Sportfishing Buddy

Where Is The Best Place To Mount A Transducer? (Top 5 Locations)

UPDATED 03 NOVEMBER 2023

by Robert Ceran

Are you wondering where to mount your fish finder transducer?

As you probably know, it’s essential to install your transducer correctly in order to get good performance from it.

Table of Contents

But choosing the right location to mount a transducer is more complicated than most people anticipate, since each location comes with its own set of challenges and pros and cons.

Where to mount transducer on boat

In this article we’ll go over the 5 best places to mount a transducer on a boat, and what you need to know in order to choose the right location for your transducer. 

Where to mount a transducer on a boat

The top five transducer mounting locations on a boat are:

  • Transom mount
  • Trolling motor mount
  • In-hull mount
  • Thru hull mount

Out of these five transducer placement options, the most commonly used ones by far are transom and trolling motor mounts, though the other three can also be great options for specific situations and applications. 

When choosing the right transducer mounting location, it’s important to keep in mind that all of these options come with their own pros and cons, and you should weigh these carefully before choosing the right one for your purposes.

Photo of Stern Pad screwless transducer mounting kit

Screwless transducer mounting kit

installing transducer on sailboat

Pad for mounting your transducer without screwing into the boat hull.

Where to mount transducer on transom

Now let’s talk about choosing the best transom mount transducer location, since this is one of the most commonly used places to mount a transducer on a boat. 

Unfortunately, many anglers choose an incorrect transducer placement on the transom, and as a result they experience problems with their sonar imaging.

That’s why it’s so important to get the transducer placement right in order to achieve the best results.

What is the best transom mount transducer location?

It’s essential to mount your transducer in an area of the transom that doesn’t have any turbulence, since even a little turbulence can negatively impact the quality of your sonar image. 

Diagram showing ideal transom mount tranducer location

This means you should avoid areas with turbulent water flow aft of rivets, strakes, or ribs in the hull. Choose a transducer placement spot on the transom where the hull in front of this location is flat and smooth.

Also, make sure that the transducer is at least 15 inches away from the propeller of your outboard motor, and check whether the outboard can rotate fully in all directions without bumping into the transducer (which needs to be checked in the fully trimmed position). 

What is the best transducer mounting height?

The best transducer mounting height is at the bottom edge of the transom, with the lower surface of the transducer protruding about 1/32 to 1/16 inches below the bottom of the boat.

It’s important to avoid mounting the transducer too high on the transom, since this will cause it to be out of the water at planing speed (keep in mind that the water level of the transom drops when the boat is on plane). 

If you mount your transducer too high on the transom, this will still allow it to function at slow speeds under 2 to 3 mph. But as soon as the boat gets faster than that, the transducer will stop working. 

Diagram showin ideal transducer mounting height

Secondly, you also want to avoid the transducer being too low on the transom, as that will trigger turbulence and rooster tail formation, which also negatively affects the quality of sonar imaging. 

So the ideal transducer mounting height on the transom is with the bottom surface of the transducer just slightly protruding below the bottom of the boat (see diagram above). 

How far should a transducer be in the water?

The transducer placement needs to be deep enough so that its piezoelectric crystals are fully covered by water.

This can be accomplished even if the top of the transducer is flush with the water level, but if its crystals are out of the water, the sonar can’t function, and you won’t get an image. 

One thing you need to keep in mind is that the water level of the transom goes down at planing speed, and if your transducer is mounted too high, the crystals will be out of the water when you’re going fast.  

Should the transducer be flush with the bottom of the boat?

No, it’s actually better if the bottom edge of the transducer protrudes by about 1/32 to 1/16 inch below the bottom of the boat.

This is just enough to ensure that it is covered by water even at planing speed, but not low enough to trigger turbulence and rooster tail formation.

If the transducer is flush with the bottom of the boat, it will still work at slower speed, but not at high speeds. 

Can you mount a transducer too low?

Yes, if you mount a transducer too low, it will trigger turbulence and air bubble formation around the transducer, as well as rooster tail formation behind the transducer.

This turbulence decreases the quality of the sonar imaging, especially when your boat is planing at higher speed. 

What side of the boat do you mount a transducer?

A transducer should be mounted on the side of the boat with the downstroke of the outboard propeller, which is usually on the starboard side.

