboat is a family oriented day-sailer that seats as many as 6 yet remains sporty enough to be interesting to race.  

                       YES! we still build our loved Lido 14! 

                        Call us for a quote 951-277-3377

About Lido 14

Specifications.

Lido 14 Sailboat

Length Overall 14 Feet

Beam 6 Feet

Draft - Centerboard Raised 5 Inches

Draft - Centerboard Lowered 4 Feet 3 Inches

Sail Area - Main 76 Square Feet

Sail Area - Jib 35 Square Feet

Spar Material Aluminum 

Hull Construction Hand Laid Fiberglass

 Weight (Fully Rigged) 310 Pounds

Seating Area 4+ Adults

  The Lido 14 Sailboat

The Lido 14 sailboat is exclusively manufactured by W.D. Schock Corp. 

Lido 14 history begins with Barney Lehman, boat builder and designer. Barney, best known for his Lehman series of dinghies, had been in development of a 14 foot version of his successful Lehman 10 when he sold his business to W.D. "Bill" Schock. Bill, a successful small boat builder, completed the work that Barney had started by creating a fractional sloop rig, increasing the boat's beam for stability, adding internal seat tanks for comfort and buoyancy, and providing a foredeck and a deck stepped rig rather than the Lehman's traditional keel stepping.

The year was 1958 and the location was Newport Beach, California. Newport Beach is one of the sailing centers of the nation, due primarily to the mild weather and the extensive sailing environs of Newport Bay. The bay, naturally created by the void between coastal bluff and a peninsula running along the Pacific Coast, was originally nothing more than sandbars and silt from estuaries. Dredging and development led to a navigable harbor containing eight islands, thirteen yacht clubs and boating associations, thousands of "cottages" large and small, nearly an equal number of boats, and 26 miles of shoreline. It is an ideal location for family sailing and served as the impetus to build a simple, fun, and comfortable sailing dinghy.

What followed is nothing short of spectacular. Within three short years, almost 1000 boats had been built. By 1970, with the total approaching 3000. Of these, a very large percentage involved in competitive racing around the nation. It was common for relatively minor regattas to have 60 or more boat and major regattas having limits of 100. As with all one-design boats of the era, the popularity of the Lido 14 peaked in the mid-70's. By 1980, the total number of boats constructed had risen to nearly 5000 but the number of new boats was quickly decreasing. A testament to the quality of the construction is that boats built in 1960 are still actively racing and will continue to sail many years to come given a little maintenance and loving care. Perhaps to the chagrin of W.D. Schock Corp., the availability of quality used boats sustains the popularity of the Lido 14, providing an unmatched entry into the wonderful world of small boat sailing! Reference: Lido14.0rg

Interest in getting involved in a Lido 14 sailing group?

Lido 14 Class Association 

Lido 14 Organization 

We would love to add your organization to our list of Lido 14 sailboats. Please contact us at:

[email protected]  

Parts for Lido 14

The beloved Lido 14 sailboat has been in the boating world since since 1958. If your Lido is in need of parts or repairs, please give us a call at 951-277-3377.

Copyright © 2024 WD Schock - All Rights Reserved.

Powered by GoDaddy

Lido 14 Class Association

Class contact information.

Click below

Class Email

Class Website

One-Design Class Type: Dinghy

Was this boat built to be sailed by youth or adults? Both

Approximately how many class members do you have? 150

Join/Renew Your Class Membership – Click here

Photo Credit:Photo by John Papadopoulos

lido class sailboat

Photo Credit:

Photo Credit: Photo by John Papadopoulos

lido class sailboat

About Lido 14 Class Association

The Lido 14 Class has been racing since 1958 with active racing fleets in California, Oregon, Washington, and Ohio. The boat is ideal for a wide range of interests – from novice racers to professional racing teams because of it’s simplicity, cost, and comfort.

Boats Produced: 6400

Class boat builder(s):

All Lido 14s were built by W.D. Schock Corporation. Production of the boat ceased in the 2010s.

