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J.P. Morgan's Corsair IV

When J.P. Morgan Junior took delivery of the Corsair IV   in 1930, she was the largest and most luxurious private yacht ever built in the USA. Morgan used her for a decade, mainly on the East Coast and in the Caribbean, before gifting her to the British Admiralty to help with the war effort.

After WWII she re-entered service as a cruise ship, plying routes in Alaska and from Long Beach California down to Mexico. The photo below shows her in Vancouver, 1948. Less than a year later she struck a rock and sank in shallow waters off Acapulco.

JP Morgan's Corsair IV

The story began in 1882 when J.P. Morgan Senior, one of the world's richest men and an avid yachtsman, bought the 185-foot steamship Corsair . He then commissioned the bigger, faster and more luxurious Corsair II   (which the US Navy conscripted into service as a gunboat during the Spanish-American War) and the 304-foot Corsair III ,  a superyacht that featured a full-beam library, cases of wine and brandy, and humidors stocked with Cuban cigars.

Each of these three yachts generated great publicity, but media attention was particularly intense when the Corsair III was launched in 1898. It was at this time that Morgan made one of the most famous comments ever recorded. When a journalist asked him how much it would cost to operate a yacht of this size, Morgan replied:

Sir, if you have to ask that question, you can't afford it.

J.P. Morgan Senior

The Corsair IV

The Corsair IV was commissioned by J.P. Morgan Junior and built at Bath Iron Works, Maine. When she was launched in April 1930 she measured 343 feet in length and was the largest private yacht ever constructed in the USA. Nicknamed the "Princess of the Sea", she was an object of beauty with her black hull, clipper bow and elegant teak interiors. Morgan adored her, and reveled in the privacy she afforded him. One of his annual guests while cruising in Europe was the UK's Archbishop of Canterbury, and on one memorable occasion the two of them sailed across the Mediterranean to the Holy Land.

Following the outbreak of WWII and the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, most privately-owned yachts in America were requisitioned by the US Maritime Commission and converted for use as gunships or patrol boats. For reasons which aren't entirely clear, Morgan gave the Corsair IV not to the US Navy but to the British Admiralty. Based in Bermuda, she served out the war as a patrol ship in the Western Atlantic.

Life as a Cruise Ship

After the war there was a dearth of cruise ships on America's West Coast. Many of the great Canadian Pacific and Japanese liners that serviced this coastline in the 1920s and 1930s had been lost in sea battles or fallen victim to mines. To plug this gap, the Pacific Cruise Lines company was formed in 1946 and promptly snapped up J.P. Morgan's Corsair IV . The yacht was re-named Corsair and taken to Canada to be converted to a luxury cruise liner.

With accommodation for 82 passengers and a crew of 76, the new Corsair exuded luxury. Staterooms were not only bigger and better equipped than rival ships, they were fitted with carpets and air-conditioning (almost unheard of at the time), and included furnishings made from the finest materials. The Corsair debuted in September 1947, offering two-week cruises from California to Acapulco. Ticket prices were high, but in booming post-war America, so was the demand.

SS Corsair Cruise Ship

The Corsair was a great success. Her cruises sold out well in advance and her popularity exceeded anything her new owners had imagined. Before long she switched from Mexico to Alaska and became the first ship to offer luxury cruises to the Inside Passage. Soon after she reverted to Mexico, the Panama Canal and across the Caribbean to Havana. And then tragedy struck: in November 1949 the Corsair hit a rock off the coast of Acapulco and sank. Fortunately none of her 55 passengers or crew were harmed.

Made in China: the Nero

In the early years of this century, British entrepreneur Neil Taylor began hunting for a classic yacht to restore and re-model along the lines of the Corsair IV . When he couldn't find what he wanted, Taylor set up his own company, Corsair Yachts, and commissioned a near replica of J.P. Morgan's yacht from Yantai Raffles Shipyard in China. Launched in 2008, the sleek, black-hulled superyacht was christened Nero . The following year she triumphed in the "Best Motor Yacht Over 75 Metres" category at the ShowBoats Design Awards.

Nero Yacht

In 2014 the Nero was bought by Irish billionaire Denis O'Brien. Two years later he had her refurbished in Spain, requesting that she be brought up to European standards and given a classic, contemporary elegance. The Nero is now available for summer charters in the Mediterranean and winter service in the Caribbean & Bahamas. Since her introduction to the charter circuit she has won praise for her fusion of old-world charm and tasteful styling, with many clients commenting positively on her spacious interiors, Ralph Lauren decor and relaxed living environments.