An easy way to check this for your boat is to observe the direction of rotation of your propeller. If it’s clockwise, then your transducer placement should be on the starboard side, but if it’s anti-clockwise, then the transducer should be on the port side. 

The side of the transom with the downward stroke of the prop has less turbulence than the side with the upward stroke, which is why it is the best transducer mounting location. 

Where to mount a transducer on trolling motor

The best place to mount a transducer on a trolling motor depends on the type of transducer you’re using.

A forward facing transducer (such as LiveScope, Active Target , or MEGA Live) should be mounted on the shaft of the trolling motor, as that gives it an unobstructed view in the forward direction.

The great thing about this type of transducer mount is that it will automatically point your transducer in the same direction as the trolling motor.

However, you can also achieve this with a trolling motor barrel mount if the transducer is placed on the side of the lower compartment.

If you want to mount a 2D or down imaging transducer on your trolling motor, the best way to do this is with a barrel mount, which uses a circular mounting bracket that fits around the lower compartment of the trolling motor.

This mounting location is ideal for pointing the transducer downwards without obstructing its view.

The best locations to mount different types of transducers

Now let’s take a closer look at different types of transducers, and the best mounting locations for each of them.

Where to mount a side imaging transducer

The best location to mount a side imaging transducer is at the transom, since that usually allows its sonar beams to shoot sideways in both directions while you’re driving the boat around, which enables you to scout large areas of water to both sides without having to slow down.

But when mounting a side imaging transducer on the transom, you need to take care that you put it in a spot where it isn’t blocked on one side by the outboard motor when it is fully trimmed down.

Where to mount a down imaging transducer

The best location to mount a down imaging transducer is either the transom, or the trolling motor.

Which transducer placement is best for you depends on whether you plan to use the down imaging while you’re driving around (in which case a transom mount is best), or while you’re fishing (in which case a trolling motor mount is best).

If you mount your transducer on your trolling motor, the best option is a barrel mount, since that allows you to position it at the very bottom and pointing downwards with an unobstructed view.

Finally, Humminbird offers several thru hull down imaging transducers that you can mount inside your boat without drilling a hole.

This option is great if you want to use down imaging to scan the water below while driving around with your boat at planing speed. 

Where to mount a LiveScope transducer

The best location to mount a LiveScope transducer is on the shaft of your  trolling motor, which is ideal for a forward facing sonar. This also holds true for other brands of live sonar, including Lowrance Active Target or Humminbird MEGA Live . 

However, an alternative option is to use a transducer mounting pole , which was specifically designed for live sonars, and can be positioned at the front of your boat similar to a trolling motor.

The nice thing about using a transducer mounting pole is that you can point your transducer in different directions independently of the trolling motor, simply by rotating the handle of the mounting pole.

The same mounting locations that are ideal for live sonar transducers are also a great choice for Humminbird 360 or Mega 360 transducers.

Where to mount an in-hull transducer

The best place to mount an In-hull transducer is as close as possible to the centerline of the hull and towards the aft end, since this part of the hull remains in contact with the water even at high speed.

If mounted correctly, this transducer location will allow you to get high quality sonar readings at high speed with an in-hull transducer.

But keep in mind that in-hull transducers can only be used on fiberglass boats, since fiberglass has sonar characteristics that are similar to water, which enables an in-hull transducer to shoot its sonar beam through the hull. 

When choosing the right location to mount an in-hull transducer, choose an area that has no ribs, rivets, or other protrusions on the outside of the hull, in order to avoid water turbulence.

You also need to avoid locations with cables or other sources of interference. 

Where to mount a thru hull transducer

The best place for mounting a thru hull transducer is as close as possible to the centerline of the hull and towards the aft of the boat.

Choosing an aft midship transducer placement ensures that the transducer will be in contact with water even when planing at high speed.

Also, if you have an inboard motor, make sure that the thru hull transducer is mounted forward of the propeller.

Where to mount a transducer on a pontoon boat

The best place to mount a transducer is at the bottom edge of the bracket at the back end on one of the pontoon tubes.

Since pontoon boats are built on top of pontoon tubes, they don’t have a transom like other boat types, and so require a different using a different location to mount a transducer.

When mounting the transducer, make sure that it is just under the water line, and parallel to the water surface.

If your cockpit is on the starboard side, it’s a good idea to mount the transducer on the same side, to make it easier to run a cable to the cockpit.

