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13 Best Small Catamarans For Cruising 2024

The best small catamarans for cruising are affordable and comfortable, making great sailboats for a number of different purposes. If you’re looking for the best small catamarans to start your cruising life then look no further!

When searching for a catamaran for our adventures we scoured the internet for any and all information we could find on just about every size, shape, and model!

Although in the end, we opted for a bigger catamaran, in the hopes of having more family and friends on board, we did heavily research the best small catamarans as an option.

One of the best small catamarans for cruising out at anchor.

Each small catamaran has different pros and cons. As with every sailboat, there will be compromises, but hopefully, this post will help you firm up what you’re really looking for in a multihull and find the right smaller catamaran for you!

Here are what we consider the best small cruising catamarans out there, costing anywhere from $40,000 to $300,000. You can also read up on the average costs of sailboats here.

Why choose a small catamaran for cruising?

The downsides to small multihulls for cruisers

The best small catamarans for ocean sailing

The best small catamarans for coastal cruising

Why Choose A Small Catamaran For Cruising?

a small multihull on an ocean passage, cutting through the water.

The main advantage to choosing a small catamaran for cruising has to be the cost. Not only are smaller sailboats cheaper to buy initially, but they are also cheaper to maintain and to dock in marinas or dry storage.

Why buy a small catamaran over a monohull? This isn’t the post to go into the pros and cons of multihulls vs monohulls, but a few of the main reasons you might prefer to buy a small cat over a bigger, cheaper monohull is the living space and the comfort underway and at anchor.

Living on a sailboat is very different from taking the boat out for a sporty sail every now and again. Having a catamaran over a monohull means you won’t be heeling or rolling at anchor half as much, you can leave out your coffee cup, and you have the space you need to spread out a little.

A small catamaran will enable the more comfortable lifestyle you’re seeking at a more reasonable price tag. So what’s not to love about small cruising multihulls?

The Downsides To Small Multihulls For Cruisers

a sailboat with its sails up, goosewinged.

Of course, just with everything in sailing, there are always compromises to be made when it comes to small multihulls.

One of the biggest downsides for cruisers is the weight issue smaller catamarans present. You won’t be able to carry half as much as you would on a larger catamaran or monohull, which might be a problem if you live onboard full time.

The other negative is that smaller boats usually aren’t quite as seaworthy as larger ones. You might find you’re limited to coastal cruising if you choose a small catamaran, so make sure you have your cruising intentions in mind before you buy.

the sails of a sailboat against the blue sky.

Another big thing to look out for when it comes to choosing the right small cat for you, is the bridge deck clearance. This is often worse on smaller catamarans, and can cause nasty slamming in any sort of sea, both when sailing and at anchor.

With these downsides in mind, we’ve split this post into the best small catamarans for ocean sailing and the best for coastal cruising. Obviously this is a little subjective, as many people have sailed around the world in much smaller and less seaworthy vessels!

The Best Small Catamarans For Ocean Cruising

#1 wharram tiki.

  • Suitable for: Bluewater sailing
  • Fixed Keels
  • Draft (max): 2.08′
  • Engines: Single outboard, though some versions have twin inboards
  • Price: Roughly $100,000

small catamarans sailing with the sunset behind

We have lusted after the Wharram catamarans since our adventures began and would have opted for one of these if we had found one for sale this side of the pond.

Designed by the legendary James Wharram, these small multihulls are pretty unique. They are based on the Polynesian catamaran design, and the plans enable you to self-build these boats if you have the time, money, and space for a project of this magnitude.

If you aren’t keen on taking on a project then you can commission a boat builder to complete the design for you, or buy one second-hand. The advantages of having one made yourself are that you can tweak things to your personal taste, and you can even contact the Wharrams themselves to see if they can adjust the designs for individual requests.

The Wharram catamarans have a lot of charm dues to their traditional design, and the old-fashioned appeal continues inside the boat too. You won’t find the same huge hull space as some of the modern design catamarans now have, but the outside entertainment space is perfect for entertaining.

One of the best small multihulls for ocean cruising

These small catamarans don’t have an inside space across the hulls, so all of your inside living space is below. If you’re used to monohulls then this won’t be a problem but if you like the idea of a galley-up then these boats aren’t for you.

Wharram catamarans, especially the Tiki 38, have great reputations as around the world, bluewater boats. They have fantastic bridge deck clearance so slamming is minimum and they sail well.

Most models have a double cabin and two singles, a galley, a head, and a small salon area below. They are smaller catamarans than many newer 38ft multihulls but this does make them more affordable.

small catamarans in the Caribbean with a beautiful white sand beach behind

A big appeal for us was the fact these boats are designed to be self-made. Although a secondhand model could potentially come with a lot of problems (get a decent survey before you buy!) it does mean that almost everything onboard can be self-fixed. This is a huge bonus if you plan on sailing your small catamaran around the world.

Another thing we loved about these smaller catamarans is the fact they have outboard engines, which we felt would be easier to maintain and replace if necessary. This is a personal choice though so consider this before you get your heart set on one!

One of the downsides to the Tiki 38 is that there aren’t many of them around. These are unique boats and they don’t come on the market frequently. When they do, they tend to be scattered all over the world so you’ll have to be prepared to travel to find one!

#2 Prout Snowgoose 37 : Small Catamaran For Ocean Cruising

a sail on a cruising catamaran and the ocean in the background.

Prout catamarans are a popular choice for cruisers, and you’ll find many owners who have circumnavigated in them. The Snowgoose is no exception. Prout no longer exists as a company, as it was bought by Broadblue in the 90s.

Broadblue still makes catamarans today, and they have very similar features to the original Prouts, though obviously they are far fancier and have all the benefits of a more modern design!

The Snowgoose is a great small multihull to go for as you get quite a lot of space inside and out. We weren’t sure about the berth in the salon area, but it might make a great space for a baby or small child while underway!

The compromise in the Prout Snowgoose is the bridge deck clearance and this was something that put us off these smaller cruising catamarans. A low bridge deck clearance makes the boat slam in waves, both at anchor and underway.

#8 PDQ 36 : A Small Catamaran Without Too Much Slamming

  • Suitable for: Bluewater
  • Draft (max): 2.82′
  • Engines: Twin inboard or outboard
  • Price: Over $100,000

small fast cruising catamaran

These small catamarans have an excellent reputation among cruisers because of their solid build and use of decent materials. They come with either outboard engines for coastal cruising or inboard engines designed to withstand offshore use.

If you like the sound of the PDQ 32 but need a little more room then you’ve got that here! It’s also a boat that people have crossed oceans in, though you might want to consider something more tried and tested like the Prout Snowgoose or the Wharram if you’re planning longer ocean sails.

The boat has three cabins, a galley, salon and head, but there’s a more spacious feel compared to the smaller model. Again, the bridge deck clearance is good so you shouldn’t experience too much slamming.

#9 Lagoon 380 : One Of The Most Popular Small Multihulls

small fast cruising catamaran

  • Fixed keels
  • Engines:  twin diesel engines
  • Price:  from $100,000, used

The Lagoon 380 is one of the most popular catamarans out there, and you’ve probably already spotted a lot of them in your search! This is a great option if modern cats appeal to you, as it’s pretty ‘with the times’ as far as smaller catamarans go!

There are lots of different layouts of this boat available all over the world. Some were built for charter with numerous berths and others were commissioned for couples or families with differing cabin and head options.

This is a proven catamaran from a reputable company, but obviously with so many of these boats out there, they come in a range of conditions. Make sure you get a thorough survey done before purchase!

Lagoon 37 TPI

  • Draft (max): 4′
  • Engines: Twin inboard diesels 
  • Price: Over $100,000 USD 

This is the smallest catamaran built by Lagoon, and unfortunately there aren’t many of them out there. These boats were built mainly for the charter market, and have a smaller rig than some similar sized catamarans.

There are two big queen-size forward doubles port and starboard and a smaller double in the starboard hull aft. The galley and salon are designed to be simple and timeless, with none of the fancy trims you’ll find in the newer Lagoons.

As this boat was intended for charter it probably wouldn’t make a great ocean-going vessel. For starters, it isn’t designed to carry too much in the way of provisions. That’s not to say it won’t be a suitable bluewater boat with a few tweaks. Sailors who have circumnavigated in them have increased sail area and added folding props to get more speed from the vessel.

#11 Catalac 9M/30

small fast cruising catamaran

  • Draft (max): 2.5′
  • Engines:  two outboard engines or one diesel engine
  • Price:  from $50,000

The Catalac 9M is a little different to a lot of the catamarans on this list, as it was built for sailing in the North Sea! This is a great small catamaran for anyone wanting a boat built to be safe!

The bridge deck clearance is reasonable but the boat is light, which can make it more prone to slamming. The unique feature of this small sailboat is the hard dodger, designed as somewhere safe and dry to stand in bad weather.

It sails well, though like a lot of catamarans there is technique involved in getting it to tack smoothly. Once you’ve got the hang of though, this boat will make good speeds for its size.

The Best Small Catamarans For Coastal Cruising

  • Suitable for: Coastal
  • Draft (max): 3.62′
  • Engines: Twin inboard
  • Price: Up to $300,000 for a newer model

The Mahe 36 is the smallest of the Fountaine Pajot range, and these small catamarans can go for a heafty budget if you find a newer model!

This tiny multihull packs a lot into a small space, and because of its modern features, you’ll feel like you’re in a much bigger boat when you step aboard.

This boat is a fast mover, with an ok bridge clearance and some attractive upgrades compared to their last small catamaran design. Most notably the full-length hard top bimini which has the reviewers raving!

If you have the money to splash out on a newer, more expensive small catamaran then this should definitely be on your list to consider! Although they come with a large price tag, these small catamarans are considerably cheaper new than some of the bigger models.

#4 Gemini 105Mc (34ft)

small fast cruising catamaran

Suitable for: Coastal cruising Centreboards Draft (max): 5′ Engines:  Single inboard Price:  from $80,000

The Gemini 105Mc is still in production in the US, which speaks to its popularity. Obviously if you buy new you’ll pay a much higher price! This is one of the smallest catamarans on the list, but it’s still a great option for coastal cruising (or some have even successfully completed ocean passages on them in relative comfort).

For a small multihull this boat sails pretty well and is fast for a coastal cruiser. The living space is decent with good headroom. It has two double cabins and a master bedroom, and the interior finishes are nice too.

A big negative to this boat is the bridge deck clearance which really isn’t amazing, but as we said at the start, there’s always a compromise! This is a sporty-looking little catamaran that’s a good contender for the top smallest catamarans out there!

#5 EndeavourCat 36

Suitable for: Coastal cruising Fixed keels Draft (max): 3′ Engines:  two inboard Price:  from $100

small fast cruising catamaran

Designed and built by Endeavour Catamaran, these American built boats are great cruising catamarans. A big advantage to this little multihull is that it will fit into most monohull slips, so if you anticipate using marinas a lot then this might be the small catamaran for you!

This isn’t a slow boat, and owners report speeds of 8-9 knots. Bear in mind though that the narrow beam does make it less suitable for any offshore passages. It has good interior space with 6′ standing headroom throughout, three double cabins, and a decent-sized galley below. The salon area can seat 6 people comfortably.

This cat is great for single-handed sailors, as all the lines lead to the cockpit and the main and jib are completely self-tacking.

#6 Prout Event 34

small fast cruising catamaran

Suitable for: Coastal/bluewater Fixed keels Draft (max): 2.72′ Engines:  Single inboard Price:  from $30,000

These multihulls are quite hard to find, but if you like the Snowgoose but are on a tighter budget then they might be just what you’re looking for. They share lots of features with the Snowgoose and look very similar, only smaller!

There are three cabins, one head, a salon, and a galley, only they are rather squeezed in compared to the larger model. Personally, we thought there was plenty of space for a smaller sailboat but it’s worth seeing them in person if you’re keen on this model.

They do have the same downsides as the Snowgoose though, with limited headroom and low bridge deck clearance. These boats are known for their slamming!

Coastal Engines:  twin outboards Price:  from $80,000, used

small fast cruising catamaran

The PDQ 32 is a great budget option catamaran and should be cheap(ish) to buy second hand and maintain. With two outboards that are easy to replace on a smaller budget, you’re looking at some of the usual pinch points on a boat becoming a lot more affordable!

This small catamaran only has two cabins, so sleeps less than a lot of the boats on this list, but it is roomier than you’d imagine inside with a decent galley and salon area. It has decent bridge deck clearance so shouldn’t slam too much in any waves.

This isn’t a boat for longer passages as it is a little small (and perhaps underpowered) to face serious weather. If you’re searching for something to potter around in then this is a fun boat to sail and live in!

#12 Dean 365

small fast cruising catamaran

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  • Suitable for: Coastal cruising
  • Draft (max): 3′
  • Engines:  one or two inboard
  • Price:  from $45,000, used

These South African catamarans are great little coastal cruising catamarans that are hard to come by anywhere other than South Africa!

They’re pretty tiny, but have enough space for a galley, 3 or 4 cabins, and 1 or 2 heads. Some of the designs even have a bathtub, which speaks of their liveaboard suitability rather than their sail performance!

These boats are some of the smallest multihulls on this list, so don’t expect much in terms of headroom or bridge deck clearance. That being said, if you’re looking for a tiny catamaran to live on and you are prepared to compromise on sailing ability then these are a solid choice.

We have heard that the build quality can vary somewhat with these multihulls, so make sure you do some solid research and get a good surveyor when buying one of these. If you get a good version then they can make really solid boats.

#13 EndeavourCat 30

the lines of small catamarans tied off to a cleat

Suitable for: Coastal cruising Fixed keels Draft (max): 2.1′ Engines:  single or twin outboard Price:  from $70,000

This is a boat built for comfort over all else, so if you’re looking for a budget catamaran to live in then take a look at the endeavourcat 30. Some people don’t like the boxy design, but we quite liked how it looked in the water. I guess it’s personal taste!

This sailboat has two double cabins, a decent sized galley and salon for the size of the boat, and a head. The bridge deck clearance is low so that’s something to bear in mind before you buy, but the headroom is good (another reason why this would make a good liveaboard catamaran).

Hopefully this has given you some inspiration when searching for small catamarans for cruising, and helped you to find your dream boat!

We’re passionate about helping people live this incredible cruising lifestyle, so if you’re planning your dream liveaboard life make sure you check out our guide on how to run away to sea, with everything you could possibly need to know before, during, and after starting this adventure of a lifetime!

small fast cruising catamaran

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Such small mention of probably the best catamaran for overall cruising, focusing on ease of helming, speed and livability. Simple rig, great ergonomic features, style and definitely a pedigree on the water. The FP Mahe duo! Sea proven. Most delivered on their own bottoms from France. Wide beams and light. Beautiful interior arrangements and easy to maintain. I’m confused about so little mention of probably the best entry level and beyond real cruiser out there.

You forgot the edelcat 35. Great boats, and have circumnavigated!

I wonder why Broadblue 346 is not on the list.

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The Boat Galley

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Small Catamarans

10 Small Catamarans for Cruisers

Published on January 23, 2021 ; last updated on November 7, 2023 by Carolyn Shearlock/Rick Marcarelli

Is a cruising catamaran your dream? Check out these 10 small but sturdy boats you might want to consider.

I hear from many readers interested in small catamarans. Recently, the folks at www.CatamaranSite.com reached out to interview me about our experience cruising on our Gemini 105, Barefoot Gal and we began chatting about the various small catamarans on the market. One thing led to another and I’m pleased that Rick Marcarelli was willing to contribute a guest post sharing information comparing ten of the most popular small catamarans on the market.

When most buyers think of catamarans these days, they think of designs by Lagoon, Leopard, and Fountaine Pajot. 

These are all fine vessels. But they were built to cater to the charter markets. And so they may not be the best boats for long-term, liveaboard cruisers. 

Charter vs Liveaboard Cruising

The typical charter catamaran accommodates three or four couples sailing for one to two weeks in the Caribbean or Mediterranean. Usually they will provision once, sail a few daylight hours, eat out more than a typical cruiser, and anchor or moor for the night.

Compare that itinerary to the typical liveaboard cruiser. 

Most cruisers spend over 90% of their time at anchor or a dock. They provision repeatedly and usually for many months at a time. Many cruisers rarely eat out at restaurants. And most importantly, cruisers sometimes sail non-stop through the night for multiple days or weeks when making a passage between cruising destinations. 

small fast cruising catamaran

The differences between charterers and cruisers cause them to desire different cabin layouts and amenities.

For charter boats, the focus is on several small cabins, each having its own accompanying head. They also have minimal storage space and enormous salons and cockpits. 

Long-term liveaboards generally desire a large master cabin, fewer heads, and significant storage space. They are usually willing to compromise space for superior sailing performance to reduce passage making days and increase safety by avoiding severe weather. 

Affordable Catamaran Market

Unfortunately for liveaboard cruisers interested in catamarans, the market is dominated by enormous, often very expensive, four cabin-four head charter models. In fact, our analysis of sales data suggests that about 38% of the market consists of Lagoon catamarans and over 50% are Lagoon or Fountaine Pajots. In addition, 90% of the market consists of catamarans over 38 feet in length. Please see the infographic. 

While a majority of catamarans for sale are large, expensive, charter catamarans, our site’s traffic suggests that 40% of buyers are looking for smaller, simpler, affordable catamarans under 38 feet in length. 

These are buyers like Carolyn was when she purchased S/V Barefoot Gal . And they are buyers who may be like you and are looking for something affordable that is suited to your liveaboard needs. 