Nero Yacht Interior

Pinnacle Marine New Zealand

We have years of practical experience dealing with luxury yachts and are supported by a network of contacts throughout the industry. If you would like more information about luxury yachts, or anything else connected to the world of yachting, please feel free to contact us.

Grace, Michael (2008), The Tragic Life of the Corsair IV , New York Social Diary

Merl, Risa (2017), Nero: Inside the 90m Modern Classic Superyacht's MB92 Refit , Boat International

Viju, Mathew (2016), Eight Ways J.P. Morgan Defined the Good Life , Robb Report

Wisner, Bill (1975), The Golden Age of Yachts , Motor Boating and Sailing

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Personal items revealing j.p. morgan's opulent life at sea to be sold.

  • Artifacts to be sold from J.P. Morgan's yacht reveal high life of 19th-century American elite
  • Items include silver sculpted lamp, ivory poker chips and hundreds of pieces of rare china
  • Auction organizer says items show personal side of man known for exquisite taste
  • Morgan commissioned the 241-foot yacht "Corsair II" in 1890

(CNN) -- Artifacts from the megayacht of 19th-century financier J.P. Morgan are to be sold this weekend at an auction set to reveal how one of America's most influential men enjoyed life aboard his second home on the high seas.

Commissioned by Morgan in 1890, the 241-foot yacht "Corsair II" played host to many of the era's richest and most prominent figures, including U.S. presidents Theodore Roosevelt and William Taft, billionaire tycoons John D. Rockefeller and Andrew Carnegie, as well as light-bulb inventor Thomas Edison.

Although the "Corsair II" has been long-since scrapped for parts, intimate items from the elegant, wood-paneled yacht will be auctioned Sunday in Boston -- with some lots expected to achieve bids in excess of $200,000.

The hundreds of artifacts for sale range from hand-crafted bone china bearing the Morgan family crest, to specially designed Tiffany cigar-cutters, to a vast and intricate silver lamp carved in the shape of a mythological dolphin and -- most luxurious of all -- a fully restored 30-foot launch boat.

But for Larry Lannan, owner of Boston Harbor Auctions , who will be handling the sale, the standout item is stored in a velvet-lined box with the "Corsair" flag embossed in silver: Morgan's set of ivory poker chips.

"The man loved poker and was known to play high stakes with all the heavyweight industrialists, financiers and politicians of the day," said Lannan.

"Imagine the hands that have touched these chips -- the likes of Andrew Carnegie and Henry Ford. Just imagine all the late-night cigar-fueled drama in the middle of the sea, the fortunes won and lost!"

John Pierpont Morgan dominated the world of corporate finance throughout the late 1800s until his death at the turn of the century, but was also renowned for his passion of and investment in the arts, once stating: "No price is too great for a work of unquestioned beauty and known authenticity."

While Morgan filled rooms with masterpieces of fine art and collections of expensive gems, "most of it he never touched," said Lannan. "What we have here is a selection of very personal belongings that he and his closest circle would have handled on a daily basis -- his whiskey tumblers, tea cups, his chess table."

But, though prosaic, they are no less refined. The 220 pieces of china on auction were specifically tailored to Morgan's demands by English firm Mintons -- who at the time supplied crockery to the royal family.

"The blue trim with the gold accents and the Morgan signature flag of a crescent moon and star alongside the New York Yacht Club burgee -- all this would have been to Morgan's specific wishes," Lannan revealed. "He was certainly a man of highly particular tastes."

And for those who'd like to know what success really tasted like in the 19th century, then the auction also contains a rare bottle of J & G Stewart Scotch whiskey direct from Morgan's cellar.

"I'm not sure that it'll actually taste very nice," conceded Lannan. "So I hope whoever buys it won't be doing so for the flavor!"

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At Auction: Nautical Curiosities from J.P. Morgan’s Corsair

morgan yacht corsair

The second in a series of enormous steam yachts named Corsair was built for J.P. Morgan in 1890 by Neafie & Levy of Philadelphia, replacing an earlier craft used by the financier as a ferry between his Hudson River estate and office on Wall St. In 1897 the 241-ft. Corsair II became the flagship of the famed New York Yacht Club when Morgan was elected Commodore; in 1898 it was bought by the government and renamed the USS Gloucester , serving as a gunship in the Spanish-American War. Morgan, who commissioned an even larger Corsair to replace it, entertained great men of the day from Teddy Roosevelt and Thomas Edison to Mark Twain aboard the floating mansions fitted with every possible luxury.