Approximately how many boats are in the USA/North America? 6400

Where is your One-Design class typically sailed in the USA? List regions of the country:

California, Oregon, Washington, and Ohio.

Does this class have a spinnaker or gennaker? No

How many people sail as a crew including the helm?  1

Ideal combined weight of range of crew:  300 pounds total

Boat Designed in  1958

Length (feet/inches): 14′

Beam: 6′

Weight of rigged boat without sails: 310

Draft: ~52″

Mast Height: 18’3″

Back to One-Design Central

Copyright ©2018-2024 United States Sailing Association. All rights reserved. US Sailing is a 501(c)3 organization. Website designed & developed by Design Principles, Inc. -->

Great choice! Your favorites are temporarily saved for this session. Sign in to save them permanently, access them on any device, and receive relevant alerts.

  • Sailboat Guide

Lido 14 is a 14 ′ 0 ″ / 4.3 m monohull sailboat designed by Barney Lehman/W.D. Schock and built by Schock W.D. starting in 1958.

Drawing of Lido 14

Rig and Sails

Auxilary power, accomodations, calculations.

The theoretical maximum speed that a displacement hull can move efficiently through the water is determined by it's waterline length and displacement. It may be unable to reach this speed if the boat is underpowered or heavily loaded, though it may exceed this speed given enough power. Read more.

Classic hull speed formula:

Hull Speed = 1.34 x √LWL

Max Speed/Length ratio = 8.26 ÷ Displacement/Length ratio .311 Hull Speed = Max Speed/Length ratio x √LWL

Sail Area / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the power of the sails relative to the weight of the boat. The higher the number, the higher the performance, but the harder the boat will be to handle. This ratio is a "non-dimensional" value that facilitates comparisons between boats of different types and sizes. Read more.

SA/D = SA ÷ (D ÷ 64) 2/3

  • SA : Sail area in square feet, derived by adding the mainsail area to 100% of the foretriangle area (the lateral area above the deck between the mast and the forestay).
  • D : Displacement in pounds.

Ballast / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the stability of a boat's hull that suggests how well a monohull will stand up to its sails. The ballast displacement ratio indicates how much of the weight of a boat is placed for maximum stability against capsizing and is an indicator of stiffness and resistance to capsize.

Ballast / Displacement * 100

Displacement / Length Ratio

A measure of the weight of the boat relative to it's length at the waterline. The higher a boat’s D/L ratio, the more easily it will carry a load and the more comfortable its motion will be. The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more.

D/L = (D ÷ 2240) ÷ (0.01 x LWL)³

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds.
  • LWL: Waterline length in feet

Comfort Ratio

This ratio assess how quickly and abruptly a boat’s hull reacts to waves in a significant seaway, these being the elements of a boat’s motion most likely to cause seasickness. Read more.

Comfort ratio = D ÷ (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x Beam 1.33 )

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds
  • LOA: Length overall in feet
  • Beam: Width of boat at the widest point in feet

Capsize Screening Formula

This formula attempts to indicate whether a given boat might be too wide and light to readily right itself after being overturned in extreme conditions. Read more.

CSV = Beam ÷ ³√(D / 64)

In 1995, W.D. Schock re-introduced the LIDO 14 “with a modern two piece mold that greatly reduced the complexity and cost of construction while simultaneously improving upon the safety, comfort, and longevity of the design”.

Embed this page on your own website by copying and pasting this code.

  • About Sailboat Guide

©2024 Sea Time Tech, LLC

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Updates! Rigging Gallery, Lido 14 Preservation, Classified Section, CCR Trophies!

  • About the Lido 14

Lido 14 History

  • Resources, Tips, Tuning
  • Chief Measurer Corner
  • Rigging Gallery
  • NEW! Lido 14 Preservation
  • Buy Lido Swag
  • NEW! Classified
  • Approved Changes/Notices
  • Join Class Association
  • Find a Fleet
  • Governing Board
  • Board Meeting Activity
  • 5 ?s for Top Sailors
  • Previous Class Presidents
  • Fleet Captains
  • Race Results & Reports
  • Lido Hall of Fame
  • NEW CCR Trophies
  • NEW CCR Individual Winner

LIDO 14 HISTORY

Lido 14 history begins with Barney Lehman, boat builder and designer. Barney, best known for his Lehman series of dinghies, had been in development of a 14-foot version of his successful Lehman 10 when he sold his business to W.D. “Bill” Schock. 