And when you lay down the cable, make sure to keep it away from any other wires or electronic devices that can cause interference.

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Install A Transducer Without Holes Below The Waterline

Advertisement

Two ways to install a transducer that won't compromise your hull.

Transducer illustration

Installing a transom-mounted transducer on a piece of Starboard that is thru-bolted above the waterline prevents transom rot from occurring.

Method 1: Substitute Transom

There are alternatives to drilling a hole in your bottom for a transducer. Transom-mount transducers are common on smaller boats, but the mounting screw holes can allow water in, causing rot in the transom core. Even careful sealing will eventually fail because of the stress of running on plane. A better option uses a piece of "plastic wood" such as structural grade Starboard as a mounting point. Cut a piece long enough to extend from the bottom of the transom to a point at least six inches above the waterline, and several inches wider than the mount. Thru-bolt it to the transom using four stainless bolts. All holes should be well above the waterline and fit the bolts snugly. Dry fit everything, carefully following depth finder instructions, to be sure you've got the right fit and positioning.

Seal the transom core inside the bolt holes with epoxy resin. Use a syringe to inject the resin into the hole and a Q-tip or toothbrush to spread it around inside. Do this immediately before you insert the bolts. Seal and "glue" the board to the transom with 3M 5200 applied over the back of the board. The bottom edge of the board should be approximately 1/4- inch above the bottom of the boat and far enough above the bottom of the hull to avoid turbulence. Taper the bottom edge of the board, making it parallel to the surface of the water when running on plane. Mounting screw holes in the board now shouldn't puncture the transom; you'll have room for mistakes and the ability to add different transducers later.

— Tom Neale

Method 2: Shoot Through The Hull

If the bottom of your hull is solid fiberglass, meaning not cored, you can shoot through the hull by mounting a transducer inside the boat. I'm not a fan of epoxying a transducer directly to the inside of the hull, although it's definitely the easiest. I prefer to mount the transducer in a plastic pipe, then fix the pipe to the hull.

Fit a piece of plastic pipe to the hull where you want the transducer mounted. Put a wire brush on your drill and clean/ roughen the hull where the pipe will attach. Mount the transducer in the pipe in the same orientation you'd have it if it were hanging off the transom. Seal the mounting holes with the 5200. Leave a half-inch or so between transducer and hull.

Transducer mount

A cottage cheese or yogurt container can make a nice bath for a shoot-through transducer if you don't have PVC pipe handy.

Swab the place of pipe attachment liberally with acetone. When dry, use 5200 to fix the pipe to the hull. Fill the pipe with water or antifreeze and you're done. If you want to keep the water/antifreeze in the pipe from evaporating, drip enough hot wax on the liquid in the pipe to seal it. I don't bother with the wax; I use water and only need to refill it once a season. Don't like the spot? Tear up the pipe, clean up the 5200 on the hull with the wire brush, and try another place.

— Jeff Nicolas

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installing transducer on sailboat

Glue/stick on transducer mounting plate

m089221

m089221 Monday at 12:27 PM in This Old Boat

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installing transducer on sailboat

So I have to mount my transducer on the project boat which is an aluminum 22ft Sylvan converted offshore model.  Would be nice not to have to drill holes in the transom.  Anyone have any experience with the different types of stick and peel or epoxy glue on style transducer mounting plates?  I'm looking to mount an Airmar P66 to the boat and one of these mounting plates depending on the responses I get.  Thanks everyone.     

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Shakemsam

Not exactly what you are looking for....I mounted a piece of  poly board with 4 screws sealed with 5200, and mounted my transrucers to that.

AnglingAddict

AnglingAddict

I would mechanically fasten and then seal with lifecaulk, or 4200  - have done it a million times and you won't have any issues with water intrusion and its solid.  Both LIfecaulk and 4200 are rated for below waterline applications.  Do not use cheap silicone or caulk from Lowes...

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Traveling Circus

I've used Stern Savers on a couple of aluminum boats without any problems. 9 years for the one, 11 for the other. 

Sk8man

The mounting plate is definitely the way to go two holes and sealed with the above mentioned calk and never look back. Twenty two years on mine and still great. An upside to it is also the option to either move the transducer for better positioning, or to add other transducers etc. in the future.