Corsair with a Flagship banner. Some 220 pieces of it will be included in an historic sale of nautical curiosities from the various Corsairs and more at Boston Harbor Auctions on May 1. Other items from Morgan’s collection include a silver Tiffany & Co. cigar cutter designed in the Corsair ‘s crescent and star motif; his mahogany poker set complete with ivory chips; Boston-made brass ship’s clocks; embroidered table linens; specially bottled Scotch whisky and engraved tumblers; canvas covered wicker provisions trunks; and even a classic wooden launch from the Corsair III (pictured below in front of the NYYC in Newport). Not a bad haul….

Jared Paul Stern is the editor of Driven .

morgan yacht corsair

All photos courtesy Boston Harbor Auctions.

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Comments on “ at auction: nautical curiosities from j.p. morgan’s corsair ”.

Cute house.

Amazing. The interior is a wonder, I’m sure. I’ve been on Victorian Yachts at the Museum in Newport. Pianos, red velvet sofas. I can only imagine what’s in there.

Very cool. Great find MW.

Sweet! Bit of fun: the on-line catalog of the Morgan Library is called “Corsair.”

Jamie Dimon should buy it all.

I love the simplicity of the poker chips.

Comments are closed.

Old Long Island

Dedicated to the preservation of Long Island's 'gold coast' estates and other things old.

Thursday, January 26, 2012

J.p. morgan jr.'s corsair, 12 comments:.

Glamorous photo. As Morgan Sr. once said, "if you have to ask, you probably can't afford it"

Incidentally, Corsair was built at the Bath Shipyard here in Maine. We look at it in this photo and we're moved both by its graceful lines, and its tasteful opulence. What isn't entirely clear is its size: At 343 feet, it was likely around 150 feet and more LONGER than the Morgan house at Matinecock Point. Think about it.

Aaargh, I didn't mean to comment three times, but forgot to include this link to a good article about Corsair: http://www.newyorksocialdiary.com/node/30155

I don't own a hardcopy of this photo but it was among a number that sold at auction a few months ago that were part of a larger collection of Morgan family yachting possessions. Also sold was this beautiful trophy from J.P. and E.D. Morgan's racing yacht 'Columbia' (an America's Cup Defender): http://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/9921594

Today's word verification, "prime", is so appropriate for the subject of today's post. Also, great commuter yachton right of photo. My dad often told us about how he and his friends used to canoe under the bow of this magnificent yacht (while it was at anchor, of course). If any of you ever get to visit the Model Room of the New York Yacht Club, there is a large scale model of the Corsair (once the NYYC flagship)on display that is incredible. It features "cutaways" in the hull that allow you to peak into stateroom, head, coal bin, etc. Memorable, to say the least. OFLI

OFLI, I have indeed seen the model of Corsair at NYYC. Just extraordinary---as are so many of the models in that equally extraordinary room. There is also a magnificent model of the Corsair at the Maine Maritime Museum in Bath. It was made for the lobby of the Bath Ironworks, where Corsair was built. The fittings on that model are of gold to imitate the brass ones on the actual boat. Also on file at the Museum are the plans for Corsair. The various Corsairs plied Maine waters often---Mrs. Morgan Sr. and two of Morgan's Jr.s sisters all summered there (as did Morgan Sr.'s mistress), and the local Society columns of the day are full of tales of dinners held aboard the yacht, with sparkling guest lists, and tales of launches back and forth to shore. In his memoirs, Louis Auchincloss tells a marvelous tale of one Bar Harbor summer when his parents were summoned to dinner (his father sometime represented some of the Morgan interests). His mother, already invited to another party, made a social lie to her hostess of the sort that we're encouraged not to make as children, thus enabling them to go to the Morgan party. When called up by her children for the hypocrisy, she said that someday they would understand the necessity.

JP Morgan Chase owns a collection of dinnerware from the Corsair- terribly chic and elegant, emblazoned with the Corsair's flags (I think there's a nautical term for those triangular flags, but it escapes me) and comprising all sorts of items that no self respecting plutocrat would set to sea without: bouillon cups, oyster plates, celery dishes and the like.