Modest Cats for Cruisers

Consider widening your net. Here are some additional models to consider in your search:

Prout 37 Snowgoose

  • Cruising Grounds: Bluewater
  • Underbody: Fixed Keels
  • Draft (max): 2.08′
  • Mast Height: 40’ (Standard) / 50’ (Elite)
  • Bridgedeck Clearance: Average
  • Layouts: 3 cabins, 1 head; galley down; open version has larger salon while private stateroom has larger master cabin
  • Speed: Slow
  • Engines: Usually single outdrive; rare versions have twin inboards
  • Availability: Relatively common all over the world
  • Ballpark Price: Around $100,000 USD

small fast cruising catamaran

  • Cruising Grounds: Built for North Sea
  • Draft (max): 2.5′
  • Mast Height: tabernacle mast
  • Bridgedeck Clearance: Above Average
  • Layouts: 3 cabins, 1 head; galley down
  • Engines: Single gas outboard or twin inboard diesels
  • Availability: Somewhat rare; usually a couple on the market or 8M sister ship; more in Europe
  • Ballpark Price: Under $50,000 USD

Lagoon 37 TPI

  • Draft (max): 4′
  • Mast Height: 55’
  • Layouts: 3 or 4 cabin; 2 heads; galley down
  • Speed: Fast 
  • Engines: Twin inboard diesels 
  • Availability: Very rare; cult classic 
  • Ballpark Price: Over $100,000 USD 

small fast cruising catamaran

PDQ 36 Capella

  • Draft (max): 2.82′
  • Mast Height: 47’ (Standard) or 55’ (LRC)
  • Layouts: 2 or 3 cabin; 1 or 2 heads; galley down
  • Engines: Single gas outboard, twin gas outboard, or twin diesel inboard
  • Availability: Usually a few on the market and more likely in USA
  • Ballpark Price: Over $100,000 USD

Seawind 1000

  • Draft (max): 3.2′
  • Mast Height: 47’
  • Layouts: 4 cabins; 1 head; galley down
  • Speed: Fast
  • Engines: Twin gas outboard
  • Availability: Usually a few for sale; newer models still being built; originally built in Australia
  • Ballpark Price: Over $150,000 USD

small fast cruising catamaran

  • Cruising Grounds: Coastal
  • Draft (max): 3.35′
  • Layouts: 4 cabins or 2 cabin Maestro; 2 head; galley up
  • Engines: Twin inboard diesels with saildrives
  • Availability: Usually a couple on the market often in Caribbean
  • Ballpark Price: Around $150,000 USD

Endeavour 36

  • Draft (max): 2′ 9″
  • Layouts: 3 cabin; galley down
  • Engines: Twin inboard diesels
  • Availability: Rare and likely in the USA

small fast cruising catamaran

  • Draft (max): 3.62′
  • Mast Height: 55′
  • Layouts: 3 cabin / 1 head; 2 cabin / 2 head; galley up
  • Availability: More common especially in Caribbean
  • Ballpark Price: Newer version up to $300,000 USD
  • Underbody: Centerboards
  • Draft (max): 5′
  • Mast Height: 47’ (M) or 48’ (MC)
  • Bridgedeck Clearance: Below Average
  • Layouts: 3 cabin; 1 head; galley down but open
  • Engines: Single inboard diesel with retractable outdrive
  • Availability: Common especially in the USA

small fast cruising catamaran

  • Draft (max): 3′
  • Mast Height: 46′
  • Layouts: 4 cabin / 1 head; 3 cabin / 2 head; galley down; bathtubs on some
  • Engines: Single or twin inboard diesels
  • Availability: Rare model
  • Ballpark Price: Around $50,000 USD

Rick Marcarelli is the webmaster of CatamaranSite.com featuring cruising catamarans for sale by owner as well as educational articles. Rick is the owner of S/V Catalpa , a Catalac 8M based out of Merritt Island, Florida. The site also functions as the owner’s website for Catalac catamarans. If you are planning on buying a catamaran, CatamaranSite.com might save you a considerable amount of money and lead to years of happy sailing.

small fast cruising catamaran

And check out our other courses and products

small fast cruising catamaran

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Reader Interactions

January 31, 2021 at 5:58 pm

I would think draft on the fixed keel boats would be important to many who are considering cats.

Carolyn Shearlock says

February 1, 2021 at 12:49 pm

I’ll see if we can perhaps add that.

Richard says

February 9, 2021 at 11:03 am

Good addition. I have provided drafts to Carolyn, so please watch this article for that to be updated. Any questions or additional information you would like added please comment again.

Drew Frye says

February 20, 2021 at 11:46 am

The best way to look at speed ratings is the PHRF rating or other handicaps. I used to own a PDQ 32 and never found a Gemini I couldn’t pass rather easily on autopilot, so I don’t think it rates slow if well handled. Granted, mine was turboed a bit and carried a 120 rating.

Florida ratings, according to US Sailing

PDQ 32 135 Seawind 1000 137 PDQ 36 156 Gemini 105 MC 168 Snowgoose 250 The others rate around 130-145

And of course, this is only fast or slow within the class. Fast multihulls cruising (?) multihulls rate 0-60.

February 21, 2021 at 7:59 am

Thanks! Good info.

September 10, 2023 at 5:55 am

I have an Edel 35′. For their price, they are a good option, for this size of catamaran. They are not slow, by any means. Disadvantage: clearance under nacelle.

Erin Michaud says

February 23, 2021 at 10:22 am

Great info, we met an owner of a Catalac 9M in Key West Garrison Bight Marina a couple of weeks ago. His name is Eric & he moved his boat to the Boca Chica Navy Marina. I will send the contact info for Rick to him specifically for the Catalac boats! Thanks!

February 24, 2021 at 5:54 am

Catalacs are great boats. We saw a couple for sale around the time we bought Barefoot Gal but they were sold the same day they were listed so we didn’t get to even look at them.

January 6, 2022 at 11:32 am

Hello. I was wondering if you can identify this open catamaran which boasts a GRP cockpit with seating?

https://imgur.com/gallery/2wzUJmR

Bruce Bayne says

February 20, 2022 at 9:57 am

I noticed that the Privilege 37 and 39 were not mentioned in your 10 list of catamarans. Is there a reason? How do they stack up to the others with regard to speed and bridgedeck clearance?

June 6, 2022 at 10:44 am

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Best Cruising Catamarans

  • By Cruising World Editors
  • Updated: July 1, 2021

multihulls

Cruising catamarans have been around for decades, but early models—often plywood and fiberglass vessels built by their owners from plans and kits, kept the boats on the fringes of mainstream sailing. That all changed, though, as big roomy cats were discovered by sailors who went off to charter in the Caribbean, where the multihulls proved their worth as comfortable liveaboard and party boats.

Today’s bluewater catamarans roam the globe, carrying families to exotic destinations across the Pacific and beyond. Just as with their monohull cousins, there is no best catamaran. Instead there is a wide variety of designs, ranging from small catamarans that offer the ease of maintenance a couple might enjoy to performance catamarans capable of easily knocking off 250-mile days. Today, the best catamaran brands offer a range of size models and layouts that can be optimized for an owner sailing with family and friends, or for the charter market, where there’s a demand for four, five and even six cabins worth of accommodations.

The most prolific catamaran manufacturers are in France and South Africa where yards include both large-run production builders and niche companies building fewer than 10 boats a year.

The best cruising catamarans offer good load-carrying ability and respectable performance. As with any sailboat , a modern catamaran’s design is a result of compromises. Daggerboards or keels? Galley up or galley down? Spacious owner’s cabin or extra bunks? There are lots of options to choose from—and that’s what makes looking at these sailboats fun!

Here, then is an eclectic A to Z list of some of the best catamarans that have helped shaped the evolution of how we live and sail on two hulls.

Antares 44i

Antares 44i catamaran

Now built in Argentina as a full-fledged, bluewater catamaran and cruiser that can be safely operated by a shorthanded couple or family crew, the Antares 44i features a fully covered cockpit with a quartet of big, standard solar panels recessed within the hardtop, one example of a yacht capable of long-range passagemaking.

Atlantic 42

Atlantic 42 Catamaran

Almost 30 years ago, yacht designer Chris White revolutionized catamaran design with the first in his series of Atlantic cats, the primary feature of which was the innovative mid-ship sailing cockpit forward of the main cabin. The smallest in the Atlantic line, the 42 remains White’s most popular design ever.

Bahia 46 catamaran

Fountaine-Pajot has built so many outstanding cruising catamarans that it’s difficult to narrow down any single boat, but we’ve always been fans of the good-looking, well-thought-out Bahia 46. At 46 feet, the boat is large enough for offshore forays and has plenty of volume; with its simple but powerful sail plan, it’s also an excellent performer.

Catana 471 catamarans

Beginning around 1996, the French builder Catana was one of the first companies to manufacture fully found cruising cats for private ownership, and this Christophe Barreau design, which enjoyed a nearly 10-year production run from 1997-2006, was emblematic of this first generation of safe, fun, long-legged offshore voyagers.

Click here to see more cats from Catana.

Catana 50 catamaran

When it comes to speed, light boats are fast ones. And if you wish to save weight, that means exotic modern materials like carbon. Catana now infuses the laminates of their entire production line with carbon fiber, and for this list, we’ve chosen the Catana 50 Carbon, one of the zippiest cats now crossing oceans.

Click here to read about a couple’s charter aboard a Catana 50.

Gemini 105M

Gemini 105M catamaran

Pioneering catamaran sailor, builder and designer Tony Smith launched the first of his 33-foot Gemini 105M’s (10.5 meters = 33′) in 1993, and soon after found a ready and willing stream of sailors enamored of the boat’s compact size, affordable price tag, and such innovations as the nifty lifting rudder and transom steps.

Click here to read about the Gemini Legacy 35.

Gunboat 62 catamaran

Built between 2000-2005, the Gunboat 62 firmly established the Gunboat brand: go-anywhere cats that applied race-boat technology to a world-cruising platform. Hull no. 1, Tribe, was built for company founder Peter Johnstone, who then spent a year-and-a-half cruising with his family, smiling all the way.

Kronos 45 catamaran

French builder Henri Wauquiez is best known for his long career building monohulls, but the Kronos 45 cat, which he launched in 1992, was ahead of her time. Classic lines, the aft “targa bar” over the cockpit, the louvered coach roof windows, even the distinctive stripes on her hull: the Kronos 45 remains timeless.

Lagoon 380 catamaran

No roundup of cruising cats would be complete without several Lagoon entries, and the best of that impressive bunch might well be the Lagoon 380. Originally launched in 1999, and revered for its combination of quality, volume and performance, with over 740 boats built the 380 is still going strong.

Lagoon 440 catamaran

Launched five years after the breakthrough 380, the Lagoon 440 was an evolutionary design that featured a raised flybridge helm station, a unique “gullwing” configuration below the bridge deck, expanded windows in the hull and much more. With 400 boats built in a 6-year production run, the 440 was an unqualified success.

Lagoon 620 catamaran

How big can a production cat, still operable by a short-handed crew, really be? The builders at Lagoon discovered that 62-feet hit a sweet spot in the marketplace, and have sold over 70 boats since its introduction in 2010. The centerpiece of this design is the sensational steering station atop the flybridge, with expansive views of the sea and sky.

Click here to see more cats from Lagoon.

Leopard 40 catamaran

With an unmatched pedigree – designed by premier multihull naval architects Gino Morelli and Pete Melvin, built by the prestigious Robertson & Caine boatyard in South Africa, and commissioned by chartering giant The Moorings – the Leopard 40 was, perhaps unsurprisingly, Cruising World ’s Import Boat of the Year in 2005.

Louisiane 37

Louisiane 37 catamaran

Based on the famous French racing cat Charente-Maritime, the Louisiane 37, designed by Joubert/Nivelt and launched by builder Fountaine-Pajot in 1983, was a light, fast liveaboard cruiser with full accommodations that represented a radical departure from the hefty British cats that preceded it.

Maine Cat 30

Maine Cat 30 catamaran

One of the more versatile and clever cats ever created, the central feature of the cool Maine Cat 30 is the open bridge deck/living room sandwiched between the hulls and canopied by a rigid, permanent hard top (the comfortable accommodations/ staterooms are stationed in the hulls). Ideal for a winter in the Bahamas but with the ability to sail offshore, it’s a boat for all seasons and reasons.

Manta 42 catamaran

Built in Florida and beloved by the owners of the over 120 boats built during the company’s existence from 1993 to 2009, the Manta Catamarans range included 38-, 40- and 44-foot cats. For this exercise, however, we’re heralding the original Manta 42, which won the Best Value Overall prize in CW’s 2001 Boat of the Year contest.

Moorings 4800/Leopard 48

Leopard 48 catamaran

Another Leopard/Moorings collaboration built by the wizards at Robertson & Caine (though this boat was designed by fellow South African Alex Simonis), the Leopard 48 was another CW Boat of the Year winner with all the contemporary bells and whistles: forward cockpit, flybridge helm station and solid hardtop dodger, just to name a few.

Click here to read more about the Leopard 48, and click here to see more images.

Nautitech 441

Nautitech 441 catmaran

The Best Multihull Under 45 Feet: So said the CW judging panel in the 2013 Boat of the Year competition, regarding the Nautitech 441. But what makes this versatile platform so intriguing are the different helm set-ups. The 441 employs a single wheel, to starboard, ideal for solo sailors, while the 442 has a pair of helm stations aft.

Click here to see more Nautitech Catamarans.

Outremer 5X

Catamaran

A state-of-the-art all-oceans cat that exemplifies how far multihull design has come, the 59-foot Outremer 5X was a winner on both sides of the Atlantic, taking top honors in the European Boat of the Year competition in 2013, and following up as the Best Full-Size Multihull in CW ’s contest a year later.

Click here to see more cats from Outremer.

St. Francis 50

St. Francis 50

The flagship of the proud St. Francis line – built in South Africa since 1990 to designs by local legends Lavranos Marine Design – the St. Francis 50 is another “luxury cat” that shares much in common with an earlier 48-foot sister-ship, but packs even more payload into its roomier lines.

Click here to read more about the St. Francis 50

Seawind 1000

Seawind 1000 catamaran

Founded by Aussie surfer and sailor Richard Ward in 1982, the 33-foot Seawind 1000 is easily the most popular cruising cat ever built in Australia (the company has since moved its manufacturing and management operations to Vietnam). Roomy and airy, these cats dot the coastline of eastern Oz.

Seawind 1160

1160 catamaran

If the Seawind 1000 was a minimalist approach to cruising cats, the 38-foot Seawind 1160 is the flip side of the coin, a full-fledged long-range voyager. Among the reasons it was named CW ’s Most Innovative boat for 2007 is the unique “tri-folding” door that stashes overhead to open up the saloon and cockpit into a spacious living area.

Click here to read more about the Seawind 1160.

Sunsail 384

Sunsail 384 catamaran

Every sailboat is a compromise, and in the case of the Sunsail 384 (also sold privately as the Leopard 38) that’s a good thing, because designers Morrelli & Melvin and builder Robertson and Caine got the balance just right with this relatively small catamaran. With four cabins, the 384 can carry the same size bareboat charter crowd as her larger siblings, but does so with a decided bounce in her step. Named CW’s Import Boat of the Year in 2010, you can gauge the success of the design by the grins on the crew as they barrel down Sir Francis Drake channel in the British Virgin Islands.

Victoria 67

Victoria 67 catamaran

The French design office of Berret Racoupeau drafted the lines of Fountaine-Pajot’s new flagship, introduced in 2013, a magnificent world-girdling voyaging catamaran. Like other giant cats launched in recent years, the boat features a sensational upper deck with all sail controls, helm and lounging stations.

Click here to see more images of the Victoria 67.

Wharram Tanaroa

Wharram catamaran

No list of influential multihulls would be complete without the work of James Wharram, and while Tangaroa wasn’t a production cat by any means, it showcases the British designer’s respect for ancient Polynesian craft. Wharram sailed this 23-foot-6-inch “double-hulled canoe” across the Atlantic in the 1950s, and sold countless plans for similar boats for decades afterwards.

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Cruise, Play, Stay

With all the comforts of home, arrowcat brings back the 20' center console, a unique design, understand why.

Enjoy your boat year-round and stay warm and dry during cooler weather or overnight trips, while also having a comfortable and private space to retreat for whenever you need a break. Here are a few reasons why an ArrowCat power cat is an excellent boat to consider.

A Catamaran Boat

Catamarans have two hulls, which provide more stability in the water. They are less likely to roll or pitch, which means they offer a more comfortable ride, especially in rough conditions and for people who are prone to seasickness.

Power catamarans are typically more fuel-efficient than monohull boats of the same size. It requires less energy and yields more performance per HP. The two hulls create little to no drag or resistance to get on plane, resulting in greater fuel economy. Allowing for longer journeys with fewer refueling stops. 

Power catamarans have a shallow draft which means they can navigate in diverse cruising grounds – beaches, islands, rivers, channels, and coastal areas with limited water depth. 

An Express Cruiser

Cabin boats are designed with comfortable sleeping quarters and living spaces. They feature a sleeping space with a bed, a galley with a stove, sink, and refrigerator, and a head with a shower and toilet.

Cabin boats provide protection from the elements, such as wind, sun, and rain. This allows for comfortable cruising in a variety of weather conditions, as well as providing a haven during storms

Express cruisers are designed for efficient and fast navigation, offering higher speeds compared to traditional cruising boats. They usually have powerful engines that enable them to cover long distances quickly, making them ideal for day trips or weekend getaways.

Powered By Outboard Motors

Outboard motors can provide excellent performance and speed. They can often reach higher speeds than inboard motors of the same horsepower.

Outboard motors have a simple and standard design and are relatively easy to install, they do not require additional components such as a transmission, propeller shaft, couplings, and struts, that inboard engines do. They are easily assessable and cost less to maintain than inboard motors because they are mounted outside at the rear of the boat.

Outboard motors are often designed with features that make them easy to maneuver. For example, they can be tilted or rotated to provide precise control and handling in tight spaces and shallower waters.

ArrowCat Power Catamarans displaying galley countertops and refrigerator

ArrowCat Power Catamarans

The outboard powered express cruising catamaran.

ArrowCat Express Cruisers are designed from the ground up to maximize comfort, performance, durability, and fuel efficiency, making them a better choice for both in-shore and off-shore family cruising. We build our powercats with your safety and enjoyment in mind, designing our signature interior cabin so that you’re not limited by the outside elements, but rather have the ability to enjoy your vessel at any given time, regardless of weather or location. Superior construction, optimized performance, economy, and safety can be found in every ArrowCat we make.

Explore Our 32' & 42' Signature Cabin Models

Perfect for offshore and inshore cruising, long distance and overnight trips, cold off seasons and hot boating seasons, and much more. The ArrowCat 32-foot and 42-foot models provide an exciting and versatile experience on the water. Explore to see which one could best suit your boating lifestyle.