Bill, a successful small boat builder, completed the work that Barney had started by creating a fractional sloop rig, increasing the boat’s beam for stability, adding internal seat tanks for comfort and buoyancy, and providing a foredeck and a deck stepped rig rather than the Lehman’s traditional keel stepping.

What followed is nothing short of spectacular. Within three short years, almost 1000 boats had been built. By 1970 the total approached 3000. Of these, a very large percentage were involved in competitive racing around the nation. It was common for relatively minor regattas to have 60 or more boats and major regattas having limits of 100. 

As with all one-design boats of the era, the popularity of the Lido 14 peaked in the mid-70′s. By 1980, the total number of boats constructed had risen to nearly 5000 but the number of new boats was quickly decreasing. A testament to the quality of the construction is that boats built in 1960 are still actively racing and will continue to sail many years to come, given a little maintenance and loving care. Perhaps to the chagrin of W.D. Schock Corp., the availability of quality used boats sustains the popularity of the Lido 14, providing an unmatched entry into the wonderful world of small boat sailing.

By 1995, with more than 5000 boats built, the venerable Lido was almost 40 years old. It was then that Lido 14 Association members formed a committee to create a modern version of the ‘old’ Lido to be called the ‘new’ Lido, a version that would be much less expensive to build yet remain competitive with the old boat. The tremendous effort of W.D. Schock Corp. to revitalize the Lido 14 for the 1990′s and beyond led to a reintroduced Lido 14 with a modern two-piece mold design that greatly reduced the complexity and cost of construction while simultaneously improving upon the safety, comfort, and longevity of the design. The “new” Lido 14 was showcased to the nation in the running of the 1996 U.S. Sailing Championship of Champions held in Newport Beach.

The Lido-14 continues to be the chosen boat for those wanting to enjoy sailboat racing at any level: from beginning novices to world and national class competitors. For beginners with their families and friends it is a very simple, safe and affordable entry into the world of sailboat racing with generous guidance from the fleet’s experienced members. For experienced racers there is the knowledge that this is a ‘tactical’ boat and that they can expect to find the most challenging tacticians competing on the race course.

LIDO BOAT #S BY YEAR

Copyright © 2022 www.lido14class.com - All Rights Reserved.

Powered by GoDaddy Website Builder

Browse by Category

  • Coach of the Year
  • High School Sailing Team of the Year
  • Optimist Sailor of the Year
  • Sailing Fitness
  • Regatta News/Results
  • Boat Speed/Tuning/Sailtrim Articles
  • General Sailing News
  • Coaches Locker Room
  • From the Experts
  • Profiles in Pro Sailing
  • Featured Jobs
  • Marketplace Ads
  • Skip to primary navigation
  • Skip to main content
  • Skip to primary sidebar
  • Skip to footer

Sail1Design

First Name*

Email Address*

June 12, 2013 by Sail1Design Editor 2 Comments

Reader Interactions

' src=

April 24, 2019 at 15:23

I just need to know if it will be easy for one person to put a Lido 14 on top of my Honda Odyseey?

I want to travel & have a light sailboat to sail in?

' src=

August 3, 2019 at 20:48

Not a chance. 2 strong people possibly, it’s over 300 lbs, with a 6-foot beam. Trailer it.

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

By submitting this form, you accept the Mollom privacy policy .

lido class sailboat

One Design Classes

Browse the airwaves.