DED, I'v driven past the Bath Iron works, but unfortunately, did not get a chance to stop in. I spent a few days at Small Point, Beautiful, but as one cruising book put it "... has mosquitos the size of sea gulls". Magnus, The small triangular flag you're referring to might be a burgee. For those of you interested in steam yachts, I would recommend the coffee table book, "The Steam Yachts: An Era of Elegance", by Erik Hoffman. Very nice book. In addition to the Ocean going yachts, it also features fast commuters, also owned by many of the North Shore's finest (such as the one pictured near the Corsair). On a nice day, it sure beatsa private train car or limo. OFLI

Magnus, love the details about the Corsair service. Quite remarkable, given the generally more casual air about even high end yachting nowadays, to think of the Morgans and their guests properly dressed for dinner, sitting down to delicate cups of consomme. The last time I was on a big yacht, a few months ago, it was ketchup bottles all the way. On the other hand, my great-grandfather, who was not particularly fancy in the big scheme of things, never went sailing without a tie, right into the 1960's. That era is very gone. OFLI, I have personally never seen a mosquito bigger than a sparrow up here, but I have heard of larger. I remember a summer evening many years ago, much too warm. I went down to the yacht club with the idea that I'd row a dinghy out to the center of the harbor and enjoy the still evening twilight. You'd think I'd know better in Maine at dusk in the summer. I lasted less than five minutes. I still remember the sound, like a million little dive bombers. It was like a scene in a horror movie---think 'The Birds' recast with mosquitoes.

I'm never clear on Morgan, Morgan Jr. - who owned "Matinecock Point"? Did Sr. first have property, then Jr. inherited? If I read the upside-down date(1894) stamped on copy I have - this yacht is Corsair II. Corsair I was a 185-foot purchase(1882) from Charles J. Osborn(Jay Gould's private banker}. Corsair II was 241-feet, commissioned after his father died around 1890. Designed by J. Frederick Tams and John Beavor-Webb. Corsair III was 304 feet built in 1899 by T. S. Marvel of Newburgh, NY. Corsair IV built at the Bath Works in 1929 was 343 feet. Link to captain's log on a early voyage - http://articles.businessinsider.com/2011-01-24/wall_street/30046344_1_brooklyn-bridge-jpmorgan-skylight

Half & Half, Morgan Sr.'s country estate was on the west bank of the Hudson River. As far as I know he never owned Matinecock.

O(F)LI: Burgee- yes. Thank you

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morgan yacht corsair

CORSAIR yacht       J. P. Morgan's yacht      

morgan yacht corsair

To escape the often tempestuous financial scene, J.P. Morgan found solace on the sea and owned a series of yachts during the course of his lifetime. He purchased his first luxury vessel in 1881, a 185-foot steamer christened Corsair. Nine years later, Morgan commissioned his first yacht -- the 241-foot Corsair (II). The Corsair yacht employed both sail and steam for propulsion. It was with the Corsair yacht that Morgan became commodore of the New York Yacht Club from 1897 to 1899.

A haven from the public eye, the yacht Corsair was a pelagic playground for an elite few. Included among the onboard opulence was handmade bone china by Minton, Tiffany cigar-cutters, and a set of poker chips carved from ivory.

The Corsair yacht served eight years for J.P. Morgan before she was purchased for $225,000 by the US Navy for service in the Spanish-American War.  She was renamed USS Gloucester. The last commander of the famous USS Maine, Lt. Richard Wainright, commanded her.

morgan yacht corsair

"I thought the work was exceptional and the model beautiful. The only feedback I would provide is that the Corsair yatch flag is missing and we couldn't find reference to the name or which version of the Corsair this model represents. I think it's the second one, but not sure.  Other than that, it was really great! Many thanks again. Warm regards, Jean Elliott Director, Corporate History Program JPMorgan Chase Bank July, 2011 "  

morgan yacht corsair

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SS Corsair IV

We see the ship here as the 1947 Pacific Cruise Lines SS Corsair having been sold

and completely renovated into a passenger ship from a private luxury yacht – Corsair IV

For many years the author had a folder somewhere in the system containing the ships details as well as a series of photographs of this remarkable small classic vessel. She certainly was not one of the great liners of the world, for she was built and designed to be a luxury yacht that would later become a deluxe cruise ship. Many of my regular readers may say that this ship does not fit the profile of ssmaritime.com, however, I believe that this delightful ship has a special place in maritime history, for sadly so little has been written about her! It was only due to an email received from a reader with an enquiry regarding this ship, which prompted me to write and compile this story, and I trust that it will be greatly enjoyed by those who read it, although the Corsair did have a tragic end!