32' power catamaran in rough water

ArrowCat 320 Coupe

Express Cruiser Catamaran Hull Planing Hull Design Twin Outboard Motors Standard Layout: 2 Cabins/ 1 Wet Head Trailerable Optional Tower Upgrade LOA: 31′ 2″/9.50 meters Beam: 10’/3.05 meters Draft: 20″/.508 meters

ArrowCat 420 Coupe

Express Cruiser Yacht Catamaran Hull Planing Hull Design Twin Outboard Motors Standard Layout: 2 Cabins/ 1 Full Head LOA: 41′ 9″/12.73 meters Beam: 14′ 9″/4.5 meters Draft: 18″/.46 meters

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ArrowCat 420 Flybridge

Express Cruiser Yacht Catamaran Hull Planing Hull Design Twin Outboard Motors Standard Layout: 2 Cabins/ 1 Full Head LOA: 41′ 9″/12.78 meters Beam: 14′ 9″/4.5 meters Draft: 20″/.5 meters

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My Cruiser Life Magazine

How To Pick a Small Catamaran — Everything You Need to Know

Catamarans have had the sailing world abuzz for several decades now. To the salty monohull sailors’ chagrin, they aren’t going away any time soon. They’re roomy, comfortable, spacious, airy, and light-filled. They ride flat and don’t heel over when the breeze freshens. When you step aboard a modern catamaran, even the most landlubber-y of landlubbers can envision moving aboard and setting sail to distant horizons. 

There’s no set definition, so we’ll have to look to the boat manufacturers for answers. If you look at the lineup from Leopard, Lagoon, Fountaine Pajot, Bali, and others, you’ll find that the smallest cats are generally somewhere between 38 to 40 feet long. There are other manufacturers making some 35-foot boats, but these look a lot different.

The appeal of the small catamaran is nothing new, and many different boat makers have made attempts over the years. Here are a few things you might want to consider before purchasing a small catamaran boat.

small catamaran sailboat

Table of Contents

What is a small catamaran sailboat, pros of a small catamaran boat, cons of small catamaran boats, not all catamarans have the same feel.

  • Size (Of Your Liveaboard Catamaran) Matters 

Priorities: Affordable Catamarans or Small Catamarans?

  • Picking the Right Small Sail Catamaran 

Best Small Catamaran FAQs

For liveaboard, long-distance sailors, a small catamaran is a twin-hulled sailboat between 35 and 40 feet long. 

There are a few designs, but the most comfortable ones are those with wide beams and the hulls set farther apart. This size catamaran is necessary to ensure the boat can carry enough supplies and retains enough stability to be safe at sea. However, these small boats still feel very large and have beams of 19 to 21 feet. Boats of this size have twin diesel inboard engines. These boats come with four cabins or three cabins in an “owner’s version” layout.

Many of these boats could be described as French-style charter catamarans. Examples of boats like this include those made by Lagoon and Fountaine Pajot. South African companies like Leopard make them too, and there are a few one-off designs, like the American-made Manta share these features. 

Generally speaking, a 38-foot-long, 21-foot-wide sailboat is not a small one. But if you love the French-style catamaran, this is about the smallest you’ll find. That’s because this type of boat depends on its width for stability and its length for carrying a load. A shorter boat is very easy to overload. Most boat makers, Lagoon, Bali, Leopard, and the rest, currently make nothing less than 37 feet. 

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But there are some smaller options. 

On the other end of the spectrum from the super-wide French-style cat, there are small catamaran sailboat designs built for day-tripping and short-term coastal cruising. These are often narrower than offshore boats and can be stored in a regular boat slip. This is an especially important consideration in coastal areas where big offshore catamarans aren’t very common and marina options are limited. 

These boats will sometimes have beams of 15 feet or less. These smaller and lighter boats are often propelled by a single engine, either an inboard diesel or a gasoline outboard. All of these factors make them cheaper. 

Examples of boats like this, small and made for nearshore coastal cruising, are the 105MC from Gemini Catamarans and the Endeavour 30. The Gemini is one of the most popular coastal cruiser cats made. It is 35 feet long with a single center-mounted diesel inboard engine, retractable centerboards for shallow-water cruising, and distinctive hard dodger. They usually have two cabins or three cabins and one or two heads.

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A third group of catamarans doesn’t fit neatly into these two categories. They lie somewhere between small, say 30 to 37 feet, and are built well enough to be considered bluewater boats. They take their designs from seaworthy British catamarans built in the 1980s and 1990s, namely those built by Catalac and Prout. These were solid boats built tough to take on the North Sea that earned the excellent reputation they still have today. The Island Packet PacketCat and Dean Catamarans 365 are two more recent examples.

They tend not to be as beamy as the French charter catamarans and are much less common. However, for owners lucky enough to find a good one, they make excellent long-distance cruisers and liveaboard boats.

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Of course, the smallest catamaran of all is the beach cat that everyone is familiar with. It’s nothing more than two small hulls connected by poles and netting. Fun and fast, there’s no better toy on the resort’s beach. They have no interior accommodation—they are just for day sailing. We’ll keep our discussion limited to liveaboard catamaran options. 

Catamarans appeal to many sailors, but the reasons folks like them vary from person to person. For example, some are in love with the way cats sail. Faster and lighter than monohulls, they speed up quickly in light wind and skip over the waves. 

Others prefer the living space aboard a catamaran. They usually have open, airy salons with tons of light and fresh air everywhere. Big windows are the norm, unlike monohulls described by many as “caves.”

Here are a few reasons to consider a small catamaran with cabin. 

  • Cheaper than bigger catamarans
  • Shallow draft for exploring more places, especially compared to fixed keels on monohulls
  • Easy handling and happy sailing
  • Large windows and great ventilation in the living space
  • Large, open cockpits to entertain guests
  • Faster cruising than a similar-sized monohull
  • More interior living space than a monohull
  • Does not heal under sail as monohulls do—rides flatter
  • Fits in more slips and at more marinas than larger, wider boats
  • The narrower the boat, the more boatyards are available to you
  • One diesel engine price tag—keeps boat and maintenance cheap compared to twin inboard diesels
  • Option for outboard engines, which saves even more money in maintenance—some smaller boats have one or two outboard engines
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There are some struggles for catamaran and would-be catamaran owners, of course. But, by far, the biggest problem you’ll face with choosing a small catamaran is the problem of having limited choices. There aren’t many cats in the world when you compare them to monohulls, and those catamarans you find are more expensive.

Another problem with small catamarans is that they are very sensitive to overloading. While they have lots of storage space, they can’t hold much weight. As the hulls ride lower in the water, sailing performance and overall stability decrease. In other words, a catamaran will hold less weight than a monohull of a similar length.

  • Fewer available on the market than monohulls
  • Interior space feels different than that on bigger models
  • Weight carrying capacity is less than may be required for comfortable long-distance cruising
  • Lack of overall stability due to narrower beams
  • Seakeeping and ride qualities are poorer than long cats
  • Some find the ride quality of shorter catamarans to be uncomfortable
  • Lightly built with thin fiberglass layups, susceptible to flexing issues—some require more repair and maintenance than similar-sized and aged monohulls
  • High-quality offshore models are hard to find
  • Low bridgedeck clearance may mean wave slapping and pounding with some boats on some points of sail

Tips When Shopping for a Small Catamaran Sailboat

Here are a few things to remember if you want to purchase a small catamaran with cabin. 

When looking at the latest models, you’ll see that catamaran construction has changed quite a bit in the last two decades. So it’s really important to understand what you like so much about your dream catamaran. 

Is it the open feeling you get when standing in the salon, looking out of those huge windows? Or is it the way you can easily walk from the salon to the cockpit to the side decks or helm without stepping up and over seats, in and out of a deep cockpit? What about the easy access to your dinghy, which is on davits at the rear? Or maybe it’s the way that there’s plenty of light below decks in your cabin, and the boat feels open and airy?

The choices look very different when you start downsizing and looking at small cruising cats. Some or all of these features were things that designers had to learn to do. In some cases, they’re still learning how to do them. And in some cases, they’re impossible to do on a small boat. 

Size (Of Your Liveaboard Catamaran) Matters

Small catamarans have never been and will never be designed to carry a load. Catamarans are performance-oriented, even if some are built for charter and look like condo buildings. When you stuff too much weight in a catamaran, its sailing characteristics are degraded. As the waterline gets lower and lower, the boat sails noticeably slower, and stability is adversely affected. 

As a result, it’s frightfully easy to overload a small catamaran. Going out for a daysail is easy, as you might only bring a towel and some water. But living aboard or traveling long distances is another thing entirely. With a catamaran under 37 feet, it is very difficult not to overload it while keeping enough stuff—tools, spare parts, food/groceries, water, fuel, clothes, gadgets, books, etc. Cats 35 feet and under can be dangerously overloaded, which is another reason these boats are usually not generally considered bluewater vessels.

This is one of the biggest reasons you don’t see many small catamarans being built and crossing oceans—most people need more stuff than a small cat can safely hold. 

So with the quality of the living space and the weight of your stuff in mind, most cruising couples are most comfortable on a 40 or 42-foot catamaran. Peformance-wise, a 42 or 44-foot catamaran is the sweet spot for most. Unfortunately, these boats are expensive! Much more so than a 35-footer. 

Shorter catamarans also handle big seas differently. The shorter a catamaran is, the more likely it is to hobby horse—the tendency towards a quick, bow-up bow-down motion at sea. This is another reason that 44-footers are ideal—they’re long enough to escape this tendency and ride better in open water. Plus, their longer waterlines and narrower hulls mean these bigger cats will be significantly faster on all points of sail. If you want to see a list of bigger catamarans, check out our list of the best liveaboard catamarans .

So, you must approach your choice with these things in mind. A lot of people downsize their plans to fit their budget. But are you willing to put up with the problems associated with a smaller catamaran than you need? Would a different type of boat actually suit your goals better?

small catamaran boat

Picking the Right Small Sail Catamaran

Every boat purchase is a compromise, and there is never a perfect boat that can do everything. First, keep a clear mental picture of your goals and what you love about the catamarans you’ve seen. Then, keep an open mind! There are so many different types of boats, and catamarans are just one of them. 

When you’re ready to start shopping for a small catamaran sailboat, check out our list of cheap catamarans for some great options in the under-40-foot range.

What are small catamarans called?

A small catamaran is a boat with two hulls. The smallest are beach catamarans like the Hobie Cat . For liveaboard sailors, small catamarans are between 35 and 40 feet long.

How much does a small catamaran cost?

Prices for small catamarans vary greatly depending on the boat’s popularity, quality, and design. For example, one of the most popular small liveaboard catamarans is the French-built Lagoon 380, built from 1999 to 2020. Depending on features, age, and location, these boats currently sell for between $200,000 and $400,000. On the other hand, the much smaller American-built Gemini 105MC can be found for half as much. 

What is the best small catamaran to live on?

Everyone is looking for something a little different in their liveaboard catamaran. The Lagoon 380 and Fountaine Pajot Mahe are popular options if you’re looking for a spacious and comfortable charter catamaran. 

What is the smallest catamaran to circumnavigate?

Many catamarans in the 35-foot range have successfully circumnavigated. Smaller ones have likely made the trip, albeit less comfortably. But generally, most sailors agree that a 38 to 40-foot cat would be the smallest size that should make the trip, and a 42 to 44-footer would be best. The WorldARC, a 15-month-long around-the-world sailing rally hosted by the World Cruising Club, requires boats to have a 40-foot length, although they will consider smaller vessels on a case-by-case basis.  

small fast cruising catamaran

Matt has been boating around Florida for over 25 years in everything from small powerboats to large cruising catamarans. He currently lives aboard a 38-foot Cabo Rico sailboat with his wife Lucy and adventure dog Chelsea. Together, they cruise between winters in The Bahamas and summers in the Chesapeake Bay.

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small fast cruising catamaran

15 Small Liveaboard Catamarans

small fast cruising catamaran

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If you want to live on the sea, catamarans are probably the most comfortable way of doing it. Unlike monohulls, catamarans have two hulls, giving you a smooth sailing experience and more interior space. There are tons of small catamarans, each with its pros and cons.  

The smallest cruising/liveaboard sailing catamaran is the Smart Cat S280. With a length overall of 27.9 feet (8.5 meters), it offers the most economical and spacious living area you can find on any liveaboard catamaran today. 

In this article, I’ll talk about the Smart Cat S280, and then ill show you alternatives. This article is meant to give you examples of boats that might be interesting and it’s a jumping-off point for further research into what suits you the best.

Table of Contents

How To Pick a Small Catamaran

Small catamarans are great if you’re on a budget. They’re also ideal if you want a modest space without too much going on inside. However, every small-size catamaran varies in features and design. So, if you’re looking for one, there are a few essential factors you have to bear in mind.  

Performance

When choosing a catamaran , your decision depends on what level of performance you need from the boat. Your choice will often come from what you’re going to use the boat for. 

However, the performance of a catamaran is a critical factor for safety as well. For example, the sail plan significantly affects the catamaran’s stability offshore.

Some performance features you have to keep in mind when choosing a catamaran include:

  • Average Speed upwind and downwind
  • How much weight can be loaded before performance is impacted

Interior Layout

Despite their size, small catamarans come with a variety of living spaces. In between the hulls, you’ll find different types of amenities, including a kitchen, lounge, and dining area.  

Every catamaran comes with a unique arrangement for its cabins. Usually, you’ll also have cabins in the two hulls and sometimes a master cabin on the deck. The deck may also have a sitting space with trampoline areas to relax.

The cabins on a catamaran are sometimes referred to as berths. Manufacturers modify one or two berths to make a bathroom with a toilet and showerhead or “head.”

Exterior Design

The interior features are essential because they determine not only your living condition while onboard but also how easily the boat can be sailed, are all lines drawn to the cockpit?

Now that we know how to choose sailing catamarans, let’s look at the smallest liveaboard catamarans on the market today, starting with the most compact one.

Smart Cat S280: The Smallest Liveaboard Catamaran

The Smart Cat S280 is the smallest catamaran on the market today. The Korean-made catamaran offers a mix of space, shallow sailing, and affordability.

At the 2020 Miami Boat Show, the starting price of the Smart Cat S280 was $149,900.

It runs on a 19.8 Yamaha HorsePower engine with a 50 Horse Power option. Depending on your location, you can drop down or lift the engine out of the water. It holds a 102-liter (26.94-gallon) fuel tank and a 135-liter (35.66-gallon) water tank. 

The open hard-top version is ideal for summer sailing and boat parties. The cat is also available in a closed “house” version, allowing more privacy and climate protection. 

The boat features three queen-sized berths, office space, and a kitchen area. It has two living configurations:

  • Three cabins and one head
  • Two cabins and two heads

Each cabin berth has a double-sized bed. The bathroom contains a sink, a head and handheld shower, and an electric toilet. The wide lounge area with two trampolines can accommodate at least four seating positions. It also contains a drop-down anchor with an electric windlass.

The interior is fitted with broad windows and drop-down blinds, cabinet lockers, tour-size hanging closets, and LED step lights to guide you when lights are dim. It also has an 18,000 BTU air conditioning system controlled from the inside. The ceiling has a vinyl finishing, an upgrade from the carpet fabric finishing in previous models.

The kitchen space comes with storage cabinets, a DC 12 V 50-liter (13.2-gallon) refrigerator, enclosed refrigerator, microwave, coffee maker, electric stove burner, and a sink. It is wired with a Fusion audio system that includes two speakers.

The Smart Cat S280 supplies hot water to the kitchen and bathroom, thanks to an AC 120 V 6-gallon water heater. The head floor is wooden, while the cockpit has a patterned Seadek floor. 

The boat has a VHF radio, a Garmin sail pack navigation package, and a Garmin GPS Chart Plotter. It also includes wind speed and direction equipment, a depth sounder, and a compass. The rigging is performed with a steering wheel.

Specifications

The dimensions of the Smart Cat S280 are:

The Smart Cat S280 has made its mark as the ideal small-size cruise cat. However, there are other options on the market.

Other Small Sailing Catamarans

The Dean 365 is suitable for cruising coastal grounds. Made by Dean Catamarans in South Africa, it is 36 feet (10.97 meters) long with single or twin diesel engines. It can be configured to have four cabins and one showerhead or three cabins and two showerheads.

At $50,000, it features:

  • A 3-foot draft (0.91 meters)
  • A mast height of 46 feet (14.02 meters)
  • A Fixed Keels underbody
  • Weight of 6 tons (5,443.1 kg)
  • Speed of 6 to 7 knots
  • A beam of 17.7 feet (5.39 meters)

The Gemini 105 is one of the flagship boats of Gemini Catamarans. Initially manufactured in Maryland, the compact cat is now made in Florida. It’s 33 feet (10.05 meters) long with a layout of three cabins and one head.

Costing around $100,000, it contains:

  • Mast height of 47 feet (14.32 meters)
  • Maximum draft height of 5 feet (1.52 meters)
  • One diesel engine
  • Centerboards underbody
  • A beam of 14 feet (4.26 meters)
  • Speed of 8 knots
  • Weight of 4.8 tons (4,800 kg)

At 36 feet (10.97 meters), the Mahe 36 has two inboard diesel engines with sail drives. It contains three cabins and one head, or two cabins and two heads. 

Commonly found in the Caribbean, it costs about $300,000 and comes with:

  • A maximum draft height of 3.6 feet (1.09 meters)
  • Mast height of 55 feet (16.76 meters)
  • Fixed Keels underbody
  • A beam of 19.4 feet (5.91 meters)
  • A weight of 5.5 tons (4,989.52 kg)
  • A speed of 7 to 11 knots

Endeavor 36

The Endeavor 36 is a three-cabin catamaran commonly found in the United States coastal areas. This catamaran was made for easy handling and comfort. It is powered by twin diesel engines and costs about $100,000. 

It is 36 feet (10.97 meters) long and features:

  • A mast height of 47 feet (14.32 meters)
  • A maximum draft of 2.75 feet (0.84 meters)
  • An underbody of Fixed Keels
  • A beam of 15 feet (4.57 meters)
  • A speed of up to 8 knots

This catamaran is 37 feet (11.27 meters) long with an interior layout of four cabins. Running on twin diesel engines, it costs about $150,000. 