  • Sailing News Articles
  • High School & College News Articles
  • One-Design Class Profiles
  • Tactics & Strategy
  • Sailing & Education
  • ICSA Rankings
  • Sailing/Yacht Club Profiles
  • Youth Sailor of the Year
  • Sail1Design Annual Awards

Helpful Links

  • Join the S1D Team
  • Accessibility Help
  • Privacy Policy
  • Entries feed
  • Comments feed
  • WordPress.org

lido class sailboat

  • INTERNATIONAL SITE
  • REQUEST A QUOTE
  • Warranty Policy
  • Have you worked with Ullman Sails before? -- Yes No
  • If yes, which Location

Contact Information

  • Name * First Last
  • Address Street Address Address Line 2 City State / Province / Region ZIP / Postal Code Afghanistan Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cabo Verde Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czechia Côte d'Ivoire Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Eswatini Ethiopia Falkland Islands Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People's Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Micronesia Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island North Macedonia Northern Mariana Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Palestine, State of Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Réunion Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Sweden Switzerland Syria Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, the United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Türkiye US Minor Outlying Islands Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela Viet Nam Virgin Islands, British Virgin Islands, U.S. Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Åland Islands Country

Sail Information

  • One Design Class/Yacht Manufacturer
  • Yacht Model
  • Boat Location
  • Luff Length
  • Leech Length
  • Foot Length
  • LP Measurement
  • Sail Use Cruising Racing Racing and Cruising
  • Preferred Contact Method Phone Email
  • Insert Comments here
  • I require an Ullman Sails measurer to confirm the sail measurements
  • *Note: If you do not wish for a measurer to come out, you immediately indemnify Ullman Sails against any mis-measurements that you provide to us
  • Consent I agree to the Ullman Sails Terms of Service
  • I would like to Subscribe to the Ullman Sails Newsletter

lido class sailboat

  • Carbon 3D Membrane
  • Dacron Crosscut
  • Hydranet Radial
  • Specialized
  • Sail Repairs
  • Coronado 15
  • Flying Tiger 10M
  • Esprit de Corps
  • Sapphire Knight

THE LANDING: BLOG

Lido 14 class championships.

lido class sailboat

Ullman Sails One Design Coordinators Past and Present go 1,2 at Lido Class Championships

August 20-22, 2021

50 Lido teams showed up at Mission Bay Yacht Club for what was the largest Class Championship in a very long time with 50 boats competing for the Championship.  No surprise given the awesome venue and all the work the class officers put in to promote and pull off the event.  After qualification racing Friday the class was split into a 25 boat gold flight and a 25 boat silver flight.  Erik Shampain (long time Ullman One Design Coordinator from a few years back) handily won the qualification day with a string of three bullets.  Scores from the day are only used to split the fleets, then the gold and silver divisions showed up to a fresh start Saturday.

lido class sailboat

Erik and crew Bobbie Sterbins winning the pin end in a qualifying race

The first day of racing saw Erik continue his form winning 2 of 5 races to lead the event at the end of the day.  He was followed closely by Stu Robertson who also won two races on the day.  USNB’s current One Design Coordinator Greg Dair ended the day in 3rd a few points back with a consistent scoreline.  Then there was a big gap to Chris Raab in 4th who had two deep races one attributed to a course mix up.  The points made it pretty clear that there were only 3 people with a good shot at winning the event after day one.

lido class sailboat

Greg Dair and Nick McCabe chase Jeff Lenhart, our long time hand cut One Design Sailmaking expert, around a mark in qualifying.

The first race on day two (race 6) went Greg’s way with a second while Erik notched in his throwout and Stu also had a deep race.  Things tightened up quite a bit after that one.  Then Stu took the win in the next race (7) with Erik taking a 5th and Greg 7th.  Greg’s day one consistency paid off as he was able to throwout the seven and keep a 2,2,1 in the days other races. Erik then won the next race (8) to keep his slim lead going into the final race.  On the final race (9) Greg took his first race win to Erik’s 4th, it was just enough as it put him in the lead by 1 point, when he would’ve came off a tie break second best.

Kathy and Butch, class presidents, asked Greg to write up a few insights as to how they pulled it off.