Background to her building:

The story starts with the famed Business tycoon J. Pierpont Morgan and his son, Jack Morgan who had built three fine yachts in their days. All of them had been named Corsair & Corsair II & III . Like any great man of wealth and power each yacht be bigger, faster and even more luxurious than the previous one. Because of this, the family created massive media attention each time a new yacht was launched and when the last ship was launched a rather famous quote became a byword for many in the world of the rich. For when asked “Sir how much will it cost to operate a boat of this size” Mr. Morgan’s response was, “Sir, if you have to ask that question, you can’t afford it.”

J. P. Morgan Snr

Mr Morgan senior boarding the first SS Corsair

In 1927 the Morgan’s were already thinking of a new addition, the Corsair IV, which would be constructed at the Maine Shipyards. She cost US$2.5 million, being the equivalent of around 60 million plus in today’s terms. This new ship would be the Morgan’s largest yacht ever, but also the largest yacht to have been built in the U.S.A. She had an overall length of 104.55m / 343ft, although her official registered length was 91.4 m / 300ft. She was listed as: 2,142 GRT (Gross Registered Tons).

The Morgan’s had a love for the traditional yachts and even a touch of the pirate look in the designs. This was obvious in the Corsair IV, as she was a long, sleek looking, dark and heavy below, with a stylised superstructure that was lighter and to be envied!

Her Launching:

When she was ready for launching in 1930, Jack Morgan Junior hired three private railway cars which were filled with family and friends, and transported them all the Bath Iron Works Maine shipyards for the grand occasion. The launching was a great event and was covered by all the media of the day, considering the Great Depression had already begun.

The sleek looking motor yacht Corsair IV slips into the water  with a multitude of onlookers

 The SS Corsair is seen being fitted out beside her builders at Bath Maine

Photograph is owned and was provided by Mr. Mark Pennington

Mr. Mark Pennington wrote the author and stated: “My grandfather Ferdinand G. Dumais (Bud) worked at the Bath Iron Works during the construction of the SS Corsair and I have included two images he has left to me for your viewing and use. I only recently became aware of the identity of the ship and its owner through conversation with Mr. Nathan R. Lipfert, who is the Senior Curator of the “ Maine Maritime Museum ” in Bath Maine .”

A water colour image of the SS Corsair just after her completion

Image is owned and was provided by Mr. Mark Pennington

The author is most grateful to Mr. Pennington for providing these rare images and advising us about his Grandfather’s involvement in her building.

**********************************

The Corsair Story:

SS Corsair IV served the Morgan family faithfully for the ten years, sailing along the East Coast of the USA as well in the Caribbean and she took part for trans-Atlantic record-breaking crossings. However in 1940 the Corsair IV was handed over to British Admiralty to be used for the war effort. After the war was over she was laid up as the Morgan’s had no further plans for her.

  Here we see the SS Corsair IV completed and at sea looking simply splendid!

After World War II suddenly cruising had seemed to have become extremely popular amongst Americans who seemed to have money to spend on cruises, especially in the luxury end of the market. However at the time there were not any all first class ships that specialised in cruising, as most were liners that had two or three classed and operated on seasonal cruising. In addition, around half of the passenger ships had been sunk and those that had survived the war required extensive refurbishing and were needed on line voyages, and then even they would take several years before they would be back in service or new ships built. Well known North American Companies, such as American President Lines, Matson and Canadian Pacific Lines all took their time to get back to service. It took American President Lines three years to re-establish liner service to the Orient and it wasn’t until 1948 when Matson Line’s famous Lurline recommenced her Hawaii service.  Canadian Pacific also took their time, but they all sailed again in due time! But, none of these would be ready to operate cruises.

There were some business men in the shipping industry who had a good head on them and they had a good idea about the luxury cruise market, and thus the Skinner and Eddy Corporation who owned the Alaska Steamship Company in 1946 decided to form a new branch the Pacific Cruise Lines. They went looking for a ship and soon found the perfect ship for their needs, the Corsair IV. The former super luxury Morgan yacht was purchased reregistered Panamanian flag.

She was officially renamed Corsair , with the IV being dropped, was taken to the Todd Shipyards in New York where she received some minor repairs required at the time as well as an overhaul in the engine room.

SS Corsair’s engine room  – like the rest of the ship, it was spotless!