It also has:

  • A maximum draft height of 3.35 feet (1.02 meters)
  • A mast height of 55 feet (16.76 meters)
  • A beam of 19.68 feet (5.99 meters)
  • A fixed Keels underbody
  • A weight of 4.5 tons (4,500 kg)
  • A speed of up to 11 knots

Seawind 1000

The Seaweed 1000 is an Australian-made catamaran that is 37 feet (11.27 meters) long. It’s ideal for bluewater cruising with four cabins, one head, and a twin gas outboard engine. 

It costs over $150,000 and features:

  • A maximum draft height of 3.2 feet (0.97 meters)
  • A beam of 19.42 feet (5.92 meters)
  • A weight of 4 tons (4,000 kg)
  • A speed of 4.5 knots

PDQ 36 Capella

Designed by Alan Slater, the PDQ 36 Capella is a 36-foot (10.97 meter) long catamaran that costs around $100,000. Its engines can be single or twin gas outboard. It can also run on a twin diesel inboard engine. It contains two or three cabins and one or two heads. 

Some of its other features include:

  • A maximum draft height of 2.8 feet (0.85 meters)
  • A maximum mast height of 47 feet (14.32 meters)
  • A beam of 18.25 feet (5.56 meters)
  • A speed of 7 knots

Lagoon 37 TPI

The Lagoon 37 TPI is 37 feet (11.27 meter) long and costs over $100,000. It is a rare classic catamaran with three or four cabins and two heads. It uses two inboard diesel engines. 

  • A maximum draft height of 4 feet (1.21 meters)
  • A speed of 7 to 14 knots
  • A beam of 20.17 feet (6.15 meters)
  • A weight of 5.3 tons (5,300 kg)

This catamaran is 29.25 feet (8.92 meters) long, making it one of the smallest and most affordable on this list. With either a single gas outboard engine or twin inboard diesel engines, it’s an excellent catamaran for sailing the North Sea. 

It costs about $50,000, and features:

  • A tabernacle mast
  • A mast height of 54.5 feet (16.61 meters)
  • A draft of 3.33 feet (1.02 meters)

Prout 37 Snowgoose

The Prout 37 Snowgoose is 37 feet (11.27 meters) long and came after the Prout 35. It’s a great choice for bluewater sailing with three cabins and one head. They cost about $100,000 and run on a single outdrive engine, although some rare models have twin inboard engines. 

They also contain:

  • A maximum draft of 2.08 feet (0.63 meters)
  • A mast height of 40 feet (12.19 meters)
  • A weight of 5.5 tons (5,500 kg)
  • A draft of 3 feet (0.91 meters)
  • A beam of 6.25 feet (1.91 meters)

The Lagoon 380 is a bluewater catamaran that runs on twin diesel engines. Its price is $100,000, and it measures 37 feet (11.27 meters) in length. The boat launched in 1999 and is primarily found in Europe and the United States.

Some of its features include:

  • Two or three cabins and two heads
  • A mast height of 56.1 feet (17.09 meters)
  • A maximum draft of 3.83 feet (1.17 meters)
  • A beam of 21.42 feet (6.53 meters)
  • A speed of up to 10 knots
  • A weight of 7.1 tons (7,100 kg)

Prout Event 34

The Prout Event 34 looks just like the Snowgoose, although the latter is slightly bigger. It has two diesel engines that can support bluewater sailing. At 34 feet (10.36 meters), it costs nearly $30,000. 

The Prout Event 34’s interior includes three berths, one head, and office space. This catamaran is not commonly found worldwide, though a few can be located on European and American coastlines. 

It contains:

  • Maximum draft height of 2.72 feet (0.82 meters)
  • Mast height of 30.25 feet (9.22 meters)
  • A beam of 15.7 feet (4.78 meters)
  • A speed of 7 to 9 knots

Endeavor 30

The Endeavor 30 is 30 feet (9.14 meters) long with two cabins, a galley, a dining area, and two heads. Manufactured by Florida-based Endeavor Catamaran Corporation, the $80,000 catamaran has:

  • Sails that reach 7.5 knots
  • Mast height of 48 feet (14.63 meters)
  • Maximum draft of 2.83 feet (0.86 meters)
  • Headroom of 6.33 feet (1.93 meters)
  • A beam of 14.5 feet (4.42 meters)
  • A weight of 3.5 tons (3,500 kg)

Maine Cat 30

The Maine Cat 30 is a 30-foot (9.14 meters) long catamaran that costs over $100,000. It features a 26-gallon fuel tank and a 63-gallon (286.4 liter) freshwater tank. It has three double berths and one single berth.

The Maine Cat 30 contains:

  • A weight of 3 tons (3,000 kg)
  • 18-foot beam (5.48 meters)
  • Maximum draft of 5 feet (1.52 meters)
  • A speed of 5.5 to 6.5 knots
  • A mast height of 48 feet (14.63 meters)

Key Takeaways

The smallest liveaboard catamaran, the Smart Cat S280, is 27.9 feet (8.5 meters) long. However, numerous other options are available if you are looking for a small liveaboard catamaran.

Each of these options comes with different interior designs, exterior features, and performance specifications, so look at all your options to pick the best one for you!

Owner of CatamaranFreedom.com. A minimalist that has lived in a caravan in Sweden, 35ft Monohull in the Bahamas, and right now in his self-built Van. He just started the next adventure, to circumnavigate the world on a Catamaran!

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Small Sailing Catamarans: The Ultimate Guide

by Emma Sullivan | Aug 14, 2023 | Sailboat Gear and Equipment

small fast cruising catamaran

Short answer: Small sailing catamarans

Small sailing catamarans are multi-hulled boats that offer stability, speed, and ease of handling. They typically have two parallel hulls connected by a platform and are designed for recreational or racing purposes. Popular among sailors due to their maneuverability and shallow draft, they are suitable for both inland and coastal waters.

The Beauty of Small Sailing Catamarans: Why They’re Perfect for Adventurers

Are you an adventurer at heart, longing to set sail and explore the vast depths of the ocean ? If so, we have just the vessel that will capture your imagination and ignite your sense of wanderlust – small sailing catamarans. These marvels of engineering offer a unique sailing experience like no other, making them the perfect choice for those seeking both adrenaline-pumping escapades and tranquil moments at sea.

What makes small sailing catamarans so enthralling is their remarkable combination of stability, speed, and space. Unlike their monohull counterparts, which tip precariously with every gust of wind, catamarans gracefully slice through the water with elegance and poise. Their dual hull design effortlessly balances weight distribution, providing unparalleled stability even in rough seas. This ensures a smoother ride and allows adventurers to indulge in exciting activities without compromising safety.

Speaking of thrills, these nimble vessels possess an inherent need for speed – a characteristic that perfectly suits adventure enthusiasts who crave excitement on the open waters . With their lightweight build and low-drag hull design, small sailing catamarans are designed for rapid acceleration. Imagine skimming across waves at exhilarating speeds as you feel the salty mist caress your face; it’s an experience that truly elevates adrenaline levels to new heights!

But don’t let their penchant for speed fool you – these catamarans also cater to those yearning for serene moments amidst nature’s grandeur. When you have had your fill of fast-paced adventures, simply anchor in a secluded bay or sandy cove to relish peaceful sunsets or immerse yourself in snorkeling adventures beneath crystal-clear waters. The ample deck space offered by small sailing catamarans allows adventurers to bask in the serenity surrounding them while indulging in much-needed relaxation.

One might ask: what about onboard amenities? Small sailing catamarans boast of clever and innovative storage solutions that make them an adventurer’s dream. From hidden compartments to specialized equipment storage areas, these vessels are designed to accommodate all the gear an explorer could possibly need. Whether you’re a scuba diver with tanks and fins or a kayaker seeking new waterways to conquer, rest assured that your equipment will be stowed efficiently on board.

In addition, small sailing catamarans offer spacious cabins for overnight trips or long expeditions – a welcome respite from the elements after an adrenaline-filled day at sea. With comfortable sleeping quarters and well-appointed interiors, adventurers can enjoy a good night’s rest as they prepare for another day of unforgettable conquests.

The versatility of these stunning vessels also opens up opportunities for exploration in shallow waters unreachable by larger boats. The shallows hold their own charm with vibrant coral reefs teeming with exotic marine life waiting to be discovered. Small catamarans’ reduced draft allows adventurers to venture where others cannot, granting unrivaled access to unspoiled paradises that remain hidden to most.

So, if you’re an intrepid soul ready to embark on thrilling escapades on the high seas without compromising on comfort and stability, look no further than small sailing catamarans. These magnificent creations combine performance, resilience, and adventure into one breathtaking package – ensuring that every voyage is nothing short of extraordinary. Let the beauty of small sailing catamarans unleash the adventurer within you!

How to Choose the Right Small Sailing Catamaran for Your Needs

Are you dreaming of sailing the open seas, feeling the wind in your hair and the salt on your skin? If so, then choosing the right small sailing catamaran is crucial to ensure that your dreams become a reality. With so many options available in the market, it can be overwhelming to narrow down your choices. But fret not, as we have compiled a comprehensive guide to assist you in finding the perfect small sailing catamaran for your needs. So grab a cup of coffee, sit back, and let’s delve into this exciting world of sailboats!

1. Determine Your Sailing Goals: Before embarking on your catamaran search, it’s important to establish what you want from your sailing adventures . Are you looking for weekend getaways with friends and family or planning to circumnavigate the globe? Identifying your goals will help narrow down the size, features, and capabilities that your ideal catamaran must possess.

2. Consider Your Budget: Catamarans come in various price ranges depending on their size, brand, condition, and features. It’s crucial to understand how much you’re willing to invest in this endeavor. Keep in mind that besides purchasing costs, there will also be ongoing expenses such as mooring fees, maintenance costs, fuel consumption, insurance premiums etc. Setting a realistic budget will prevent potential financial strains down the line.

3. Size Matters: Catamarans generally range from 30 to 50 feet in length; however smaller ones tend to be more maneuverable and easier to handle. For novices or those who prefer solo sailing adventures, opting for a smaller sized catamaran might be a wise choice due its simplicity and ease of use.

4. Assess Performance & Stability: One of the main advantages of small sailing catamarans is their unparalleled stability compared to monohull boats; they are less prone to heel (tilting) which ensures a smoother ride even in rough waters. Performance wise, they are renowned for their speed and ability to slice through waves effortlessly, offering an exhilarating sailing experience .

5. Comfort & Accommodation: While small sailing catamarans may be compact in size, they still managed to maximize the available space for comfort and accommodation. Look for features such as spacious cabins, ample storage compartments, well-equipped galleys, comfortable seating areas, and a layout that suits your needs. Remember, the more comfortable you are on-board, the more enjoyable your sailing adventures will be.

6. Check Quality & Construction: Investing in a well-built catamaran is essential to ensure longevity and durability. Pay attention to the construction materials used; fiberglass is commonly utilized due to its strength and resistance against corrosion. Assess factors like build quality, reputation of the manufacturer, craftsmanship standards and seek expert opinion when necessary.

7. Seek Professional Help: If you’re new to the world of small sailing catamarans or feel overwhelmed by the decision-making process, consult with a professional yacht broker or sailboat specialist who can guide you towards making informed decisions based on your needs and preferences.

8. Research & Test Sail: Thoroughly research different models of small sailing catamarans that align with your requirements; read reviews, participate in online forums or sailboat communities to gather insights from experienced sailors. Additionally, wherever possible test sail various models before making your final decision – experiencing firsthand how a particular catamaran handles will allow you to gain valuable knowledge before committing.

Remember that choosing the right small sailing catamaran requires patience and due diligence. Take your time exploring all available options while keeping in mind your specific needs and preferences. By doing so, you’ll soon find yourself aboard an incredible vessel that will take you on unforgettable journeys across vast seas! Happy Sailing!

A Step-by-Step Guide to Building or Buying a Small Sailing Catamaran

Are you ready to set sail on your very own small sailing catamaran? Whether you’re a seasoned sailor or a beginner itching to embark on your sailing adventure, this step-by-step guide will walk you through the process of building or buying your dream boat. Get ready to navigate the waters with confidence and style !

Step 1: Determine Your Budget and Research Options Before diving headfirst into building or buying a small sailing catamaran, it’s crucial to establish your budget. Consider how much you’re willing to invest in this endeavor, factoring in costs such as materials, equipment, and professional assistance if needed. Once your budget is determined, start researching different options available on the market. Take note of key features and characteristics that align with your sailing preferences.

Step 2: Evaluate Building vs. Buying Now that you have an idea of what’s out there, it’s time to weigh the pros and cons of building versus buying a small sailing catamaran. Building a boat allows for customization and complete control over its design, but it can be time-consuming, challenging, and potentially more expensive. On the other hand, buying a pre-built catamaran offers convenience but may limit customization options. Carefully consider your skills, resources, and overall objectives before making a decision.

Step 3: Build Your Small Sailing Catamaran – DIY Style! If you’ve decided to take on the exciting journey of building your own small sailing catamaran, preparation is key! Start by gathering essential tools and obtaining comprehensive plans or blueprints from reputable sources. Familiarize yourself with different construction techniques like stitch-and-glue or strip planking—each having its own requirements based on materials chosen (fiberglass ply vs wood). Assemble necessary materials such as marine-grade plywood or fiberglass sheets while paying attention to quality and durability.

While constructing your small sailing catamaran at home may seem daunting at first, approach it with enthusiasm and attention to detail. Follow the plans step-by-step, ensuring precise measurements, accurate cutting, and thorough sealing. Seek guidance from experienced builders or seek advice through online forums dedicated to boat-building communities.

Step 4: Consider Professional Assistance For those lacking time, experience, or simply looking for a faster route, enlisting professional help may be a smart move. Consult with boat builders specializing in small sailing catamarans to discuss your requirements and desired specifications. They can guide you through the selection of materials, provide design recommendations based on your needs, and oversee the construction process.

While utilizing professional assistance may increase your budget initially, it offers peace of mind knowing that experts are handling the intricate details involved in crafting a seaworthy vessel.

Step 5: Owning Your Dream Small Sailing Catamaran – Things to Remember Congratulations! You’ve built or purchased your very own small sailing catamaran. But before setting sail into the sunset, there are a few important factors to keep in mind:

1. Safety First: Ensure your catamaran is equipped with all essential safety equipment including life vests, fire extinguishers, flares, and navigational tools like charts and compasses.

2. Maintenance Matters: Regularly inspect and maintain your catamaran’s hulls, rigging systems (including ropes), sails, and engines (if applicable). Proper upkeep will enhance performance and ensure longevity.

3. Expand Your Knowledge: Keep honing your sailing skills by attending courses or workshops offered by reputable sailing organizations. Strengthening your knowledge will enhance safety on board while broadening your horizons as a sailor.

4. Embrace Adventure: Finally, don’t forget why you embarked on this endeavor in the first place – to embark on exciting adventures! Explore new waterscapes while embracing the freedom and serenity that comes with owning a small sailing catamaran.

So there you have it – a comprehensive, step-by-step guide to building or buying your dream small sailing catamaran. May the winds be forever at your back as you set sail into this thrilling and wondrous world of sailing!

Frequently Asked Questions About Small Sailing Catamarans Answered

Frequently Asked Questions About Small Sailing Catamarans Answered: Sail the Seas with Ease!

Are you a sailing enthusiast searching for the perfect vessel to embark on your next adventure? Look no further than small sailing catamarans! These nifty crafts have gained popularity among sailors of all levels, thanks to their unique features and exceptional performance. However, we understand that you may still have some burning questions about these marvelous vessels. In this blog post, we’ll walk you through the frequently asked questions about small sailing catamarans and provide detailed and witty answers that will help you make an informed decision.

1. What makes small sailing catamarans different from other sailboats?

Ahoy there! Small sailing catamarans are quite distinct from traditional monohull sailboats. Unlike their single-hulled counterparts, these beauties boast two parallel hulls connected by a deck platform. This innovative design offers improved stability, reduced heeling (leaning), greater living space, and enhanced maneuverability – giving you ample freedom to explore the open waters like never before!

2. Are small sailing catamarans suitable for beginners?

Absolutely! One of the main advantages of small sailing catamarans is their user-friendly nature, making them an excellent choice for novice sailors. With their twin hulls promoting balance and stability, even those new to sailing can confidently navigate without fretting too much about capsizing or feeling uneasy at sea.

3. Can I experience high speeds on a small sailing catamaran?

Fun comes first when it comes to these agile watercraft! Thanks to their lightweight construction and efficient aerodynamics, small sailing catamarans are known for their remarkable speed potential. So if you’re looking for an adrenaline rush or simply wish to reach your destination swiftly while harnessing the power of wind , these vessels won’t disappoint.

4 . Are they spacious enough for extended cruising?

Oh yes! Space is not compromised aboard a small sailing catamaran. The dual-hull design offers a generous deck area that can be utilized for outdoor lounging, dining, and soaking up the sun’s glorious rays. In addition to this spectacular exterior space, these catamarans typically provide spacious cabins, salons, and ample storage compartments – making them perfect for extended cruising adventures without feeling cramped.

5. Can a small sailing catamaran handle rough seas?

Ahoy, Captain! While no boat is impervious to the vastness of Mother Nature’s wrath, small sailing catamarans are renowned for their resilience in challenging conditions. The robust construction and wider beam offer stability even in choppy waters. However, it’s always prudent to exercise caution and check weather conditions before setting sail on any vessel.

6. How about maintenance and docking?

Have no fear – maintaining a small sailing catamaran is not as daunting as you may imagine! Due to their lightweight materials such as fiberglass or carbon fiber composites, these vessels require less maintenance compared to traditional boats made of steel or wood. When it comes to docking, their maneuverability shines yet again! The dual-engine setup allows for precise control when navigating tight spaces or docking at marinas.

7. What about the cost? Are small sailing catamarans budget-friendly?

Now comes the juicy part – budgeting! Small sailing catamarans do tend to have a higher initial price tag compared to monohulls due to their advanced design features and improved performance capabilities. However, many sailors argue that the long-term benefits outweigh these upfront costs. Think fuel efficiency with less reliance on fossil fuels thanks to wind power—cutting down operational expenses and making them quite economical in the grand scheme of things!

So there you have it—the frequently asked questions about small sailing catamarans answered with wit and wisdom! These remarkable vessels combine stability, speed, and comfort while offering an unforgettable experience on the high seas. Whether you’re a seasoned sailor seeking a new adventure or a beginner looking for the perfect vessel to embark on your first voyage, small sailing catamarans may just be your ultimate ticket to maritime bliss. Anchors aweigh, sailors!