Greg’s takeaways;

  • A “don’t lose the regatta yet” approach in decision making, taking the conservative option in all high risk scenarios and setting up for clean lanes and open water that made it easy to avoid high risk scenarios in the first place.  We were almost a little bit too conservative overall, it might have been better to hit the gas (take more risk) a little harder earlier.
  • Consistency and repeatability in strategy when race course conditions were similar, if you have a successful strategy and the race course stays the same there’s no need to change.  Keep things simple and improve the execution.

lido class sailboat

Greg and crew Nick McCabe in 4794 with a healthy gap to leeward.

  • The first two points led to a starting strategy that saw us consistently starting too leeward of the boat end pack.  Boat end starts were strong but high risk.  Starting just to leeward of the group allowed us to have great starts in every single race and set us up for an incident free event.  In the final race we were down a few points and needed to up the risk factor, it was the one time we set up to win the boat end, which we pulled off successfully.  That set us up for the win in the final race.
  • 80% of the time it was easy to tell what tack was favored, it was the 20% of the time where it was difficult to know that was critical.  In those times prioritize that you’re heading to the next pressure filling in down the course, set yourself up in a healthy lane (don’t be scared to tack for a better one), focus on your boatspeed and be ready to react well to the next shift whether it’s what you wanted or not (this is especially hard to do when it’s not what you wanted).  When in doubt on pressure and lanes, head to the side that seems big picture favored, was often left in the lighter times and right with the pressure, but keep geographical factors in mind.
  • Watch for getting lifted too leeward of the fleet on port heading into the right corner, just before the righty header to tack out on.  It’s not always there but its a big gain when it works.
  • Also we had a lot of tell tales

This was a very cool event for the Ullman Sails team.  It was great to have Erik checking back in with us for sails before the event.  He was quite involved in the process as we discussed small tweaks and changes.  We definitely made some improvements.  It was also cool to see Jeff Lenhart down competing after cutting everyone’s sails.  The loft was happy to see it’s sailmakers show up and prove that were still the brand of choice for anyone looking for the fastest Lido sails on the water.

For information on sails or any general Lido information don’t hesitate to call,

Ullman Sails One Design Coordinator

310 683 9618

[email protected]

  • 949.645.9412
  • [email protected]
  • Marine Gear Sale & Boat Auction
  • OCC Professional Mariner Newsletter

Learn to sail and powerboat at OCC | USSailing | USPowerboating | Adults and Kids

Learn to Sail

There are many ways to learn to sail. You can buy a small sailboat and learn on your own, or sail with a friend and try to learn from experience, but taking a formal sailing class will save you time and money in the long run.

Let us help you learn the right way with trained instructors, great equipment and a first class facility on beautiful Newport Harbor.

Explore sailing in our Lido 1 or Harbor 20 Level 1 Beginning Sailing classes and move on to build your skills and confidence in more advanced classes.

It’s easy to get started.  You decide which boat type, class price and class size is best for you.  Whether you start in the Lido 14 dinghy or the Harbor 20 keelboat you are on the path to a lifetime of sailing adventures.

lido class sailboat

  • Beginning Sailing – Lido 1
  • Intermediate Lido – Lido 2

Harbor 20 – Level 1

Harbor 20 – level 2.

  • Harbor 20 Level 2- Extra

Lido Fun Sail

Lido racing clinic, private lessons, beginning sailing – lido 1.

Beginning Sailing

If you have never sailed before or just have a little experience sailing with others, this is the class for you. You will learn basic sailing skills and gain confidence through dockside lectures and hands-on experience in Lido 14 dinghies. Dinghy sailing is a physical activity and participants should have physical stamina, good balance and be capable of moving about safely in the boat. Topics will include sailing theory, points of sail, basic terminology, tacking, gybing, safety, knots and docking. Eighty percent of class time is spent enjoying the outdoors and sailing the Lidos within Newport Bay. Two  students per boat. Students must be 14 years old to participate in this class.  Min 8 – Max 24 students.