Cat Power

Take a look at a product called Stern Pad, it is made by Seaworthy Innovations (made in the USA).  It is exactly what you are wanting.  

No holes in your boat

Pad has a 3M VHB Adhesive.  It won't come off 

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installing transducer on sailboat

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How to Select, Install and Use Marine LEDs

  • By Jim Hendricks
  • May 27, 2024

Underwater light turned on for fishing

Energy-efficient technologies are revolutionizing industrial, residential and automotive markets, but they ­also benefit today’s boaters. No energy-saving advancement has proven more poignant to boaters than LED lights. The fact is, it’s hard to find any new boat with old-fashioned incandescent lighting these days. LEDs (light-emitting diodes) have virtually supplanted incandescent lights in the marine market for navigational and ­general nighttime illumination.

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Need an example? An old-school 50-watt Jabsco Halogen incandescent flood (aka spreader) light draws 4 amps at 12 volts DC and produces 9,900 candlepower. By comparison, the 12-watt Lumitec Caprera2 LED spreader draws just 1.3 amps at 12 volts DC and produces 1,000 lumens, which roughly translates to 12,570 candlepower. What’s more, the color in which it shines is switchable between pure white and brilliant blue.

In addition, LED fixtures are more compact. The face on the Jabsco, for instance, measures 3-by-5 inches, while the face on the Caprera2 LED is just 2-by-4.5 inches. LEDs ­also produce far less heat than incandescent lights, a result of the inherent energy efficiency of this technology. 

However, LEDs are not without downsides, including greater purchase prices. The Jabsco Halogen incandescent spreader, for instance, retails for as little as $68, while the Lumitec Caprera2 spreader sells for around $135 or more. On the other hand, LEDs last much longer. The Caprera2 has an expected output life of 22,000 hours. The Jabsco bulb life is rated at just 450 hours.

LED technology enables ­illumination in a wide ­array of colors, allowing you to change the shading of accent or underwater lights via ­Wi-Fi with a smart mobile device. Some marine LEDs can be set to strobe to the beat of ­music, and many marine audio speakers feature built-in multicolor LEDs. What’s more, some offshore anglers believe that underwater LED strobe lights can help pull pelagic fish to the boat during daylight hours. 

While virtually all new saltwater fishing boats feature LED lighting, many ­older boats still have incandescent lights. But when these lights require replacement due to breakage or corrosion, boating anglers can replace them ­fairly easily with LEDs. In fact, LEDs could be the ­only marine illumination available soon as old-fashioned lights are gradually phased out. However, there are five factors to keep in mind when it comes to LED retrofits.

Read Next: How to Use Fishing Lights

Marine LED lights

Don’t install nonmarine lights on your boat. Marine-grade LEDs feature housings that resist UV light, corrosion and water intrusion, while others tailored for automotive or residential use can quickly succumb to the rigors of briny applications. Look for the highest waterproof ratings of IP6, IP6K or IP9K.

Ensure LEDs meet Coast Guard regulations. They should also comply with guidelines set by the American Boat and Yacht Council. Red (port) and green (starboard) side marker lights, for example, should illuminate a sector spanning 112.5 degrees from dead ahead to aft on each side. What’s more, nav lights—including the white all-around light—should meet the Coast Guard and ABYC requirements for visibility range. For boats under 40 feet in length, the required range is 2 ­nautical miles.

Look for LEDs with the same footprint. This will save you time, work and money in patching or enlarging holes, or creating an adapter for the new LED fixture. For example, Hella’s Slim Line LED ­courtesy lights will fit the same hole as the popular Perko round incandescent courtesy lights.

Avoid ­electromagnetic ­interference (EMI). Micro­circuits ­continually switch voltage off and on to the LED. If the LED circuit regulator is not properly shielded, the wire leading to an LED emits EMI that can interfere with onboard electronics, such as VHF radio interference, static on a stereo, and hash on a fish-finder screen. To avoid EMI, look for the CE designation on the marine LED fixture. This indicates that the manufacturer has complied with Conformité Européenne (European conformity) in shielding the LED.

Colored LEDs can create legal issues. The Coast Guard has issued a warning that haphazard placement and use of decorative, multicolor LEDs such as rope lights or underwater lights might violate federal navigational lighting regulations. “For instance, blue underwater LED lights can appear to be flashing if there is any wave action, giving the appearance of a flashing blue light only authorized for use by law enforcement vessels,” a Coast Guard bulletin states.