Exploring the Benefits of Small Sailing Catamarans: Speed, Stability, and More

Sailing enthusiasts are constantly seeking thrill and adventure on the open waters. Whether you’re an experienced sailor or a beginner heading out for your first voyage, choosing the right sailing vessel can make all the difference in your experience. While monohulls have been the traditional choice for many sailors, small sailing catamarans have gained immense popularity in recent years. These sleek and nimble vessels offer a host of benefits that make them an attractive option for any sailing enthusiast .

One of the most enticing advantages of small sailing catamarans is their exceptional speed. These multi-hulled vessels are designed to slice through water with minimal drag, allowing them to achieve impressive speeds even in light winds. Unlike their monohull counterparts, which rely heavily on heeling to generate forward momentum, catamarans can reach high velocities while maintaining stability and comfort.

Speaking of stability, this is another significant advantage that sets small sailing catamarans apart from monohulls. With two hulls instead of one, catamarans provide enhanced balance and reduced rolling motions. This means you can enjoy smooth sailing even in choppy conditions or strong winds . The absence of heeling – when a monohull tilts due to wind pressure – not only keeps passengers more comfortable but also eliminates the need for constant readjustment while underway.

Another benefit worth noting is how easy it is to handle a small sailing catamaran. Thanks to their twin hulls and wide beam, these vessels have incredible maneuverability compared to their single-hulled counterparts. They turn sharply and respond quickly to helm adjustments, granting sailors greater control over their course and making navigating tight spaces or crowded marinas a breeze.

Furthermore, small sailing catamarans offer generous space onboard that translates into increased comfort during trips on the water. Their broad decks provide ample room for lounging or socializing with friends and family while enjoying uninterrupted views of your surroundings. Many modern designs feature spacious cabins equipped with modern amenities, allowing for extended cruises without sacrificing comfort.

In addition to these primary advantages, small sailing catamarans also boast excellent fuel efficiency. With their lightweight construction and streamlined designs, they require less power to propel through the water when compared to heavier monohulls. This translates into reduced fuel consumption and lower operating costs, making catamarans an environmentally friendly choice as well.

Moreover, small sailing catamarans are highly versatile vessels that can adapt to various sailing experiences. Whether you’re looking for a thrilling race on the open ocean or a relaxed day trip exploring coastal bays and coves, these boats are up for any challenge. Their shallow draft enables them to access shallow waters or anchor close to shorelines that may be inaccessible to larger vessels. This versatility makes small sailing catamarans not only suitable for seasoned sailors but also an ideal choice for families or those new to sailing.

In conclusion, the benefits of small sailing catamarans are undeniable. From their remarkable speed and stability to their ease of handling and spaciousness onboard, these vessels offer an unmatched sailing experience. So whether you’re chasing adrenaline-fueled adventures or seeking a comfortable escape on the water, consider embracing the wonders that only a small sailing catamaran can provide – setting sail into smooth seas while leaving behind all your worries onshore.

Tips and Tricks for Maintenance and Upkeep of Small Sailing Catamarans

Welcome to our blog where we will share a plethora of invaluable tips and tricks for maintaining and keeping your small sailing catamarans in top-notch condition. Whether you are a seasoned sailor or just starting to explore the thrilling world of catamaran sailing, these well-researched insights are sure to help you enhance the lifespan and performance of your beloved vessel. So, without further ado, let’s dive right into our expert recommendations!

1. Meticulous Hull Cleaning: The hulls of your catamaran are constantly exposed to water , salt, algae, and other elements that can deteriorate its structural integrity over time. Regularly cleaning the hull with appropriate marine-grade cleaners not only removes unwanted substances but also prevents the accumulation of dirt that can add unnecessary weight and drag.

2. Rigging Inspection: Catamaran rigging plays a crucial role in ensuring sail efficiency and overall stability. Periodic inspections should be carried out to identify any signs of wear and tear on your mast, shrouds, forestay, and other components. Replacing worn-out parts promptly ensures optimal safety while sailing .

3. Sail Maintenance: Your sails act as the powerhouse propelling your catamaran through seas; hence it is imperative to give them proper attention. Avoid leaving your sails exposed to prolonged sunlight when not in use and regularly inspect them for any tears or loose stitching that might need immediate repair.

4. Anti-Fouling Protection: Applying an effective anti-fouling barrier on the bottom surface of your catamaran helps prevent marine organisms from attaching themselves to the hulls – saving you valuable time and effort spent on cleaning later on.

5. Battery Care: After a thrilling day out at sea, don’t forget about the batteries powering various systems onboard! Routinely checking battery terminals for corrosion and ensuring they are charged adequately will ensure uninterrupted functionality during future adventures.

6. Adequate Storage Solutions: Organizing storage space efficiently is crucial for maintaining a clutter-free and well-balanced catamaran. Investing in smart storage solutions, such as hooks, nets, or designated compartments for different equipment, can significantly contribute to the longevity of your vessel.

7. Regular Engine Maintenance: Engines are the backbone of any sailing experience, so regular maintenance is essential . Following manufacturer guidelines regarding oil changes, filter replacements, and general inspections will help keep your engines purring smoothly.

8. Safety Equipment Check: Safety should always be a top priority when sailing catamarans. Inspecting life jackets, flares, fire extinguishers, and other safety equipment at regular intervals ensures that they are in optimal working condition – contributing to peace of mind during your voyages.

9. Docking Techniques: Mastering proper docking techniques contributes not only to the smooth maneuverability of your catamaran but also protects it from accidental damage while mooring. Taking the time to practice docking methods can save you from costly repairs caused by mishaps.

10. Weather Monitoring: As with any water-based activity, keeping an eye on weather forecasts is imperative when planning your trips aboard a small sailing catamaran. Being aware of potential storms or unfavorable conditions empowers you with knowledge to make safer decisions while out at sea.

These tips and tricks form a comprehensive guide to prolonging the life and enhancing performance when it comes to maintaining small sailing catamarans. Implementing these suggestions alongside regular servicing and upkeep practices will undoubtedly result in countless unforgettable journeys on the open waters ahead! So hop aboard your small sailing catamaran and embark on new adventures with confidence!

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Learn the Basics of Small Catamaran Sailing: A Step-by-Step Guide

Alex Morgan

small fast cruising catamaran

Sailing a small catamaran can be an exhilarating experience, allowing you to harness the power of the wind and glide across the water. Whether you’re a beginner or have some sailing experience, learning the ins and outs of small catamaran sailing is essential for a safe and enjoyable adventure. In this comprehensive guide, we will take you through everything you need to know to sail a small catamaran effectively.

Introduction to Small Catamarans

Small catamarans are multi-hull sailboats that consist of two parallel hulls connected by a frame. They offer stability, speed, and maneuverability, making them popular among sailing enthusiasts. Before diving into the specifics of sailing a small catamaran, it’s important to understand the basics of this type of watercraft.

Getting Started with Small Catamaran Sailing

To begin your small catamaran sailing journey, there are a few key considerations to keep in mind. Choosing the right small catamaran that suits your needs and skill level is crucial. Understanding the basic parts of a small catamaran, such as the hulls, trampoline, mast, and sails, is also essential. having the appropriate safety equipment, including life jackets, a whistle, and a first aid kit, is paramount for a safe sailing experience.

Learning the Fundamentals of Small Catamaran Sailing

Learning the fundamentals of small catamaran sailing will lay the foundation for a successful and enjoyable sailing experience. This includes understanding the wind and its impact on sailing, the different points of sail, and the techniques of tacking and gybing. Proper sail trim and controlling speed and power are also important skills to master.

Basic Maneuvers in Small Catamaran Sailing

Once you have grasped the fundamentals, it’s time to learn some basic maneuvers in small catamaran sailing. This includes upwind sailing, downwind sailing, reaching, and capsize recovery. Knowing how to effectively navigate different wind angles and recover from a capsize will greatly enhance your catamaran sailing abilities.

Advanced Techniques for Small Catamaran Sailing

For those looking to take their small catamaran sailing skills to the next level, there are advanced techniques to explore. This includes learning trampoline techniques for maximizing speed and control, as well as rigging and tuning your catamaran for optimal performance. For those interested in competitive sailing, understanding racing strategies and tactics will be invaluable.

By following this guide, you will gain the knowledge and skills necessary to sail a small catamaran with confidence and explore the open waters with ease. So, let’s embark on this sailing adventure together and discover the thrill and serenity that small catamaran sailing has to offer.

– Small catamarans maximize space: Small catamarans provide a larger deck area compared to traditional boats, enabling sailors to have more room for activities and storage. This is especially beneficial for sailors who have limited space or prefer a compact vessel. – Small catamarans offer versatility: With their twin hull design, small catamarans are highly stable and capable of sailing in various conditions. They can handle both calm and rough waters, making them a versatile option for sailors looking to explore different sailing environments. – Safety is key: When sailing a small catamaran, it is important to prioritize safety. This includes choosing the right catamaran for your skill level, understanding the essential parts of the boat, and ensuring you have the necessary safety equipment on board.

Embarking on the thrilling adventure of small catamaran sailing? This section is your compass to getting started! We’ll navigate through the essential aspects of this exhilarating water sport. From choosing the perfect small catamaran to understanding its vital components, we’ll set you on course for success. Safety is paramount, so we’ll also explore the necessary equipment to ensure smooth sailing. Get ready to set sail and dive into the world of small catamaran sailing like a pro!

Choosing the Right Small Catamaran

To choose the right small catamaran, consider key factors. Here is a table summarizing important aspects to take into account:

Choosing the right small catamaran is crucial for an enjoyable and safe sailing experience. Consider factors like type of sailing, location, number of crew, skill level, and budget to find the perfect catamaran that meets your needs and preferences.

Fact: The fastest recorded speed on a small catamaran was 51.36 knots (about 59 mph), achieved by Paul Larsen of Australia in 2012.

Understanding the Basic Parts of a Small Catamaran

To gain a comprehensive understanding of the basic parts of a small catamaran, it is important to familiarize yourself with the key components that make up this type of watercraft. These components include the following:

1. Hulls: The main floating structures of the boat consist of two parallel hulls.

2. Beams: These connecting structures hold the hulls together and provide support for the deck.

3. Deck: The flat surface area serves as a platform for sailors to stand on and move around.

4. Trampoline: Positioned between the hulls and the deck, this mesh material adds stability, distributes weight, and offers a comfortable seating or lying area.

5. Rudders: Found at the rear of each hull, these control the direction of water flow and steer the catamaran.

6. Daggerboards: Retractable boards located on the underside of each hull, these prevent sideways drifting and enhance upwind performance.

7. Mast: A tall, vertical structure that supports the sails and captures the power of the wind.

8. Sails: Small catamarans typically have multiple sails, such as a mainsail and a jib or genoa, which harness the wind’s energy.

9. Rigging: Various ropes and cables are used to control the position and shape of the sails, allowing for adjustment of the angle and tension.

10. Trapeze wires: These adjustable wires enable sailors to shift their weight outboard, providing balance and counteracting the forces of the wind.

Knowledge of these basic parts is essential for safe and efficient sailing. Each component plays a significant role in the performance and maneuverability of the catamaran, ensuring a pleasurable experience on the water.

Essential Safety Equipment

The essential safety equipment for small catamaran sailing includes:

Life jackets: Each person on board should have a properly fitted life jacket approved by relevant authorities. Ensure accessibility and good condition.

Safety harnesses and tethers: Sailors wear these to prevent falling overboard. Harnesses must be securely attached to strong points on the boat, and sailors should always be tethered when on deck.

Flotation devices: Keep buoys or inflatable cushions readily available in case of emergencies. They can be thrown to a person overboard to provide buoyancy and aid in rescue.

Navigation lights: Essential for sailing at night or in low visibility conditions, helping other boats see you and avoid collisions.

First aid kit: A well-stocked kit should be on board for basic medical care during sailing.

Fire extinguisher: Crucial in case of fires or emergencies. Regularly check and maintain the extinguisher.

True story:

One sunny day, while sailing on a small catamaran, our crew encountered unexpected strong winds and choppy waters. Suddenly, a crew member lost their balance and fell overboard. Thanks to the safety harness and tether, they remained connected to the boat, preventing a potential disaster. With quick action, we threw a flotation device to the crew member, who held onto it until we could safely bring them back on board. This incident highlighted the importance of having essential safety equipment and practicing safety procedures while enjoying small catamaran sailing.

Mastering the art of sailing a small catamaran begins with understanding the fundamentals . In this section, we’ll dive into the essential skills and knowledge needed to navigate these agile vessels . Get ready to explore the impact of wind on sailing , discover the various points of sail , learn the techniques of tacking and gybing , understand the art of sail trim , and gain insights into controlling speed and power . By the end , you’ll be well-equipped to embark on your catamaran adventure with confidence and finesse.

Understanding Wind and Its Impact on Sailing

Understanding Wind and Its Impact on Sailing is crucial for small catamaran sailors. Consider the following key points:

– Wind powers sailing by propelling the boat forward and determining the direction of travel.

– The speed and direction of the wind significantly affect the sailboat’s performance. A strong and steady wind increases speed, while changes in wind direction require adjustments to course and sail trim.

– Sailors must understand different points of sail. These include close-hauled (sailing as close to the wind as possible), reaching (sailing at a slight angle to the wind), and running (sailing with the wind directly behind).

– Wind shifts, or changes in wind direction, demand continuous adjustments to maintain optimal speed and efficiency.

– Be aware of gusts , sudden increases in wind speed. Strong gusts can affect stability and require quick reactions to stay in control of the catamaran.

– Consider the impact of wind on waves and currents, as they can further influence performance and require adjustments in technique.

A thorough understanding of wind and its impact on sailing is crucial for small catamaran sailors to navigate safely, optimize performance, and enjoy a successful experience.

Points of Sail

The sub-topic “ Points of Sail ” can be presented in a table to provide a clear understanding of each point of sail and the corresponding wind direction.

Each point of sail represents a different angle of the wind in relation to the boat. Understanding the points of sail is crucial for controlling the boat’s direction and speed. By adjusting the sail trim according to the wind direction, sailors can optimize the boat’s performance and make efficient use of the wind’s power. It is important to note that the boat’s movement and performance may vary depending on factors such as wind speed and sail size. By familiarizing themselves with the points of sail, sailors can navigate effectively and enjoy the thrill of small catamaran sailing.

Tacking and Gybing

To tack , steer the boat towards the wind to change direction. Release the mainsail sheet and jib sheet to allow the sails to luff. Turn the tiller or wheel away from the wind to bring the bow of the boat through the wind. Trim the sails on the new tack by pulling in the mainsail sheet and jib sheet. Adjust the sails as needed to find the correct angle to the wind for the new course.

To gybe , steer the boat away from the wind to change direction. Release the mainsail sheet and jib sheet to allow the sails to luff. Turn the tiller or wheel towards the wind to bring the stern of the boat through the wind. Trim the sails on the new tack by pulling in the mainsail sheet and jib sheet. Adjust the sails as needed to find the correct angle to the wind for the new course.

Tacking and gybing are essential maneuvers in small catamaran sailing. Tacking allows the boat to change course while sailing upwind, while gybing is used when changing course while sailing downwind. By following the steps above, sailors can effectively perform tacking and gybing maneuvers. It is important to release the sails and steer the boat correctly to ensure a smooth transition through the wind. Trimming the sails and adjusting them as necessary on the new tack or gybe will help maintain control and optimize the boat’s performance. Practice and experience are key to mastering these maneuvers and becoming a skilled small catamaran sailor.

When it comes to small catamaran sailing, proper sail trim is crucial for optimal performance. Here are some key considerations for achieving the correct sail trim:

– Adjust the main sail: Trim the main sail by tightening or loosening the main sheet. A well-trimmed main sail will have a smooth shape and minimal wrinkles.

– Trim the jib sail: Control the tension and shape of the jib sail using the jib sheet. The jib should complement the main sail with a balanced and efficient shape.

– Use telltales: Utilize telltales, small ribbons or strips of fabric attached to the sails, to gauge airflow. Observing the telltales will help determine if adjustments are needed.

– Consider wind conditions: Adjust sail trim based on prevailing wind conditions. In lighter winds, looser sails are needed to catch lighter breezes. In stronger winds, tighten the sails to reduce heeling and maintain control.

– Regularly reassess: Continuously monitor and reassess sail trim throughout your session. Small adjustments may be necessary as wind conditions change or as you change course.

By paying attention to sail trim and making necessary adjustments, you can optimize your small catamaran’s performance and ensure an enjoyable sailing experience.

Suggestions: Practice sail trim techniques regularly to improve your skills. Experiment with different settings and observe how they affect your boat’s speed and stability. Seek advice from experienced sailors or consider taking sailing courses to enhance your understanding and proficiency in sail trim.

Controlling Speed and Power

Controlling speed and power in small catamaran sailing is crucial and involves several important steps. One of the key steps is to trim the sails by adjusting their position to optimize their shape and efficiently catch the wind, which ultimately leads to increased speed and power. Another important factor is to adjust the weight distribution by shifting the body weight to balance the boat and effectively control the speed. Moving the weight forward will enhance the speed, while moving it backward will slow down the catamaran.

It is essential to utilize the rudder to steer the catamaran and make small course adjustments. By using the rudder effectively, one can maintain speed and control. Another aspect to consider is harnessing the wind . It is crucial to pay attention to the wind direction and strength and adjust the sails and course accordingly. This will help to maintain a consistent speed and power throughout the sailing.

Practicing proper technique plays a significant role in controlling speed and power. It is essential to master techniques such as tacking and gybing , as they enable smooth transitions and help in maintaining speed and power during maneuvers.

It is important to remember that controlling speed and power in small catamaran sailing requires practice and experience. By honing your skills and understanding the dynamics of the boat and wind, you can become more proficient in controlling speed and power effectively.

I can personally attest to the significance of constantly fine-tuning technique in optimizing speed and power in small catamaran sailing. In a sailing race, I found myself trailing behind other boats. By experimenting with weight distribution and sail trim, I quickly caught up to the rest of the fleet. This experience taught me the importance of continuously refining my technique to achieve the optimal speed and power in small catamaran sailing.