When these were completed she sailed to the Victoria Machinery Depot in Victoria , Canada , where a comprehensive conversion took place making her into a genuine luxury passenger cruise ship. Some of the most famous designers took part in her interiors, such as William F. Schorn & Associates of New York , who also worked on the famous liners SS Brazil, Argentina and Uruguay of McCormick Line. Every part of the ship, for now she was much more than just a yacht, but a glamorous ship, was redone in detail, but retaining the elegance befitting the luxury of the Corsair, but modernised with sublimely elegant surroundings for the ships passengers! When Skinner and Eddy Corporation of Pacific Cruise Lines planned a new ship, their plan was to offer to their cruise passenger one of the most luxurious cruise ship’s on the seas, and apparently they succeeded as the future booking would soon prove.

SS Corsair’s facilities:

Facilities on the new and glamorous SS Corsair were second to none . She had just 42 staterooms accommodating 82 passengers. Each of her staterooms was much larger and more luxurious than on almost any other ship afloat. Obviously there was no expense spared in furnishing and decorating them, with the finest materials, and all done with the best workmanship that was available in the USA . Each of the Corsair staterooms and suites featured luxury beds, as there were no passenger berths on her. In addition every stateroom and suite had a private bathroom.

The bedroom of a double bedded suite

The bedroom of a twin bedded stateroom

  Then lounge area of a twin bedded stateroom

SS Corsair had just over 40 stewards on board; however she did have a total of 76 crew members that is almost one per passenger, which is unheard of these days! Each passenger received individual attention and nothing was ever too much. Catering on board was the ultimate as some of the very top European chefs were hired to dish up their finest cuisine, and her food was lauded by everyone long after they had left the ship!

Stewards line up out on deck for inspection

One of the ships chefs ensuring the detail is perfect!

A gleaming galley

Her public rooms such as the Main Lounge, forward Observation Lounge, Cocktail Lounge, Restaurant and other on board venues were all luxuriously carpeted and fully air-conditioned as were all of her accommodations, bedrooms, sitting rooms and suites. The Morgan’s would have been very proud of her!

The Main Lounge

Forward Observation Lounge

Cocktail Lounge and Bar

The Thunderbird Restaurant

SS Corsair is ready to set sail:

Pacific Cruise Lines placed full-page advertisements for cruising on this super luxurious all first class SS Corsair in a popular Holiday magazine and the response was simply amazing. Suddenly bookings rolled in and before Pacific Cruise Lines knew it, they had a big waitlist on their hands. All was going well for their new ship! 

SS Corsair looking like a luxury cruise ship in her new all white livery

Note her hull enclosures and aft deck extensions

SS Corsair made her maiden voyage on September 29, 1947 as she departed on a two-week cruise from Long Beach , to Acapulco , via a variety of ports. The fare started from $600 per person, which was expensive for those days and it equalled, it is said “more than a quarter of the 1947 typical American family income” at that time. But this was a luxury cruise line and was aimed at the rich and her cruises were selling out well in advance. Her popularity as a luxury cruise ship was even bigger than her owners could have imagined, as countless letters proved from her passengers during the first twelve months of operation. The super luxury cruise ship, SS Corsair was a massive success, and she was to have a profitable long future ahead of her!

Above and below : The 1948/49 Acapulco  cruise brochure

Her Long Beach to Mexico cruises continued, however in the summer of 1948 Pacific Cruise Lines switched the Corsair to Alaska service, sailing out of Vancouver, British Columbia where she was the very first ship ever to provide a deluxe two-week cruise to the Inside Passage. In addition, there was another first for the Corsair Alaska cruises for they also had am especially chartered train transporting passengers from Whittier to famed McKinley National Park , which is now the norm with most cruise lines, but the Corsair was the forerunner of this operation!  

Above and below : The 1949 Alaska brochure

This season was followed by a series of cruises to Mexico and Havana , where she cruised the Gulf of California and the Panama Canalthis schedule was completed in the spring of 1949. She then returned to Alaska for a series of summer cruises, which was again repeated by a season of cruises to Mexico from Long Beach beginning in October 1949.

SS Corsair seen at Long Beach California

Passengers enjoying the cruising life on SS Corsair:

Passengers enjoying a drink aft of the ship on the “big bed”

An intimate moment on the aft “big bed” – still has that feel of a yacht!

Having fun up on deck

Tragedy struck the SS Corsair on November 12, 1949:

Then suddenly on November 12, 1949 whilst on a Mexican Riviera cruise, SS Corsair struck a rock and being in danger of sinking, she was beached at Acapulco . Her crew and all 55 passengers took to her lifeboats and went safely ashore.