The key here is to ­carefully select, install and utilize marine LEDs. They will improve your ability to see and be seen at night while easing onboard battery management by ­conserving power. 

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Installing Transducers for Optimum Performance

  • By Randy Vance
  • Updated: January 14, 2010

Transducer Mounting

Our bottom finder is only as good as the signal sent and received by the unit’s transducer. While some manufacturers prefer a transducer mounted on the transom for optimum signal, such mounts can be vulnerable to striking debris. In-hull mounting can reduce the signal strength, but most experienced boaters prefer that to the less-protected exterior transom mount. Here are three ways to get a great signal from a reliable transducer mount.

Getting Started Skill Level: 2/5 Finish Time: 1 hour (not including sealant curing time and pulling the wire)

Tools and Supplies * Adjustable circle cutter * 3M 101 sealant * Silicone sealant * CPVC pipe and cap

Installing Transducers for Optimum Performance

Through-Hull Mounting These transducers, mostly made by Airmar, give an extremely reliable and sensitive signal even at high boat speeds. But putting them in takes a little finesse and a big belt of courage. You’ll need to choose one to match your sonar unit and the deadrise angle of your hull, so when installed, it directs its beam at 90 degrees to the bottom. If you don’t, your transducer will give inaccurate readings — the deeper the water, the larger the error, as the signal cone will have to travel farther at an angle than when transmitting vertically.

Step 1 Measure your hull’s deadrise — if you can’t find written specs on it. Deadrise is the angle in degrees of the hull from keel to chine. Use a level on the keel and a contractor’s protractor to measure the angle. Through-Hull Mounting You can fi nd a variety of transducers to fit any deadrise angle at airmartechnology.com

Step 2 Examine your boat’s hull and, if you have a trailer or hoist, note where the hull and bunks meet. Choose an area in the bilge near the transom where there are no chines, throughhull fittings or support bunks on the same line. Mounting closer to the keel gives better readings at high speeds, when the hull is likely to ventilate. Choose a spot that gives adequate clearance to service any fittings after installation too.

Installing Transducers for Optimum Performance

Step 3 Using a drill and circle cutter adjusted to the diameter of your transducer, drill your hole. Start a pilot hole through the hull at the center of the mounting position from the inside of the bilge. Use the pilot hole to position the circle cutter from the outside of the hull, and carefully drill through the hull and fiberglass liner (if your hull’s bilge has liner).

Step 4 Dry-fit the transducer, using a file or rasp to broaden the hole if necessary. Your transducer will have an arrow on the top where the wire comes out, indicating how it should be oriented toward the keel. Point the orientation arrow or index toward the keel to align the transducer element inside the housing to a vertical position for accurate readings.

Installing Transducers for Optimum Performance

Step 5 Spread sealant on the inside of the hole to seal the core between hull and liner. Put a bead of sealant around the flange of the transducer and press it in place. Have a friend hold it while you apply sealant around the base of the transducer inside the hull. Screw down the flange, stopping just short of finger-tight. Finish tightening after the sealant has cured 24 hours for a secure gasketlike seal.

Installing Transducers for Optimum Performance

In-Hull Mounting In shallow-water applications, many boaters simply glue their transducer to the inside bottom and it works pretty well. But keep in mind that your signal is reading the water slightly abeam of the boat. You can also purchase an in-hull transducer angled to match your hull’s deadrise.

Step 1 Follow steps 1 and 2 on the previous page. Don’t worry about trailer bunks on this installation — it’s one of its advantages. If you have a bilge liner, you’ll need to remove a section of the liner large enough to fit your in-hull transducer. You’ll need a router and cutting bit to do that. Seal the gap between the liner and hull with 3M 101 sealant. Be generous with the sealant — you don’t want this joint to fail.

Step 2 Using a silicone sealant, secure the face of your transducer to the hull’s surface and allow it to cure 24 hours before going boating.