Basic Manuevers in Small Catamaran Sailing

Mastering the art of sailing a small catamaran starts with understanding the basic maneuvers. In this section, we’ll uncover the secrets of upwind sailing , downwind sailing , reaching , and capsize recovery . Get ready to glide through the water with precision and agility as we explore the techniques and skills necessary to maneuver your small catamaran with ease. So, tighten those sails, secure your position, and let’s dive into the thrilling world of catamaran sailing .

Upwind Sailing

Position yourself in the boat for upwind sailing: Sit on the trampoline with your feet facing forward, one foot in front of the other, for balance and stability.

Check the wind direction for upwind sailing: Look at the wind indicator, such as the telltales or flags , to determine the wind’s direction.

Trim the sails for upwind sailing: Adjust the sails to efficiently catch the wind. Increase the curvature of the sails for better lift.

Find the correct angle for upwind sailing: Point the boat’s bow slightly toward the wind direction, known as pointing upwind.

Use the telltales for upwind sailing: Pay attention to the telltales on the sails to ensure they are flying smoothly.

Sheet in the sails for upwind sailing: Pull in the sheets to control the sails, balancing power and speed.

Keep the boat flat for upwind sailing: Distribute your weight evenly on the trampoline and adjust your body position to counterbalance the wind’s force.

Practice active steering for upwind sailing: Use the tiller or steering controls to make small course corrections, maintaining a consistent trajectory.

Avoid excessive heel for upwind sailing: Control the heeling angle by depowering the sails or adjusting your weight distribution to prevent tipping.

Anticipate gusts for upwind sailing: Be prepared for sudden increases in wind speed and adjust your sail trim and body position as needed.

Stay focused for upwind sailing: Maintain concentration and constantly assess the wind and your boat’s performance.

By following these steps, you can effectively sail upwind and make progress against the wind. Remember to practice and refine your technique to enhance your skills in upwind sailing.

Downwind Sailing

Downwind sailing is an exciting technique in small catamaran sailing. Follow these steps to successfully navigate downwind:

  • Position your catamaran with the wind behind you.
  • Release or ease out the sails to capture as much wind as possible for optimal downwind sailing.
  • Keep a close eye on sail trim and make adjustments to maintain peak performance.
  • Utilize the rudders to steer the boat in the desired direction, noting that less rudder input may be needed when turning downwind.
  • Stay mindful of possible gybing, where the sail suddenly moves from one side of the boat to the other due to a change in wind direction. To prevent this, carefully monitor the wind and make necessary course adjustments.
  • Embrace the exhilaration of effortlessly gliding across the water, harnessing the power of the wind during downwind sailing.

Downwind sailing has been utilized by sailors for centuries, enabling efficient navigation of the seas. It gained significant importance during the era of sail-powered ships, as sailors discovered the advantages of utilizing favorable wind directions and currents to optimize speed and efficiency. The technique of downwind sailing continues to evolve with the incorporation of advanced technologies in modern catamarans and sailing vessels, striving to maximize performance and speed. Today, downwind sailing not only remains practical but also provides a thrilling experience for sailors, allowing them to embrace the immense power of nature and the captivating beauty of the open water.

Reaching is a sailing technique used in small catamaran sailing to sail at an angle where the wind is coming from behind the boat. It allows the boat to sail faster and more efficiently.

To reach , the sailor adjusts the sails to maximize surface area and catch as much wind as possible. This propels the catamaran forward.

During reaching , the sailor positions themselves on the trampoline or the windward hull for stability and control. They also monitor wind direction and make adjustments to maintain the desired angle and speed.

Reaching is exciting for sailors as it enables higher speeds and the thrill of the wind propelling the boat. It requires skill and practice, but once mastered, reaching enhances the overall sailing experience on a small catamaran.

Capsize Recovery

Capsize Recovery is vital for small catamaran sailing. Here is a guide to effectively recover from a capsize:

  • Stay calm and assess the situation.
  • Hold onto the boat and ensure everyone is accounted for.
  • Signal for help if necessary, especially in a busy waterway.
  • Try to right the boat by pushing down on the centerboard or daggerboard.
  • If the boat does not quickly right itself, climb onto the hull that is out of the water to make it easier.
  • Once the boat is upright, climb back onboard and assess any damage.
  • Bail out any remaining water using buckets or bailers.
  • Check all rigging and equipment for damage.
  • Restart the engine or raise the sails to continue sailing.

Pro-tip: Practice capsize recovery maneuvers in a controlled environment before sailing in challenging conditions. This builds confidence and improves your ability to react quickly and effectively in case of a capsize.

Mastering the art of small catamaran sailing goes beyond the basics. In this section, we dive into the realm of advanced techniques that will take your skills to the next level . Get ready to explore trampoline techniques that enhance stability, rigging and tuning methods that optimize performance, and racing strategies that give you a competitive edge. Brace yourself for a thrilling ride as we uncover the secrets to unlocking the true potential of small catamaran sailing .

Trampoline Techniques

  • Using the trampoline: The trampoline on a small catamaran is crucial for various techniques.
  • Getting on and off: When boarding the catamaran, step onto the trampoline from the boat’s side. To disembark, step off the trampoline onto a stable surface.
  • Balancing: While sailing, balance your weight on the trampoline to maintain stability and prevent tipping.
  • Leaning out: In strong winds, lean over the trampoline to counterbalance the force of the wind and prevent capsizing.
  • Jumping: Jumping on the trampoline can generate extra power and speed in light wind conditions.
  • Moving around: Use the trampoline to move from one side of the boat to the other. Step carefully and hold onto the boat for stability.
  • Handling waves: When sailing through waves, use the trampoline to absorb shock and maintain balance.
  • Practicing maneuvers: The trampoline provides a stable surface for practicing tacking, gybing, and other maneuvers.
  • Safety precautions: Always hold onto the trampoline when moving around the boat to prevent falling overboard.

Rigging and Tuning

Rigging and tuning are crucial for small catamaran sailing. Here are some essential aspects to consider:

– Rigging: It’s vital to set up and secure the mast, boom, and other rigging components correctly. Check the tension of the rigging wire to ensure proper sail shape and stability.

– Sail control: Understanding how to use control lines, such as the mainsheet and traveler, is key to adjusting sail position and shape. These controls optimize performance and balance the catamaran.

– Adjustable trampoline: Many small catamarans have an adjustable trampoline that allows for different sailing positions and crew weight distribution. This feature affects stability and handling.

– Wind indicator: Installing a wind indicator on the mast or sail provides valuable information about wind direction and intensity. It allows for adjustments in sail trim and steering to maximize speed and efficiency.

– Centerboard or daggerboard adjustment: Depending on the catamaran’s design, adjusting the centerboard or daggerboard position significantly impacts stability and overall sailing performance. Knowing when and how to adjust them is crucial.

– Regular maintenance: It’s important to inspect rigging components for any signs of wear, tear, or damage. Regularly checking knots and connections ensures they remain secure and in good condition.

– Experience and guidance: Rigging and tuning a small catamaran can be challenging for beginners. Seeking guidance from experienced sailors or professionals will help improve sailing skills.

By giving attention to rigging and tuning, sailors can optimize the performance and handling of their small catamarans, resulting in a smoother and more enjoyable sailing experience.

Racing Strategies

  • To maximize performance on the water, it is important to start with a good racing strategy. This includes determining wind direction and planning the best position to gain an advantage.
  • One crucial aspect of racing strategies is mastering boat handling. It is essential to practice maneuvering your small catamaran smoothly and efficiently, especially during mark rounding and tight turns.
  • Another key racing strategy is learning to read wind shifts. By observing wind patterns and anticipating changes, you can adjust your sailing strategy accordingly.
  • It is imperative to understand racing rules in order to compete fairly and avoid penalties. Familiarizing yourself with small catamaran racing rules is essential.
  • Staying aware of the competition is a vital part of racing strategies. By keeping an eye on fellow racers, you can identify their strengths and weaknesses, aiding in tactical decision-making.
  • Developing a strong downwind strategy is crucial. This involves utilizing techniques like gybing and surfing waves to maintain speed and gain an advantage.
  • Being adaptable is key in racing. Racing conditions can change rapidly, so it is important to be prepared to adjust your strategy and tactics as needed.

Fact: Small catamarans are known for their speed and agility, requiring effective racing strategies to excel in competition.

Some Facts About How To Sail A Small Catamaran:

  • ✅ Learning how to sail a small catamaran can be an exciting and freeing experience. (Source: catamaranfreedom.com)
  • ✅ Familiarize yourself with the essential parts of the catamaran and common sailing terms. (Source: catamaranfreedom.com)
  • ✅ Understand the points of sail, steering, and turning the catamaran. (Source: catamaranfreedom.com)
  • ✅ Raising and trimming the sails is crucial to capture the wind effectively. (Source: catamaranfreedom.com)
  • ✅ Slowing down and stopping the catamaran can be achieved by loosening the sails to spill wind. (Source: catamaranfreedom.com)

Frequently Asked Questions

1. how do i position a small catamaran when sailing on a beam reach or a broad reach.

When sailing on a beam reach, the wind is coming directly across the side of the boat at a 90-degree angle. To position the catamaran, the sailboat’s direction should be perpendicular to the wind, with one hull leading the way.

On a broad reach, the wind is coming between the stern and the side of the boat at a 45-degree angle. To position the catamaran, adjust the sailboat’s course so that both hulls are approximately facing the direction of the wind.

2. What are the essential parts of a small catamaran?

The essential parts of a small catamaran, also known as a beach cat, include the hulls, tiller, rudder, keel, mast, mainsail, foresail, and boom. These components work together to control the direction and speed of the catamaran when sailing.

3. How should I handle the tiller when sailing a small catamaran?

When sailing a small catamaran, it is important to sit in the opposite direction of the sail to counterbalance the tilting effect caused by the wind. To steer the catamaran, use the tiller by moving it in the opposite direction of the desired turn. It may take some practice to get used to the opposite directions of the tiller.

4. What sailing gear do I need when sailing a small catamaran?

When sailing a small catamaran, it is important to have the appropriate sailing gear. This includes shoes, gloves, sunglasses, a windbreaker, a logbook, a compass or GPS, and a first aid kit. These items will help ensure your safety and comfort while on the catamaran.

5. How do I turn the catamaran into the wind when sailing close-hauled?

To turn the catamaran into the wind when sailing close-hauled, a maneuver known as tacking is used. Move the tiller toward the sail to pass the bows through the wind. Exchange the mainsheet and tiller extension, and then straighten the tiller to complete the turn.

6. How do I slow down and stop the catamaran when sailing?

To slow down and stop the catamaran when sailing, you can loosen the sails to spill the wind. Let out and loosen the sails until they luff or flap. You can also turn the boat towards the wind to maximize resistance, bringing the catamaran to a halt.

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10 Best Small Sailboats (Under 20 Feet)

Best Small Sailboats Under 20 Feet | Life of Sailing

Last Updated by

Daniel Wade

December 28, 2023

Compact, easy to trailer, simple to rig, easy to maintain and manage, and affordable, the best small boats all have one thing in common: they offer loads of fun while out there on the water.

So whether you're on a budget or just looking for something that can offer ultimate daytime rides without compromising on safety, aesthetic sensibilities, alternate propulsion, and speed, the best small sailboats under 20 feet should be the only way to go.

Let's be brutally honest here; not everyone needs a 30-foot sailboat to go sailing. They come with lots of features such as electronics, entertainment, refrigeration, bunks, a galley, and even a head. But do you really need all these features to go sailing? We don't think so.

All you need to go sailing is a hull, a mast, rudder, and, of course, a sail. And whether you refer to them as daysailers, trailerable sailboats , a weekender sailboat, or pocket cruisers, there's no better way to enjoy the thrills of coastal sailing than on small sailboats.

There are a wide range of small boats measuring less than 20 feet available in the market. These are hot products in the market given that they offer immense thrills out on the sea without the commitment required to cruise on a 30-footer. A small sailboat will not only give you the feel of every breeze but will also give you the chance to instantly sense every change in trim.

In this article, we'll highlight 10 best small sailboats under 20 feet . Most models in this list are time-tested, easy to rig, simple to sail, extremely fun, and perfect either for solo sailing or for sailing with friends and family. So if you've been looking for a list of some of the best small sailboats , you've come to the right place.

So without further ado, let's roll on.

Table of contents

{{boat-info="/boats/hunter-15"}}

The Marlow-Hunter 15 is not only easy to own since it's one of the most affordable small sailboats but also lots of fun to sail. This is a safe and versatile sailboat for everyone. Whether you're sailing with your family or as a greenhorn, you'll love the Hunter 15 thanks to its raised boom, high freeboard, and sturdy FRP construction.

With high sides, a comfortable wide beam, a contoured self-bailing cockpit, and fiberglass construction, the Hunter 15 is certainly designed with the novice sailor in mind. This is why you can do a lot with this boat without falling out, breaking it, or capsizing. Its contoured self-baiting cockpit will enable you to find a fast exit while its wide beam will keep it steady and stable no matter what jibes or weight shifts happen along the way.

This is a small sailboat that can hold up to four people. It's designed to give you a confident feeling and peace of mind even when sailing with kids. It's easy to trailer, easy to rig, and easy to launch. With a price tag of about $10k, the Hunter 15 is a fun, affordable, and versatile boat that is perfect for both seasoned sailors and novices. It's a low-maintenance sailboat that can be great for teaching kids a thing or two about sailing.

Catalina 16.5

{{boat-info="/boats/catalina-16-5"}}

Catalina Yachts are synonymous with bigger boats but they have some great and smaller boats too such as Catalina 16.5. This is one of the best small sailboats that are ideal for family outings given that it has a big and roomy cockpit, as well as a large storage locker. Designed with a hand-laminated fiberglass sloop, the Catalina 16.5 is versatile and is available in two designs: the centerboard model and the keel model.

The centerboard model is designed with a powerful sailplane that remains balanced as a result of the fiberglass centerboard, the stable hull form, and the rudder. It also comes with a tiller extension, adjustable hiking straps, and adjustable overhaul. It's important to note that these are standard equipment in the two models.

As far as the keel model is concerned, this is designed with a high aspect keel as the cast lead and is attached with stainless steel keel bolts, which makes this model perfect for mooring or docking whenever it's not in use. In essence, the centerboard model is perfect if you'll store it in a trailer while the keel model can remain at the dock.

All in all, the Catalina 16.5 is one of the best small sailboats that you can get your hands on for as low as $10,000. This is certainly a great example of exactly what a daysailer should be.

{{boat-info="/boats/hobie-16"}}

There's no list of small, trailerable, and fun sailboats that can be complete without the inclusion of the classic Hobie 16. This is a durable design that has been around and diligently graced various waters across the globe since its debut way back in 1969 in Southern California. In addition to being durable, the Hobie 16 is trailerable, great for speed, weighs only 320 pounds, great for four people, and more importantly, offers absolute fun.

With a remarkable figure of over 100,000 launched since its debut, it's easy to see that the Hobie 16 is highly popular. Part of this popularity comes from its asymmetric fiberglass-and-foam sandwiched hulls that include kick-up rudders. This is a great feature that allows it to sail up to the beach.

For about $12,000, the Hobie 16 will provide you with endless fun throughout the summer. It's equipped with a spinnaker, trailer, and douse kit. This is a high-speed sailboat that has a large trampoline to offer lots of space not just for your feet but also to hand off the double trapezes.

Montgomery 17

{{boat-info="/boats/montgomery-17"}}

Popularly known as the M-17, The Montgomery 17 was designed by Lyle C. Hess in conjunction with Jerry Montgomery in Ontario, California for Montgomery Boats. Designed either with keel or centerboard models, the M-17 is more stable than most boats of her size. This boat is small enough to be trailered but also capable of doing moderate offshore passages.

This small sailboat is designed with a masthead and toe rail that can fit most foresails. It also has enough space for two thanks to its cuddly cabin, which offers a sitting headroom, a portable toilet, a pair of bunks, a DC power, and optional shore, and a proper amount of storage. That's not all; you can easily raise the deck-stepped mast using a four-part tackle.

In terms of performance, the M-17 is one of the giant-killers out there. This is a small sailboat that will excel in the extremes and make its way past larger boats such as the Catalina 22. It glides along beautifully and is a dog in light air, though it won't sail against a 25-knot wind, which can be frustrating. Other than that, the Montgomery 17 is a great small sailboat that can be yours for about $14,000.

Norseboat 17.5

{{boat-info="/boats/norseboat-17-5"}}

As a versatile daysailer, Norseboat 17.5 follows a simple concept of seaworthiness and high-performance. This small sailboat perfectly combines both contemporary construction and traditional aesthetics. Imagine a sailboat that calls itself the "Swiss Army Knife of Boats!" Well, this is a boat that can sail and row equally well.

Whether you're stepping down from a larger cruiser or stepping up from a sea kayak, the unique Norseboat 17.5 is balanced, attractive, and salty. It has curvaceous wishbone gaff, it is saucy, and has a stubby bow-sprit that makes it attractive to the eyes. In addition to her beauty, the Norseboat 17.5 offers an energy-pinching challenge, is self-sufficient, and offers more than what you're used to.

This is a small, lightweight, low-maintenance sailboat that offers a ticket to both sailing and rowing adventures all at the same time. At about 400 pounds, it's very portable and highly convenient. Its mainsails may look small but you'll be surprised at how the boat is responsive to it. With a $12,500 price tag, this is a good small sailboat that offers you the versatility to either row or sail.

{{boat-info="/boats/sage-marine-sage-17"}}

If you've been looking for a pocket cruiser that inspires confidence, especially in shoal water, look no further than the Sage 17. Designed by Jerry Montgomery in 2009, the Sage 17 is stable and should heel to 10 degrees while stiffening up. And because you want to feel secure while sailing, stability is an integral feature of the Sage 17.

This is a sailboat that will remain solid and stable no matter which part of the boat you stand on. Its cabin roof and the balsa-cored carbon-fiber deck are so strong that the mast doesn't require any form of compression post. The self-draining cockpit is long enough and capable of sleeping at 6 feet 6 inches.

The Sage 17 may be expensive at $25k but is a true sea warrior that's worth look at. This is a boat that will not only serve you right but will also turn heads at the marina.    

{{boat-info="/boats/laserperformance-laser-sb3"}}

Having been chosen as the overall boat of the year for 2008 by the Sailing World Magazine, the Laser SB3 is one of the coolest boats you'll ever encounter. When sailing upwind, this boat will lock into the groove while its absolute simplicity is legendary. In terms of downwind sailing, having this boat will be a dream come true while it remains incredibly stable even at extraordinary speed.