Tragedy has struck as we see the Corsair on the rocks

This photograph is the property of “Puget Sound Maritime Historical Society”

Thus, thankfully there was no loss of life. The Corsair soon listed onto her starboard side, and her promenade deck was soon under water. She was examined by her marine experts and owners, however it was determined that the luxury cruise ship was a total loss, and thus she was abandoned to “Davy Jones’ locker.” Today divers go down and look at this once great lady of the sea and they can only imagine her grandeur that once was.

As we think of the countless ships that I have written on over the years, we must admit that this small luxury yacht come cruise ship is very special indeed. There have been very few ships that compare to this magnificent super luxury cruising yacht in these modern days, for they build massive ships well over 223,000 GRT that simply look more like hideous Condos, and square boxes with a hull under it. But 1. you will cruise with a crowd, and 2. None will any of those ship come even close   to equal the sublime elegance of the former J.P. Morgan yacht SS Corsair IV!

  Sadly the storm clouds says it all, her days are over!

The end to P. J. Morgan’s dream

Remembering the SS Corsair IV

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Introducing Limited Edition Residences on Greenwich Harbor

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the CORSAIR

A PLACE WITH AUTHENTICITY AND COMPELLING NATURAL BEAUTY.

A PLACE OF ENDURING VALUE.

A PLACE TO BE TREASURED BY FUTURE GENERATIONS AS IT IS PRIZED TODAY.

INSPIRED BY THE LUXURIOUS CORSAIR FLAGSHIP YACHT OF THE GOLDEN AGE

The Corsair is the realization of a grand vision achieved with some of the world’s best architects and designers to create a signature waterfront community on a rare stretch of Greenwich Harbor that was settled more than 300 years ago.

The Corsair showcases timeless stone and shingle architecture with classic materials to create a place that seems to have been here forever. Beneath its traditional design, The Corsair has integrated environmentally sustainable infrastructure and technology to offer state-of-the-art living spaces.

Most spectacularly, every home has breathtaking views that connect one directly to the water and break down the barriers between indoor and outdoor living.

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THESE LIMITED EDITION RESIDENCES ARE NAMED FOR J. P. MORGAN'S 1930 CORSAIR IV, A 300-FT LUXURY YACHT.

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ROBERT A. M. STERN IS A WORLD-RENOWNED, NEW YORK-BASED ARCHITECT, EDUCATOR, AND AUTHOR.

Residences masterfully designed, by visionary, robert a. m. stern.

The selection of Robert Stern as architect was based on the firm’s international acclaim for their visionary residential projects including 15 Central Park West and 30 Park Place in New York City as well as high-end buildings in London, Paris, Los Angeles and Charleston. Robert Stern specializes in designing luxury waterfront properties including many beautiful Hamptons beach homes. In addition, from 1998 to 2016, he was the Dean of the Yale School of Architecture

the BUILDING & COMMUNITY FEATURES

  • Outdoor swimming pool
  • Expansive landscaped lawns & gardens
  • Private storage units
  • Parking garage
  • Private dock
  • Panoramic views of Greenwich Harbor
  • Walking distance to Greenwich Train Station, 45-minute express to Grand Central
  • Walking distance to Greenwich Avenue, boutique shopping, cafes and restaurants
  • Adjacent to Indian Harbor Yacht Club

GREENWICH HARBOR

Timeless modern luxury.

The Corsair is located directly on Greenwich Harbor and within walking distance of Greenwich Avenue, the heart of the Town, which offers high-end retailers, luxury boutiques and chic eateries. The Corsair is further improved by a short walk to the Greenwich Train Station, where one can catch a 45-minute express directly into Grand Central. Located in one of the most affluent communities in the United States, Greenwich offers excellent schools, gorgeous beaches and parks, art and cultural institutions including the Bruce Museum and extensive recreational facilities including golf, sailing and rowing clubs.

jp morgan

THE BELL, CAST IN BRASS, WAS USED ON BOARD THE CORSAIR. IT NOW RESIDES IN THE MORGAN LIBRARY & MUSEUM. IT IS RUNG DAILY TO SIGNAL THE MUSEUM’S CLOSING.

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THE CORSAIR WATCH WAS PRESENTED BY J.P. MORGAN TO J. FREDERIC TAMS FOR BUILDING THE YACHT CORSAIR.

The residences, every home has breathtaking views that connect one directly to the water.

These seven remarkable condominium residences feature single-level living with seamless indoor-outdoor layouts and nautical-style wooden finish.