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installing transducer on sailboat

  • Power Input: 10-35 V
  • Power Usage: 40 W maximum
  • Fuse: 7.5 A
  • Compass-Safe Distance: 15.75 in. (40 cm)
  • Frequency: 50/200 kHz
  • Transmit Power: 25-2,000 W rms
  • Maximum Depth: 5,000 ft. (1,524 m)
  • Boat Manufacturer: Cruisers Yachts
  • Part Number: V2827300
  • Part Manufacturer: Garmin
  • Model: GSD 24
  • Part Number: Unavailable
  • Color: Gray
  • Finish: Matte
  • Overall Dimensions: 11" W x 3 1/4" H x 7 5/8" D
  • Mounts: (4) 1/2" Dia. mounting holes
  • Connections: (1) Power, 2-pin male / (1) Network, female / (1) Transducer/XDCR, 8-pin male

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Sold as seen in pictures. Customers please note every computer shows colors differently. All measurements are approximate.

Instruction / installation manual not included.

Hardware not included.

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Lowrance® Eagle 7 Fish Finder/Chartplotter with SplitShot™ HD Transducer

Article # C: 375377 B: 3981314

Lowrance® Eagle 7 Fish Finder/Chartplotter with SplitShot™ HD Transducer

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Product Description

• SplitShot HD Transducer • FishReveal technology for vastly clearer presentations • Autotuning sonar to simplify setup and operation • Crisp IPS screen • Preloaded, high-resolution C-MAP inland charts of over 17,000+ American lakes

Easy to use and quick to install, the Lowrance® Eagle 7 Fish Finder/Chartplotter with SplitShot™ HD Transducer has advanced fish-finding power to elevate your angling. This Lowrance fish finder has the newly designed SplitShot HD Transducer with FishReveal technology and autotuning sonar for clear presentations and quick, optimal setup. An IPS screen provides higher resolution and better visibility from all angles. Preloaded, high-resolution C-MAP® inland charts for the US gives you coverage of over 17,000+ American lakes.

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installing transducer on sailboat

New Lowrance® Eagle 7 Fish Finder/Chartplotter with SplitShot™ HD Transducer

IMAGES

  1. Structure Scan and Transducer install

    installing transducer on sailboat

  2. Installing a Transom-Mount Transducer on a Boat

    installing transducer on sailboat

  3. How To Mount A Transducer On A Fiberglass Boat?

    installing transducer on sailboat

  4. How to mount a DI transducer exactly where you want it.

    installing transducer on sailboat

  5. Installing a Thru-Hull Transducer

    installing transducer on sailboat

  6. Installing a Transom-Mount Transducer on a Boat

    installing transducer on sailboat

VIDEO

  1. Tutorial

  2. Tutorial

  3. How to set up/install the transducer with railblaza mounts onto a inflatable boat/sib part 2

  4. Tutorial

  5. SIB/Inflatable Boat Trailer and removable Transom Transducer mount

  6. Learning about sailboat maintenance

COMMENTS

  1. Sailboat Transducer Installation

    Transom Mount Transducer Installation.Buy an OFFICIAL Sailing FreeStyle T-Shirt! - https://amzn.to/2ymeCSlPlease consider becoming a patron: https://www.patr...

  2. 5 Best Places To Mount A Transducer On A Boat (Explained)

    Where to mount a transducer on a boat. The top five transducer mounting locations on a boat are: Transom mount. Trolling motor mount. In-hull mount. Pole mount. Thru hull mount. Out of these five transducer placement options, the most commonly used ones by far are transom and trolling motor mounts, though the other three can also be great ...

  3. How To Properly Mount A Transom Transducer For Optimal Performance

    Consider the hull shape of your boat when determining the mounting location. Tools and Materials Needed Drill. When it comes to mounting a transducer on your boat, having the right tools is crucial. One of the most important tools you will need is a drill. Make sure to use a drill that is suitable for the material of your boat's transom.

  4. Installing a Transom-Mount Transducer on a Boat

    Attach the Transducer Tim Barker. Open the retaining cover on the top of the transducer bracket by depressing the latch and rotating the cover downward. Then insert the transducer's pivot posts into the slots on the top the bracket. With posts in position, push down on the transducer to click the posts in place.

  5. Installing a Thru-Hull Transducer

    Take care to align the transducer with the blunt/button/arrow end facing forward toward the bow. The long side must be parallel to the centerline of the boat. If installing a stainless steel transducer in a metal hull, be sure the isolation sleeve is between the transducer stem and the hull (see Figure 3).

  6. PDF Side Imaging Transducer Installation Guide

    There are a number of ways to install a transducer on your boat. The transom mount installation provides the least loss of signal since the transducer is mounted outside the boat hull. This installation also allows adjustment of both running angle and depth after the transducer is mounted, which enables you to tune the installation for best ...