  • Ability to swim 50 yards
  • At least 14-years old on the first day of class.
  • Sails in the Sun
  • Intermediate Lido

Register online >

Intermediate Lido – Lido 2

Intermediate Lido

Now that you know basic sailing concepts Intermediate Lido (Lido 2) will take your sailing skills to the next level with a focus on improving your boat-handling skills as both skipper and crew, refining sail trim and problem solving afloat. You will spend most of your class time on the water practicing and building new skills, and the importance of balance and teamwork will become evident as you learn to sail faster and smarter with greater confidence. Single-handed sailing will be introduced time and weather permitting. Upon successful completion of Intermediate Lido, you will be ready to move on to Harbor 20 Level 2 or Shields 1.

  • Successful completion of Beginning Sailing (Lido 1) or recent equivalent dinghy sailing experience. Participants must be at least 14 years old and able to swim 50 yards.
  •   Harbor 20 Level 2

Register online >  

Harbor 20

Harbor 20 Level 1 is one of two entry-level sailing classes we offer. The other option for beginners is our Lido 1 Beginning Sailing Class (see page X?). The novice sailor will learn the fundamentals of sailing on a comfortable and stable Harbor 20 keelboat. With a maximum of three students per class you will enjoy more personalized instruction through a combination of classroom and on-the-water practice. You will learn basic sail theory, terminology, tacking, gybing, crew coordination, points of sail, safety, right of way, knots and docking. Eighty percent of class time is spent sailing the Harbor 20 within Newport Harbor.

  • No prior experience necessary.
  • Participants must be 14 years of age or older and able to swim 50 yards.
  • US Sailing Basic Keelboat
  • Harbor 20 Level 2

Harbor 20 Level 2 builds upon the sailing fundamentals learned in Harbor 20 Level 1 and provides a great transition for students moving from Intermediate Lidos to small keelboats.  You will practice your sailing skills and gain experience and confidence rigging and sailing the Harbor 20.  Topics include docking procedures, crew communication, roller furling operation, points of sail and sail trim, crew overboard, reefing, safety equipment, rules and knots.  If  you are thinking about getting your Harbor 20 Skipper Certification this class is a must?  By the end of class you will be ready to move on to Shields 1, or if your goal is to take friends and family sailing on Newport Bay ask about the Harbor 20 Level 2- Extra class.  Min 4-Max 8 students.

  • Harbor 20 – Level 1, Intermediate Lido or equivalent experience.
  • Harbor 20 Level 2 Extra

Harbor 20 – Level 2–Extra

An intensive course for students interested in renting the Harbor 20 for day sailing.  Class time will be 20% review and 80% evaluation of student skills.   Students in this class have completed Harbor 20 Level 2, or have other significant sailing experience. You will review the fundamentals of rigging and sailing a Harbor 20 , refine your skills at the helm and demonstrate ability to sail proficiently on all points of sail with proper sail trim, confidently leave and return to the dock,  reef successfully and perform a crew overboard recovery.    Active participation is required for success and a passing grade on the written and practical tests are required for certification.

  • Harbor 20 Level 2 or equivalent experience

You asked us for more ways to improve your sailing skills and spend more time on the water – and we heard you!

Join us for a sail on Newport Harbor practicing all the skills you have learned in Beginning Sailing, Intermediate Lido and the Lido Racing Clinic. Our instructor will be on hand for a quick shoreside briefing, collect waivers and provide support during rigging and docking, but this class is your chance to simply go for a sail. After you rig and launch you will head off on a course of your choice exploring the harbor.

  • Beginning Sailing (Lido 1) or equivalent recent dinghy sailing experience. Participants must be at least 14 years old and able to swim 50 yards
  • Book : Instructor handouts

A fun class to further your sailing skills. You will learn how to sail the boat faster and more efficiently using sail trim and crew placement to maximize your boat speed. You will learn about racing tactics and strategies, how to start, round a mark, and the racing rules. Even if you don’t plan to continue to race you will appreciate the enhanced understanding of safe and efficient sailing gained in this class.

Private lessons are available with a certified instructor for all skill levels. A private lesson is a one-on-one experience that works well as a confidence builder, as an introduction to sailing, or to allow focus on improving specific skills, or to make up a missed class. A private lesson with an OCC instructor will take your ability to the next level with individual learning and feedback.