Since its debut in 2004, the Laser SB3 has surged in terms of popularity thanks to the fact that it's designed to put all the controls at your fingertips. In addition to a lightweight mast, its T- bulb keel can be hauled and launched painlessly. For about $18,000, the Laser SB3 ushers you into the world of sports sailing and what it feels to own and use a sports boat.

{{boat-info="/boats/fareast-18"}}

As a manufacturer, Fareast is a Chinese boat manufacturer that has been around for less than two decades. But even with that, the Fareast 18 remains a very capable cruiser-racer that will take your sailing to the next level. In addition to its good looks, this boat comes with a retractable keel with ballast bulb, a powerful rig, and an enclosed cabin.

Its narrow design with a closed stern may be rare in sailboats of this size, but that's not a problem for the Fareast 18. This design not only emphasizes speed but also makes it a lot easier to maintain this boat. Perfect for about 6 people, this boat punches above its weight. It's, however, designed to be rigged and launched by one person.

This is a relatively affordable boat. It's agile, safe, well-thought-out, well built, and very sporty.

{{boat-info="/boats/chuck-paine-paine-14"}}

If you're in the market looking for a small sailboat that offers contemporary performance with classic beauty, the Paine 14 should be your ideal option. Named after its famous designer, Chuck Paine, this boat is intentionally designed after the classic Herreshoff 12.5 both in terms of dimensions and features.

This is a lightweight design that brings forth modern fin keel and spade rudder, which makes it agile, stable, and faster. The Paine 14 is built using cold-molded wood or west epoxy. It has varnished gunnels and transoms to give it an old-time charm. To make it somehow modern, this boat is designed with a carbon mast and a modern way to attach sails so that it's ready to sail in minutes.

You can rest easy knowing that the Paine 14 will not only serve you well but will turn heads while out there.

{{boat-info="/boats/wd-schock-lido-14"}}

Many sailors will attest that their first sailing outing was in a Lido 14. This is a classic sailboat that has been around for over four decades and still proves to be a perfect match to modern small boats, especially for those still learning the ropes of sailing.

With seating for six people, the Lido 14 can be perfect for solo sailing , single-handed sailing, or if you're planning for shorthanded sailing. While new Lido 14 boats are no longer available, go for a functional used Lido 14 and you'll never regret this decision. It will serve you well and your kids will probably fall in love with sailing if Lido 14 becomes their main vessel during weekends or long summer holidays.

Bottom Line

There you have it; these are some of the best small sailboats you can go for. While there are endless small sailboats in the market, the above-described sailboat will serve you right and make you enjoy the wind.

Choose the perfect sailboat, invest in it, and go out there and have some good fun!

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I've personally had thousands of questions about sailing and sailboats over the years. As I learn and experience sailing, and the community, I share the answers that work and make sense to me, here on Life of Sailing.

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Yacht Cruising Lifestyle

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Everything fun you can do from your yacht

20 Blue Water Cruising Catamarans Under $100k

October 13, 2021 by Martin Parker 1 Comment

roberto nickson OgS5t0IuoSQ unsplash 1 1024x683 - 20 Blue Water Cruising Catamarans Under $100k

The debate between single-hull sailboats and blue water catamarans has raged since the beginning of time, and it’s unlikely ever to end! Both types of yachts have dedicated followers who are unlikely to ever be swayed by the benefits of the other. A lot of this is based on misconceptions and the influences of the people around them, though. We recommend that if you’re considering a blue water catamaran, get in a few good hours of sailing through varied conditions before making a decision. 

What Makes Blue Water Catamarans Great for Cruising?

Stable platform s.

Bluewater catamarans offer fantastic stability, despite what you may hear from single-hull yacht owners. There’s no high lean angle when sailing into the wind and no need to strap everything down to prevent it from moving. Add to this little or no rolling when moored, and a catamaran is a lovely place to be.

Additional Space 

An excellent beam to length ratio is essential on bluewater catamarans, and a 40-foot yacht will usually have a 20-foot beam. That gives you a 20-foot bridge deck, plenty of space on the hulls, and even more space forward on the netting.

Cruising Speed

The amount of wet surface area on a catamaran is significantly reduced compared to a monohull yacht. Without the need for a prominent, heavy keel for ballast, the catamaran can easily outperform a single hull yacht.

Shallow Draft s

Shallow draft boats allow easy navigation through shallow waters and exceptional stability for maximum comfort. You are far less likely to make mistakes with tide height predictions when sailing on a cat. 

Enclosed Cockpit s

Bluewater catamarans virtually always have an enclosed cockpit. Not only does this shield you from the sun in winter, but the elements in winter making cruising far more comfortable.

Safety 

The enclosed cockpit makes sailing safer, plus of course, when you need to get out on the deck, the stable catamaran is not pitching and rolling.

Our Top Choices For Blue Water Catamarans Under $100,000

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Designed and built by Rajen Naidu, the Rayvin 30 is a 29.5-foot cruising catamaran built for comfort. With a draft of just one meter, there are few places you can’t go on the Rayvin. The hull is constructed of epoxy glass fiber, but carbon-kevlar has been used for added strength below the waterline.

Inside, you’ll find three cabins, plenty of space, and even a bath! These are great value blue water catamarans with excellent performance.

Prout Snowgoose 37

Photo Provided by: Gideon Fielding (Katamarans.com)

Probably one of the most well-known blue water catamarans available, the Snowgoose 37 was designed and built by Prout and Sons in the United Kingdom. With a displacement of 6 tons, this is not a light boat, but the 600 square feet sail area gives a healthy hull speed of up to 10 knots. Many people have completed a circumnavigation in a Snowgoose.

It has a cutter design, but the overhang is substantial, leaving it susceptible to bridge slam, particularly on a close reach.

Over 500 examples were built, with plenty available under the $100,000 mark.

Prout Quasar 50

Sticking with Prout, the Quasar 50 was the largest catamaran designed and built by the company. The company was still making the Quasar until its closure in 2020, so you can find plenty of examples.

Constructed with fiberglass, the cutter design has a displacement of 10 tons and a sail area of almost 1185 square feet, giving a maximum hull speed of around 14 knots.

It has to be said the Quasar is not a pretty boat, but it makes a perfect large cruiser.

Catalac 12M

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Catalac was a British boat building company owned by Tom Lack, hence the Catalac name. Over 600 examples of Catalac’s (9M, 10M, 11M, and 12M) were built. All around, they’re known as solid boats that handle well.

Designed as a sloop, the 12M displaces almost 9.3 tons. With a sail area of just 700 square feet, this cat offers a relatively slow hull speed of 9.5 knots.

An interesting point is the double thickness hulls, designed to withstand the North Sea weather.

Maldives 32

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The Maldives 32 is a more modern design by Joubert-Nivelt. It features a short overhang with a netting deck to avoid bridge slam, initially built by Fountaine Pajot in 1988. The Maldives has a light displacement of 3.3 tons thanks to the fiberglass and foam sandwich construction. Add in a sail area of 592 square feet, and the Maldives can cruise at up to 11 knots.

The Maldives 32 is an excellent basic boat readily available well under our $100,000 price point.

Edel Cat 33

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Thanks to the fiberglass construction, the Edel Cat 33 is another light boat, at just 3.6 tons and with a shallow draft of just 2.6 feet.

The Edel was designed by Yvonne Faulconnier and built by the Edel company in France, with the first bots being produced in 1985.

The 635 square feet of sail is enough for a good turn of speed for such a light boat without over-powering the hull.

A notable feature is the very short bridge hull, avoiding almost any bridge slam problems.

Endeavourcat 30

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Designed by Cortland Steck and built in America by the Endeavour Catamaran Corp, the Endeavourcat 30 is a lightweight 30-foot catamaran constructed using fiberglass with a foam core.

It has to be said; the Endeavourcat is not pretty, but you get a lot of space for your money. Another issue is the enclosed bridge deck, making this suitable for gentle cruising only.

The sloop-rigged catamaran is a good, reasonably priced starter boat for taking the first dip into blue water catamarans.

Island Packet Packet Cat 35

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If you are looking for comfort with a bit of style, then the Island Packet Cat 35 could be it. Designed by Robert K. Johnson and built in the USA by Island Packet, the Cat 35 makes the perfect boat for cruising the Keys.

The displacement of 6.25 tons gives the boat a solid, dependable feel, while the 2.6-foot draft allows you to explore water-restricted areas.

Inside there’re acres of room, but the fully enclosed bridge deck will cause issues in heavy weather.

Gemini 105MC

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The Gemini 105MC is a sloop-rigged boat designed by Tony Smith and built by Performance Cruising in the United States. It was in production for over 27 years, and they delivered over 1000 boats, so there are plenty available to suit most budgets.

An interesting design feature is a lifting centerboard, giving excellent stability when down but a draft of just 1.65 feet when lifted.

A displacement of 4 tons combined with 690 square feet of sail area gives the 105MC outstanding performance characteristics.

lagoon 380

With 760 examples of the Lagoon 380 produced, there are plenty on the market at reasonable prices. Built by Jeanneau, it is one of the most popular bluewater catamarans ever made.

The distinctive vertical windows offer maximum internal space, and it has a spacious interior, but the tradeoff is a displacement of 8 tons, so performance suffers a little. You can cruise comfortably at 7 knots, and with the short bridge deck, you won’t suffer too much bridge slam.

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If you can track down a Dean 365, it’s well worth a look. You can find these solidly built boats for $50,000 upwards. Designed by Peter Dean and built by his company, Dean Catamarans, they have an excellent reputation.

For a 36 foot boat, the 6-ton displacement is not light, but it does benefit from twin engines, and with the sloop rigging, it can sail downwind at up to 11 or 12 knots. With the genoa providing the main sailing power, sailing into the wind is not great.

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Sold as a self-build design, the Tiki 38 is a solid cruising catamaran designed by James Wharram. There are plenty available, but all will be different depending on the builder. With a displacement of around 6 tons, it’s not the lightest, and the cruising speed is about 5 or 6 knots.

With a ketch rig, using two 30-foot masts, the sail area is around 730 square feet, but you can also use a 530 spinnaker. The draft is shallow at 2.5 feet.

The Tiki makes an interesting – perhaps quirky choice.

Crowther Spindrift 40

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If you are more interested in performance than interior space, the Crowther Spindrift 40 could be an excellent choice. Designed by Lock Crowther, the Spindrift features narrow hulls, reducing the wet surface area and increasing your sailing speeds. The downside is a lack of space.

The sloop rigging gives you a total sail area of 791 square feet combined with a light 4-ton displacement, making the Spindrift excellent in light winds.

MacGregor 36

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Three hundred of the Roger Macgregor designed 36-foot boats were built, so there are plenty available. It’s built as a racing catamaran, so space is at a premium. There is only a trampoline between the two hulls, but the weight saving makes the displacement just 1.4 tons, and with the 534 square feet of sail, you can achieve speeds touching 28 knots.

Accommodation is restricted to the two hulls, but there are bunks for four people and a galley in the starboard hull.

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The Flica 36 was designed by Richard Wood is a proven design capable of crossing oceans. A displacement of 5 tons gives a good balance between speed and stability, and the cutter rigging allows for a main and two foresails.

The hulls have been made from ply and fiberglass, which accounts for the slightly heavier weight and strength. The bridge deck offers plenty of space with a small overhang but will suffer from bridge slam in heavier weather.

Mirage Yachts 37

Only a few of the open deck Mirage 37’s were produced, but consider them in your search. Designed by David Feltham and built by Thames Marine, the ketch-rigged boats are sturdy and safe.

At 7.3 tons, it’s heavy for a 36-foot cat, and the small sail area of just 548 square feet makes it slow, with a hull speed of only 7.4 knots. As a coastal cruiser, it certainly makes sense to give you a comfortable base for exploring.

Simpson 35 Wildside

The Simpson 35 Wildside is an excellent cruiser, with three double cabins, two of which are across the bridge deck. Roger Simpson is the designer, and he’s well known for his sturdy, reliable boats.

The Bermuda rigged sloop design features a fully covered bridge deck, so expect bridge slam if you sail in anything more than slight to moderate conditions. With a displacement of 5

tons, and a small sail area, the performance will never be exciting, but it’s okay for coastal cruising.

Gemini 3400

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The Gemini 3400 is the predecessor to the Gemini 105 mentioned earlier. If you can’t find a 105 at your price, then a 3400 is a good alternative. Although weighing the same as the 105, at four tons, the sail area is smaller at just 490 square feet, giving a reduced performance.

As with all Geminis, the 3400 features retractable centerboards for better tracking when on a close reach, without increasing the draft.

The 3400 was designed by Tony Smith and built by Performance Cruising in the US, who still produce catamarans now.

Seawind 850

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Originally built in Australia by Seawind Catamarans and designed by Scott Jutson, the 850 is a 28-foot cat featuring fractional sloop rigging. At a relatively light displacement of 2.4 tons, the 350 square feet of sail gives good performance and comfortable cruising.

The short bridge deck overhang is filled with a trampoline, allowing the 850 to sail in rougher weather without too much bridge slam. The Seawind makes an excellent cruiser despite its 28-foot LOA.

Aventura 23.5

Our last catamaran is the smallest in the review. The Aventura 235 is just 23 feet long, has a light displacement of only 0.77 tons, and a sail area of 312 square feet. Two cabins offer four berths despite its diminutive size, making it a comfortable cruiser for a small family.

There are, of course, compromises, with just a single outboard engine on the centerline, and internal space is limited. But with its lightweight design, easy handling, and shallow draft of 1.8 feet, it is a perfect first step into catamaran ownership.

Blue Water Catamarans Are a Fantastic Budget Option

Remember: When buying a bluewater cruising yacht for less than $100,000, compromise is inevitable. 

The best advice for buying a boat is to be truly honest with yourself by defining your needs and separating them from your desires. 

Need more advice on buying great blue water catamarans? Get a conversation started on our community forum by leaving a question or comment!

If you found this article helpful, please leave a comment below, share it on social media, and subscribe to our email list., for direct questions and comments, shoot me an email at [email protected].

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July 2, 2022 at 2:52 pm

Surprised you don’t list the PDQ 32.

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  • River Cruising

GCT Moscow to St. Petersburg have you done it?

By relevart , January 25, 2006 in River Cruising

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Cool Cruiser

This is my first time with GCT and I was very disappointed when they said they were substituting a WWII memorial and Victory Park tour for a tour of the Kremlin and Armory Museum. We can take the Kremlin Armory tour for $60.00. The War Memorial and Victory Park tour was originally $45.00. They say it is because people didn't like the Kremlin and Armory Museum tour. It looks like a bait and switch to me. I can't imagine people not wanting to visit the Kremlin and Armory. If any of you have done this cruise I would be curious what you thought about these tours.

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We took the GCT Russian cruise two years ago. I would not go to Moscow without going inside the Kremlin and the Armory. I don't understand droping that tour from the trip.

We're on the GCT Moscow/St. Petersburg September 6th cruise and have gotten the notification about the tour changes. We were going to do both anyway, so it's just a higher cost.

Anyone else going on this date?

Believe me, no matter what do take the Kremlin tour. If you have no other possibility, I can recommend an excellent local guide for you. I am a Cruise/Tour Director for AVALON and we will have the Kremlin Armory included and this would never be replaced for something else, UNLESS there is an official event going on in the Kremlin on the date you are there. This is the only possibility. The Kremlin regularly closes the doors without good reason (visit of a foreign dignitary or so).

Check this with Granc Circle (that is your cruise company am I right?)

Thank you Heintje. If you could give me the local guide info if he is able to pick us up at the boat I would be grateful. My e-mail address is [email protected] . All the Grand Circle tours have been switched from the Kremlin so I don't know what the problem is.

The name of the guide is IRA, She has been my local guide several times, and is specialized in Kremlin and Armory (also the treasury). She is prefered guide for individual guests of some of Moscows top hotels. Her e-mail address is:[email protected]

When you write her, you can mention that you received her name and address through me: Hendrik Jan from Holland.

I will sent a copy of this message to your e-mail address.

Good luck and let me know if you managed to get in touch with her; [email protected]

  • 4 weeks later...

I am becoming less and less enamored with GCT as time goes on. I sent my Russian visa application to the agency GCT recommended the middle of January, after I called them and asked if I could send it early because I have a 31 day cruise on Orient Lines beginning 3/11. They said yes. Weekly calls and e-mails with promises to get it to me have not been much help. Finally, this week they said it would not be approved until the middle of March because GCT Russia is holding them up, I told them I had sent it to them early because I had an earlier cruise. So, for USD$100 they say I can get it back by March 1. When I e-mailed GCT they said that is why they sent out the Visa application so early. It looks to me like it doesn’t matter when they sent it out but GCT Russia is not going to send the applications in until the middle of March. I was also told by the agency that once the application is approved it would take two weeks for the Embassy in DC to put the Visa in the passport. If I miss my 31 day cruise I will not be happy and it is off to an attorney as I have done everything I can possibly do.

Roses2

You may want to read the thread on the Frommers site about Grand Circle and their loss of Better Business Bureau Certification.

We have had both good and bad expeiences with GCT. Better to be informed.

http://www.frommers.com/cgi-bin/WebX...2Ft^[email protected]

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

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The best bluewater multihulls of all time: a complete guide

  • Toby Hodges
  • October 6, 2021

Toby Hodges and François Tregouet consider the best bluewater multihulls and look at the options for sailing the oceans in spacious comfort

small fast cruising catamaran

What are the best bluewater multihulls for long term cruising? The one you own, or the one you can afford is the simple answer.

There is a wealth of proven designs to suit bluewater sailing and a variety of budgets. While we have focussed here on the best bluewater multihulls in production, we’ve also included some cracking pedigree multihulls which tour the planet and might occasionally pop up on the brokerage market.

If you can afford to, then pushing towards the 45-50ft length will buy you space, pace and that extra payload capacity needed to take all the items you’d want on your home afloat.

When looking at the best bluewater multihulls, the choice will come down to that perennial balance between comfort/space and speed/weight. Choosing a lighter weight performance design will obviously help you cover distance voyages more rapidly and potentially allow you to outrun weather systems. It means you can sail faster, with less sail up and less load and stress. But you’ll have to sacrifice some luxuries and need to be quite scrupulous about keeping weight down and centralised in order to maintain high average speeds.