  7. Mounting an In-Hull Transducer on a Boat

    An in-hull (aka shoot-through) transducer mounts to the inside of the hull and transmits and receives sonar signals through fiberglass, eliminating the need for drilling holes in the hull. This also eliminates the need to remove the boat from the water for installation, and there will be no protrusions under the boat. But there are downsides.

  8. How to Install a Boat Transducer Mounting Plate

    Professional boat rigger, Andy Kratochvil, performs a detailed DIY install of a common fish finder transducer mounting plate. He covers where to place the mo...

  9. PDF GT15M-IH Installation Instructions

    the transducer feedback when the bottom of the transducer is submerged outside the boat. 1 Place the transducer inside a thin plastic bag. 2 Fill the bag with enough water to cover the bottom of the transducer, and secure the bag with a zip tie. 3 Wet the surface of the hull. 4 Place the bagged transducer on the mounting location. 5 Observe the ...

  10. PDF Thru-Hull Transducer Installation Instructions

    Use a utility knife to cut a hole in the tape over the pilot hole. From outside the hull, use a 25 mm (1 in.) spade bit or hole saw to cut the stem hole. The hole must be perpendicular to the water surface. Test fit the transducer and verify the marked locations of the anti-rotation bolt holes.

  11. How To Install Flush-Mount Through-Hull Transducers

    Install the Transducer Tim Barker. 5. Install the Transducer After applying sealant, reinsert the transducer stem from under the boat. From inside, rotate the stem so that the arrow on top points perpendicular to the centerline to align the beam angle. Slide on a washer, the spacer (open side down), the second washer and the nut.

  12. PDF Transducer Placement Guide

    Attaches on the interior hull of the boat. See In-Hull Transducers, page 12. July 2022 GUID-D86E00AF-F9B3-497A-9F52-6EE1C2E12A51 v2. support.garmin.com \376\377Transom-Mount Transducers, page\2406 ... You should also avoid mounting the transducer aft of thru-hull fittings, water intake or discharge ports, or hull

  13. Mounting Transducers

    The transducer is mounted in a liquid-filled tank inside your vessel, bonded to the inner surface of the hull, and transmits sonar signals through the hull without direct exposure to the water. Great for trailer boats, there's no external hardware to be damaged during trailering, launch and retrieval. In-hull mounting means no added drag, and ...

  14. Transom-Mount Transducer Install Tips

    What to Know About a Transducer. 1.1 Use a Mounting Plate. 1.2 Tape Your Drill Bit. 1.3 No Electric Drivers! 1.4 Chamfer and Seal Your Holes. 1.5 Level Your Transducer with the Transom Waterline. 1.6 If You Lose Bottom at Speed, Go Lower. 1.7 Lower the Tail a Few Degrees is Necessary. 2.

  15. Install A Transducer Without Holes Below The Waterline

    Mounting screw holes in the board now shouldn't puncture the transom; you'll have room for mistakes and the ability to add different transducers later. — Tom Neale. Method 2: Shoot Through The Hull. If the bottom of your hull is solid fiberglass, meaning not cored, you can shoot through the hull by mounting a transducer inside the boat.

  16. How to Optimize Transducer Placement on Your Boat During Installation

    Transducer placement is extremely important to mark fish at speed. Transducer placement and mounting is the most critical step to sonar performance, but is ...

  17. Sonar and Transducer Basics

    Transmitting at 455kHz or 800kHz frequencies, scanning sonar provides high-resolution views to the sides (SideScan) and beneath (DownScan Imaging) the boat. 800kHz provides the sharpest resolution at shallower depths, while 455kHz delviers the best overall image quality and depth penetration. HDI. HDI is a transducer that combines a round ...

  18. How to Replace Transducers: Don't be Intimidated by the Challenge

    An installation, upgrade or replacement can trigger the need to make an install — but a replacement (especially to a larger or more sophisticated unit) tends to be the most daunting. Upgrade Job Recently, I worked with a client who was upgrading to a new system on a 1980's era Catalina sailboat and was replacing a transducer with a 2" (5. ...