Private lessons are typically taught in 3-hour sessions (except for powerboat instruction), scheduled at a time that is convenient for you, and based on instructor availability.

Rates are based on a 1:1 ratio. A fee applies for additional students.

Member’s receive a 10% discount on published rates.

*Catalina 42: Minimum 2-students, completion of Basic Cruising 1 or equivalent experience. For students with less experience, or for less than 2-students a fee will be charged to add additional crew.

All regular scheduled classes are available on a private or semi-private basis.  Contact the school for pricing and scheduling.

IMAGES

  1. SailboatData.com

    lido class sailboat

  2. Lido 14 Ft Sailboat

    lido class sailboat

  3. Lido 14 Ft Sailboat

    lido class sailboat

  4. Lido 14 sailboat for sale

    lido class sailboat

  5. Lido 14 sailboat for sale

    lido class sailboat

  6. Lido 14 sailboat for sale

    lido class sailboat

VIDEO

  1. Step-By-Step Rigging of a Lido 14 Sailboat

  2. JY1509 A New Toy

  3. Nirvana II RC Sailboat Race

  4. Lido 14 Sanding & Painting Time Lapse (May 2016)

  5. Cutting new Coosa Board TM transom for a Lido 14

  6. Sailing on Pursuit, August 2014

COMMENTS

  1. Lido14Class

    THE LIDO 14. The Lido 14 was designed to be a comfortable day sailor and quickly turned into one of the most popular one-design classes for sailboat racing. It continues to be the chosen boat for those wanting to enjoy sailboat racing at any level. For beginners with their friends and family, it is a very simple and affordable entry into the ...

  2. Lido 14

    The Lido 14 is a recreational sailboat, built predominantly of fiberglass, with wood trim. It has a fractional sloop rig, with gold-colored anodized aluminum spars and a loose-footed mainsail. The hull features a spooned plumb stem, a near-vertical transom, a transom-hung rudder controlled by a tiller and a retractable centerboard that is ...

  3. www.lido14.org

    LIDO14.ORG - This website is dedicated to the Lido 14 sailboat, a family friendly day sailor loved by many Do you have questions about sailing or maintaining the Lido 14? If so, please take a look at the articles in the Lidopedia section and if you still don't find the answers you are looking for, please email [email protected] and we'll see what we can do to help you out.

  4. WD Schock

    Parts for Lido 14. The beloved Lido 14 sailboat has been in the boating world since since 1958. If your Lido is in need of parts or repairs, please give us a call at 951-277-3377. Lido 14 sailboat is a beloved but that W.D.Schock has been building and selling since the 1950's.

  5. Lido 14: A Class of its Own

    The Lido 14 is no exception. Originally built by legendary boat builder Bill Schock, the Lido 14 came to life out of his Newport Beach shop in early 1958. A year later, over 600 hulls had been cast and the one design class, as we know it today, started. There are currently over 6000 hulls with more on the way. The Boat: A Local Legend.

  6. LIDO 14

    Lido 14 Class: Download Boat Record: Notes. In 1995, W.D. Schock re-introduced the LIDO 14 "with a modern two piece mold that greatly reduced the complexity and cost of construction while simultaneously improving upon the safety, comfort, and longevity of the design".

  7. Lido 14 Class Association

    About Lido 14 Class Association. The Lido 14 Class has been racing since 1958 with active racing fleets in California, Oregon, Washington, and Ohio. The boat is ideal for a wide range of interests - from novice racers to professional racing teams because of it's simplicity, cost, and comfort. Design. Boats Produced: 6400. Class boat builder(s):

  8. Lido 14

    Lido 14 is a 14′ 0″ / 4.3 m monohull sailboat designed by Barney Lehman/W.D. Schock and built by Schock W.D. starting in 1958. ... Lido 14 Class # Built 6100 Hull Monohull Dinghy Keel ... W.D. Schock re-introduced the LIDO 14 "with a modern two piece mold that greatly reduced the complexity and cost of construction while simultaneously ...