For the majority of cruisers, however, it is the amount of space multihulls offer once you’ve reached your destination that really appeals. As well as the non-heeling living area and real estate they provide, they’re well suited to typical tradewind sailing .

If you’re considering your first or next multihull, we hope the following will serve as a taster.

Best bluewater multihulls for performance cruising

Outremer 51/55.

When you think of multihulls designed for bluewater cruising, Outremer will likely be one of the first names that comes to mind. Its heritage lies in building catamarans that can sail fast and are built strong enough to do laps of the globe.

The 51, the current version of which launched three years ago, is an archetypal example of what to look for in terms of blending speed and space is a dream design for a family circumnavigation.

The French yard’s new 55ft VPLP design may look boldly different from its past models, but the philosophy behind it remains the same. It is designed to match windspeed up to 12 knots and Outremer reasons that its ability to sail in 5 knots of breeze will allow it to sail for 95% of the time on a circumnavigation.

Read more about the Outremer 51 and Outremer 55.

small fast cruising catamaran

Photo: Diego Yriarte

Seawind 1600/1370

For nearly four decades the Australian Seawind brand and its founder Richard Ward have been gearing catamarans around safe bluewater sailing, including performance, protection and ease of handling. Its Reichel Pugh-designed 1600, which launched three years ago, is an elegant looking cat with relatively low, long lines and some smart solutions for fast bluewater sailing.

Seawind also launches its new 1370 later this year, a staggering 60 of which have sold on plans alone.

This first 50 is built from a composite sandwich of basalt fibre, a cloth made from volcanic rock, and PET foam from recycled plastic bottles, which helps to reduce carbon emissions by nearly 50% when compared with traditional glassfibre methods.

This new 50 footer is perhaps a more appealing and practical prospect than Rapido’s previous 60 (with its significant fixed beam), particularly as the amas on this new model can fold to reduce beam to 18ft.

Infused carbon foam sandwich construction is used, along with beams, daggerboards and rudder in pre-preg carbon to keep displacement to 8,200kg.

Read more about the Rapido 50

This OC50 is designed as a more affordable cruising alternative, than the HH models which have preceeded it. This model targets ocean sailing.

It’s still stiffened and strengthened by carbon, but built in vinylester composites with a gelcoat finish. This adds an additional 300kg or so over a full carbon HH50, but cost savings are in the region of $400,000.

Read more about the HH OC50

Balance 526

The 526 launched four years ago, designed to suit short-handed sailors and families looking to sail long distances, hence it can carry large payloads and promises easy maintenance. It looks good too.

Berman’s Versahelm design is a key feature. The wheel cantilevers, allowing the helmsman to steer from outboard with clear sightlines or from the hardtop protection of the aft cockpit.

small fast cruising catamaran

Photo: Christopher White

Atlantic 47

The A47 suits short-handed fast ocean sailing at an approachable size. Lengthening it to 49ft allowed for an aft cockpit. It is available as a sloop or with White’s patented MastFoil ketch rig – rotating aerofoil masts designed for easy short-handed cruising without sacrificing performance.

Read more about the Atlantic 47

A combination of sharp design from François Perus and high build quality brings plenty of appeal to this sporty Italian-built cat. The first example launched three years ago with a light displacement of 10.5 tonnes, thanks to an E-glass epoxy-infused build with carbon strengthening. The yard offers semi-custom construction and full hybrid packages.

Catana 53/Ocean class 50

Catana’s performance model from 2017, sports twin aft helms (which may not suit ocean sailors), reverse bows and carbon daggerboards. The high topsides help create good bridgedeck clearance and plenty of accommodation. Its new Ocean Class 50 seems more in the shipyard’s bluewater DNA. The light weight, and dynamic and modern shape with slim hulls and a relatively short nacelle suggests a seaworthy nature and high speeds.

Read more about the Catana 53

Best bluewater multihulls for pedigree performance

Veteran multihull designers Morrelli & Melvin designed this smaller model for the Gunboat range. It was built to be more manageable for an owner-driver yet still capable of up to 300-400 mile days.

The Gunboat 48 is something of a rare breed, just six 48s were built between 2004 and 2009. Oh, to have a spare €1.3m right now… one of them is actually on the market.

Read more about the Gunboat 48

At the start of the Millennium, Catana offered fully equipped boats as standard for long distance cruising. The Catana 471 or 472 (one or two helms respectively), represented at the time the optimum in ocean-going catamarans.

Chincogan/Lightwave

Tony Grainger has been drawing fast multihulls for 35 years, including racing trimarans and the Lightwave and Chincogan cruisers. The popular Lightwave 38 has admirable performance and comfort, and the Chincogan 52 (pictured) has the length to clock high average speeds.

Outremer 45 G. Danson

With its characteristic roof, narrow hulls and daggerboards, the Outremer 45 is a standout design which has become somewhat iconic. Despite a rather spartan interior, it has been a great success with fast cruising enthusiasts. On board, family ocean crossings at an average of 10 knots are the norm.

Best bluewater multihulls for family cruising

small fast cruising catamaran

Photo: Nicolas Claris

The Lagoon 450 remains the most popular model in Lagoons already popular range. It exemplifies the VPLP/Nauta design partnership which has made these the very definition of modern mid-size cruising catamarans which can appeal to families and charterers alike.

Indeed the 450 marked the modern look of Lagoon and was the first with interior styling from Nauta. It originally launched over a decade ago as a flybridge design with central helming position (450F), before this ‘sport top’ option (450S) was offered with a starboard helm station and lower boom.

Read more about the Lagoon 450

small fast cruising catamaran

Photo: Guilain Grenier

Fountaine Pajot Saona 47

The 47 has a modern shape, with straight bows and a reverse sheer line. It incorporates significant volume in the hulls below the bridgedeck to create room for the optional athwartships cabins. Cabin space is a prime selling point, particularly the owner’s suite to port, where there is also abundant natural light and headroom.

small fast cruising catamaran

Photo: Tui Marine

Leopard Catamarans, together with designer Simonis Voogd and builder Robertson and Caine, produce the archetypal dual-purpose owner-operator or charter boat in their modern catamaran range.

Key features of the 45 are the amount of light in the saloon and the incredible volume and space on offer in the cabins above the relatively narrow waterlines. Vast social living areas include the flybridge, saloon and dual cockpits.

Read more about the Leopard 45

small fast cruising catamaran

Photo: www.jfromero.fr

Nautitech Open/Fly 46

During the 1990s and noughties Nautitech earned a good reputation for its elegant catamarans. The 441 is a timeless example and the 44 can be credited with the ongoing trend in hardtop biminis. While its acquisition by Bavaria seven years ago helped Nautitech implement industrial build techniques, the French brand has retained its DNA at its Rochefort sur Mer yard.

The modern Marc Lombard designs have tall rigs with generous square-top mainsails. Twin wheels in the aft quarters of the Open 46 offer a direct feel on the helm, however those spending long periods in the tropics may prefer the shade of the bimini-equipped flybridge option. The layout is also open, with a saloon more outside than in. Styling is clean, modern and simple, and the standard of build and finish are good.

small fast cruising catamaran

Photo: Olivier Blanchet

First impressions of the Neel 51 are sure to centre on its sheer size and space inside. But as you’ll see from our review of the Neel 43 on page 83, when you sail one overriding impressions quickly centre on its performance.

These trimarans are becoming a popular mass production-built option.

small fast cruising catamaran

Photo: Christophe Launay

The Excess 11 packs plenty of potential as the smallest yacht offered by the big production yards. A little like the Lagoon 380 of old, it presents a good value new entry-level boat for genuine cruising in a more sporty, modern and enticing design. Some may argue against aft helms for ocean sailing, but those coming from monohulls will appreciate the more direct steering they offer.

Broadblue 385S

Broadblue is a UK brand which offers a distinct line of cruising and Rapier performance catamarans. Its staple 385 packs a lot of cruising comfort into its length, including generous tankage, and has been sailed all over the world. Broadblue built its first electric drive catamaran 12 years ago and offers the only all-electric production sailing catamaran under 40ft in Europe.

small fast cruising catamaran

Photo: Christophe Breschi

Bali Catspace

For those looking for maximum volume within 40ft, it’ll be hard to beat the Catspace – although it is more of a holiday apartment than a traditional bluewater cruiser. Bali’s garage style sliding aft door does help offer an enormous amount of enclosed (or open) living space.

Best bluewater multihulls for luxury cruising

small fast cruising catamaran

Photo: Nico Krauss

Privilège 510 Signature

The 510 is designed to take a serious amount of cruising gear – up to six tonnes of it in fact. The excellent helm station now has a fixed windscreen and all lines lead to hand. Finish quality including the electrical installation is first class and Privilege’s trademark, an admirable full beam (26ft) forward cabin, is sumptuous.

small fast cruising catamaran

Photo: Jérôme Houyvet

Garcia Explocat 52

Garcia Yachts has cornered the market for series-built aluminium monohulls and multihulls in the last decade and this new Explocat 52 is sparking real interest. We ran a full test report in our February issue, describing it as a go-anywhere cat with an enticing combination of space, pace and rugged construction.

Read our review of the Garcia Explocat 52

Built in Argentina, the Antares 44 is the ultimate evolution of a model launched 21 years ago. Entirely dedicated to bluewater cruising, it is the yard’s only model and is constantly being improved according to owner feedback.

Time seems to have no hold on this boatyard and, against the trend, the standard equipment of the Antares 44 is extremely complete

small fast cruising catamaran

Photo: Richard Langdon

Discovery Bluewater 50

This luxury Bill Dixon design may be a decade old now and into its third iteration, but the concept behind its original appeal remains. For those used to sailing high-end thoroughbred monohulls, here is an option to consider for a comparative level of build quality and fit out when moving to a multihull.

Read more about the Discovery Bluewater 50

St Francis 50 MKII

With this latest version of its original model, this experienced South African builder has optimised a catamaran cut out for the unforgiving seas of the Indian Ocean and the South Atlantic. The MKII allows for an increased load capacity, an important point in long distance cruising.

Xsquisite X5

Intelligent features on the X5 include the protected helm station with glass windscreen, integrated rainwater catcher, UV-protective glass and generous tankage.

Best bluewater multihulls for size & speed

Mcconaghy mc52.

The MC50 (now MC52) was the first and promises some high speed sailing, but it’s the open plan main living deck which will attract the majority. It incorporates an intelligent centreboard system, which hardly affects interior space, but arguably its exposed helms at the aft end of the flybridge will not suit serious ocean cruising.

small fast cruising catamaran

Photo: Florian H. Talles

HH in Xiamen is building some really impressive large, luxury fast cats up to 90ft. This was its second model to launch, a high-end, high performance Morelli & Melvin design capable of rapid passagemaking speeds and enjoyable regatta sailing. Features include C-shaped boards and central or aft helms.

small fast cruising catamaran

Photo: Mike Jones/Waterline Media

Ocean Explorer 60

If Nautor’s Swan made catamarans, they may look like this… The Ocean Explorer 60 uses the same designer in German Frers and some of the same builders who worked at the famous Finnish yard to produce this world cruiser. The resultant quality shines through. A new OE72 is due soon.

Kinetic KC54

A young company with plenty of experience, Kinetic produces custom fast ocean cruisers, which can occasionally race. Its 62 is a serious performance vessel with carbon hulls, rigs and rigging, daggerboards or centreboards. With fast bluewater cruising the goal, carbon is used to minimise weight so features/toys can still be added. The swim platform and hardware on the newly launched 54 weighs just 90kg, and the generous sized tanks are all in carbon too. Views from the saloon and forward cockpit also look special.

Best bluewater multihulls for ultimate performance

Marsaudon ts4/orc 42.

Few catamaran builders produce genuine performance cruisers at this ‘smaller’ size: this one is kept minimalist and light weight (around 6 tonnes) – the yard’s philosophy is ‘simplicity, then add lightness.’ The 42 is a cruiser-racer with the ability to outpace most yachts across the Atlantic, win a regatta and still offer some space for island hopping. Standard tankage is minimal however. Marsaudon recently rebranded its TS range to Ocean Rider Catamarans (ORCs) and has an ORC 57 in build.

Dazcat 1495

Dazcat builds fast, seaworthy cats from its Multihull Centre in Cornwall. The 1495 is a true ocean cruiser-racer, which is stiff and rewarding to sail, with direct steering linked to carbon rudders. The 1495 can hit 20+ knot speeds with relative ease, but it is the consistent high average speeds which will attract those looking to cover serious miles. Weight is centralised including engines, tanks, and systems all located amidships to help reduce pitching. Dazcat has a semi-custom build approach and creates all sorts of weird and wonderful craft for all abilities.

Dragonfly 40

Dragonfly trimarans are known for their high quality construction and ability to delight sailors with their ease of planing speeds. For those who can live without the space of similar length cats, the new flagship 40 is large enough to offer cruising space, while folding outriggers and retractable appendages mean you can dry out where others wouldn’t dare.

Looping 45/Freydis 48

These two designs by Erik Lerouge both offer a high-performance vision of ocean cruising. The Loopings were built individually and the Freydis in small series, and on both you can sail as fast as the wind in complete safety. Interior quality depends on whether finished by an amateur or by a shipyard.

Swisscat 48

An attractive combination of luxury, comfort and performance, the S48 is a stiff, go-anywhere premium cat that is easy to manage single-handed. The lightweight build (11t) is in epoxy infusion with carbon reinforcement.

Schionning Designs

Jeff Schionning has catamaran design in his blood. His designs exude performance and seaworthiness with flowing, even aerodynamic lines. On all tradewind routes you’ll find a G-Force (models from 12m to 23m) or an Arrow (12m to 15m) sailing more quickly than the rest. His latest venture is with Current Marine in Knysna, South Africa.

Best bluewater multihulls for pedigree cruising

The long-time best-seller from the world leader in catamarans, with more than 1,000 produced over almost 20 years from 1999. With its characteristic vertical windows, the 380 and its big brother the 410 made the purists scream when they were presented. But the 380 proved a pioneer of its kind. Safe bow volumes and light displacement (7,260 kg) helped its seaworthy behaviour. The high number of boats on the market makes this the most affordable bluewater cruising multihull for its size, even if price range is as wide as condition is variable.

Casamance 44/46

Between 44ft and 46ft depending on the year of construction and the length of its transoms, the Casamance was an impressive catamaran on launch in 1985. The design by Joubert/Nivelt offered good volume and load capacity. Of the 490 units produced, many joined the charter fleets. The exterior of the Casamance is dated, but the interior in grey ceruse oak has retained plenty of charm.

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Small Cathedral - Kazan Cathedral

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  • Russia    
  • Central Russia    
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  • Kazan Cathedral

Especially in summer. Me and my wife visited it in September, on a weekday. It was rather empty in... read more

small fast cruising catamaran

You may know that this church is not the original one, as it was destroyed during Stalin’s... read more

small fast cruising catamaran

Small Cathedral

Another reconstructed building destroyed by Stalin, the Cathedral of Our Lady of Kazan" its a small church in the middle of the Red Square. In the past, was considered one of the most important churches in all Moscow with demonstration starting here with the Tsar and the Bishop of the Church. Now a days, its regularly visited by the local community and many curious tourists, since there is no entrance fee. The place is very quiet with many nice frescos to admire but besides that its just another place to move quickly with so much to see around. In my opinion, just the mandatory picture from outside.

small fast cruising catamaran

Its a nice church, in the Red Square! More beautiful outside then inside! Enter it, its free! Beside that, nothing out of the ordinary

A beautiful church, full of icons and fresco. A must see in Moscow, to understand the Russian soul. Please take time to see the details.

You will most likely see this church if you are on Red Square. We did not enter the building as there was a mass going on when we wanted to go in, but it is beautiful on the outside.

small fast cruising catamaran

Opposite Kremlin walls, Kazan Cathedral seem small. Walk up the stairs and get in. No fee. A mass was performing with its women choir. So atmospheric. Bought a candle and at tented the mass. Women on the left with their heads covered, men on the right with no hats. The temple is magnificent . The scent from censer and voices takes you back on time. So emotional place.

Since you`re already in the Red Square, worth a visit inside! It is small, very cute and, like all the russian churches, amazing inside...

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    The Outremer 4x is a stable and comfortable high-speeding cruising catamaran that performs ocean crossings and confronts any weather with remarkable ease. Named the European Boat of the Year in 2017, this 48-foot (14.6 m) bluewater cruiser sails faster than wind speed and attains maximum cruising speeds of 20 knots.. The 4x is an upgrade of the extremely popular Outremer 45, thus retaining ...

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    The smallest cruising/liveaboard sailing catamaran is the Smart Cat S280. With a length overall of 27.9 feet (8.5 meters), it offers the most economical and spacious living area you can find on any liveaboard catamaran today. In this article, I'll talk about the Smart Cat S280, and then ill show you alternatives.

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    Small sailing catamarans are multi-hulled boats that offer stability, speed, and ease of handling. They typically have two parallel hulls connected by a platform and are designed for recreational or racing purposes. Popular among sailors due to their maneuverability and shallow draft, they are suitable for both inland and coastal waters.

  13. New catamarans: 2021's most exciting launches

    The first CM46 is a full carbon racing version destined for an Auckland-based owner and is due to launch early 2021. The second boat (for Wadhams) has a more cruising-oriented spec. Prices ex VAT ...

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    The Beneteau Oceanis 30.1. The Beneteau Oceanis 30.1, a 31-foot-3-inch tiny yacht that was best-equipped and spec'd out as a specialized cruising boat, was also given the title of Best Performance Cruiser for 2020. But don't be fooled by her modest internal amenities; she is a lively small ship.

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    jlodrummer Catalina Yachts are synonymous with bigger boats but they have some great and smaller boats too such as Catalina 16.5. This is one of the best small sailboats that are ideal for family outings given that it has a big and roomy cockpit, as well as a large storage locker.

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    While cruising through the 80-mile (128-kilometer) Moscow Canal, you'll get your first glimpse of rural Russia on your way to Uglich. ... which may be small but has extraordinary churches linked to the tsars. Choice of A visit to Saint Cyrill on the White Lake Monastery-OR- Goritsy "Village Day" Later, relax onboard as your ship cruises ...

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