  19. Rooster Rooter Installation Guide for Lowrance (Simrad) ActiveImaging

    Rooster Rooter Installation Guide for Lowrance (Simrad) ActiveImaging HD 3-in-1 FishReveal Transducer 6. Use a Phillips Head screwdriver to loosen and remove the 6 screws between the mounting bracket and the transducer. Retain the spring washers. Rooster Rooter Installation Guide for Lowrance (Simrad) ActiveImaging HD 3-in-1 FishReveal Transducer 7

  20. Glue/stick on transducer mounting plate

    This Old Boat ; Glue/stick on transducer mounting plate Recent Topics. Glue/stick on transducer mounting plate. m089221 Started 1 minute ago. Lake Erie Bite 2024. Gill-T Started March 26. 2024 Turkey. whaler1 Started April 16. Finished up a successful year. Kevin J Legg Started 20 hours ago. Fleas.

  21. MEGA Live Sonar Transducer

    View everything down, out and around your boat with live sonar. Choose from multiple viewing modes; Forward, Down and Landscape, provided by the included trolling motor shaft mount. ... Includes: MEGA Live Imaging transducer with adjustable mounting bracket, 10' power cable, 20' Ethernet cable and mounting hardware. Trolling motor and MEGA 360 ...

  22. Simrad Cruise 5 with US Coastal Charts and Transducer

    The Simrad Cruise 5 is a standalone 5-inch chartplotter/fishfinder with an easy-to-use rotary dial and keypad display. The Simrad Cruise 5 is pre-loaded with U.S ...

  23. How to Select, Install and Use Marine LEDs

    Don't install nonmarine lights on your boat. Marine-grade LEDs feature housings that resist UV light, corrosion and water intrusion, while others tailored for automotive or residential use can quickly succumb to the rigors of briny applications. Look for the highest waterproof ratings of IP6, IP6K or IP9K.

  24. Installing Transducers for Optimum Performance

    In-Hull Mounting In shallow-water applications, many boaters simply glue their transducer to the inside bottom and it works pretty well. But keep in mind that your signal is reading the water slightly abeam of the boat. You can also purchase an in-hull transducer angled to match your hull's deadrise. Step 1 Follow steps 1 and 2 on the ...

  25. GO9 XSE with HDI Transducer and C-MAP DISCOVER Chart

    A transom-mounted HDI Skimmer® transducer delivers fish-finding sonar for amateur anglers, and offers a simple way for powerboating enthusiasts to keep an eye on depth. CHIRP technology enables clear detection of fish throughout the water column, while DownScan Imaging™ sonar creates a picture-like view of fish-holding structure beneath your ...

  26. Garmin Boat Advanced Sonar Module

    Boat part number 1112000 is a new GSD 24 advanced sonar module black box network sounder from Garmin. Commonly used on Cruisers Yachts, part number V2827300 , but may be used on other boats. With up to 2,000 Watts of transmit power and a high-dynamic range receiver, the GSD 24 brings high-definition imaging to your compatible Garmin chartplotter.

  27. Support: Installing a Transom Mount Transducer

    Learn how to correctly install a Garmin transom mount transducer.For more help, visit http://support.garmin.com

  28. Transducer not Connected or Detected

    Lastly, if your transducer has a temperature probe, be sure to check the box next to Temp. Check the Sonar Port. If your transducer has temperature built in, double check your installation guide and make sure you have the transducer plugged into the proper connector. On some models, we have connectors that look similar but are not used for sonar.

  29. Scotty Kayak/Sup Transducer Mounting Arm, Track Mount, 0141

    Kayak/SUP Transducer Mounting Arm made of high strength composite material that will give you years of service without any corrosion. Features of Scotty Kayak/Sup Transducer Mounting Arm. Scotty Kayak/Sup Transducer Mounting Arm. Scotty Kayak/sup Transducer Arm is a quality addition to theScotty lineup. ... Cumings Red Boat Net- 21.5inX26in Bow ...

  30. Lowrance® Eagle 7 Fish Finder/Chartplotter with SplitShot™ HD Transducer

    • SplitShot HD Transducer • FishReveal technology for vastly clearer presentations • Autotuning sonar to simplify setup and operation • Crisp IPS screen • Preloaded, high-resolution C-MAP inland charts of over 17,000+ American lakes Easy to use and quick to install, the Lowrance® Eagle 7 Fish Finder/Chartplotter with SplitShot™ HD Transducer has advanced f