  9. Lido 14 History

    The Lido-14 continues to be the chosen boat for those wanting to enjoy sailboat racing at any level: from beginning novices to world and national class competitors. For beginners with their families and friends it is a very simple, safe and affordable entry into the world of sailboat racing with generous guidance from the fleet's experienced ...

  10. Lido 14

    The Lido 14 dinghy was designed by W. D. Bill Schock, owner of the Schock Corporation, in 1958 in Newport Beach, CA. Now there are active sailing fleets in CA, WA, TX, LA, OR, UT, and OH. While designed to be a comfortable day sailor, avid Lido sailors quickly took to racing. The Lido 14 Class Association was formed to maintain the strict one ...

  11. Lido 14

    Lido 14. We have a fleet of Lido 14s which we use for the Beginning Sailing and Intermediate Lido classes as well as a youth sailing camps . The first Lido 14 dinghy was built by the W.D. Schock Corporation in 1958 to satisfy the demands of Newport Bay sailors for a fast, fun and relatively stable dinghy. There are now over 5,000 Lidos sailing ...

  12. PDF Double Wave's Guide to The Value of Lido 14s

    1. Meets all the Lido 14 Class Association technical specifications for a Lido 14 2. The boat, when weighed per the Class Association spec, is 310 pounds or less 3. The boat is equipped with racing grade sails with royalty tags 4. The boat has a racing appropriate whisker pole 5. The boat has a mast up top cover that is in reasonably good ...

  13. The Lido 14 Sailboat

    The "new" Lido 14 was showcased to the nation in the running of the 1996 U.S. Sailing Championship of Champions held in Newport Beach (see photo). This event, held in conjunction with U.S. Sailing's annual meeting, brings twenty one-design class champions together in a common boat to crown one sailor the champion of champions.

  14. Lido 14 Class Association

    Lido 14 Class Association, Newport, CA. 918 likes. Family Sailing - Family Fun! The Lido 14 sailboat is easy to sail, easy to trailer and fun to casually day sail or aggressively race.

  15. Lido 14 Class Championships

    Lido 14 Class Championships. Ullman Sails One Design Coordinators Past and Present go 1,2 at Lido Class Championships. August 20-22, 2021. Results. 50 Lido teams showed up at Mission Bay Yacht Club for what was the largest Class Championship in a very long time with 50 boats competing for the Championship. No surprise given the awesome venue ...

  16. Why Join the Lido 14 Class Association

    The Lido Class Association: Signals to all, inside and outside the class, that this one-design sailboat is an active and viable class, ... List of all class members, boat numbers, and fleet membership. 5. Individual fleet listings of officers, members, boats, & addresses.

  17. Beginning Sailing-Lido 1 Classes

    Prerequisite: Participants must be at least 14 years old and able to swim 50 yards. If you have never sailed before or just have a little experience sailing with others, this is the class for you. You will learn basic sailing skills and gain confidence through dockside lectures and hands-on experience in Lido 14 dinghies. Topics will include sailing theory, points of sail, basic terminology ...

  18. Lido 14 Measurement Page

    The Lido 14 Class Association defines a set of measurements and rules to insure that a Lido 14 remains compliant to the one-design standard for the Lido 14 sailboat. The full set of measurements and rules are contained in the text of the Association Bylaws and the Approved Changes list.

  19. Lido 14 Sailing Dinghy

    We have a fleet of Lido 14s which we use for the Beginning Sailing and Intermediate Lido classes as well as a youth sailing camps . The first Lido 14 dinghy was built by the W.D. Schock Corporation in 1958 to satisfy the demands of Newport Bay sailors for a fast, fun and relatively stable dinghy. There are now over 5,000 Lidos sailing ...

  20. Learn to Sail

    Eighty percent of class time is spent enjoying the outdoors and sailing the Lidos within Newport Bay. Two students per boat. Students must be 14 years old to participate in this class. Min 8 - Max 24 students. Prerequisites. Ability to swim 50 yards. At least 14-years old on the first day of class. Book.