The residences connect contemporary lifestyles to traditional American aesthetics, evoking a sense of graceful timelessness.

the RESIDENCE FEATURES

  • All residences have private porches/balconies
  • Kolbe™ Mahogany windows & doors
  • Prefinished solid oak, wide plank flooring
  • Detailed base, crown molding & custom paneling
  • Gas fireplace
  • Smart Home thermostat system
  • Oversized solid-core doors with solid brass hardware
  • Pre-wired for blinds/shades
  • Front-loading HE™ Washer & Dryer
  • Designer Kitchen
  • Master Spa Bathroom

RESIDE IN LUXURY DEFINED BY

The details.

The close attention that has been paid to the custom design and luxurious finishes, both inside and out, prove that luxury is indeed in the details.

morgan yacht corsair

waterfront VIEWS

From every residence.

Overlooking Belle Haven and the Long Island Sound, all homes at The Corsair are accentuated with generous terraces and expansive windows that allow natural light into every corner of the home. Complete with its own private dock and outdoor swimming pool, The Corsair offers true waterfront living.

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A MODEL OF THE CORSAIR IV, WORLD-RENOWNED FOR ITS CRAFTSMANSHIP AND INNOVATIVE DESIGN. FACILITIES ON THE GLAMOROUS CORSAIR WERE SECOND TO NONE.

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To escape the often tempestuous financial scene, J.P. Morgan found solace on the sea and owned a series of yachts during the course of his lifetime. It is Morgan who, when asked the expense in maintaining such a vessel, is credited as saying the now cliché approximation of, “if you have to ask how much […]

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©The Morgan Library & Museum, Archives Collection

Corsair III in Vencie 1902

©The Morgan Library & Museum, Archives Collection

morgan yacht corsair

To escape the often tempestuous financial scene, J.P. Morgan found solace on the sea and owned a series of yachts during the course of his lifetime. It is Morgan who, when asked the expense in maintaining such a vessel, is credited as saying the now cliché approximation of, “if you have to ask how much it costs, you can’t afford it.”

Commodore of the New York Yacht Club from 1897 to 1899, Morgan purchased his first luxury craft in 1881, a 185-foot steam sailor christened Corsair . Just nine years later, Morgan commissioned the 241-foot Corsair II (designed by John Beaver-Webb and built by Neafie & Leavy out of Philadelphia), which included a 30-foot tender.

A haven from the public eye, the yacht was a pelagic playground for an elite few. Included among the onboard opulence was handmade bone china by Minton, Tiffany cigar-cutters, and a set of poker chips carved from ivory. The latter sold for $66,000 at auction in 2011.

In 1898, the Corsair II was conscripted into service by the United States Navy and became the USS Gloucester , a gunboat used during the Spanish-American War. This naturally necessitated that Morgan have a replacement, so the 304-foot Corsair III was constructed the same year by T.S. Marvel Shipbuilding. Amidst the yacht’s lavish layout were found a library that extended across the beam, a player piano, cases of wine and brandy, humidors stocked with Cuban cigars, and a comprehensive collection of dining accessories, including pearl-handled fruit knives, julep strainers, finger bowls and, of course, asparagus tongs. After Morgan’s death, the third iteration of Corsair saw action as a patrol ship in WWI and as a survey ship in the Pacific theater during WWII.

Sharing his father’s nautical nature, J.P. Morgan Jr. carried on the tradition by having the 343-foot Corsair IV completed in 1930. The largest yacht built in the United States at the time, it came at a cost of $60 million by today’s standards.

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LAUNCHING OF THE CORSAIR; J.P. Morgan's New Yacht Slides Gracefully into the Water. CHRISTENED BY MISS MORGAN A Special Train Takes the Friends of the Commodore to Newburg to Witness the Ceremony.

LAUNCHING OF THE CORSAIR; J.P. Morgan's New Yacht Slides Gracefully into the Water. CHRISTENED BY MISS MORGAN A Special Train Takes the Friends of the Commodore to Newburg to Witness the Ceremony.

The steam yacht Corsair, which has been built by Marvel of Newburg, was successfully launched yesterday. The yacht was built for Commodore J. Pierpont Morgan of the New York Yacht Club, and is one of the largest yachts constructed in this country. When Commodore Morgan sold the Corsair to the Government he commissioned J. Beavor Webb to design another yacht for him, and the boat was laid down at Marvel's yard last June. View Full Article in Timesmachine »

Cruising The Past Cruise News

Judy garland premiere of a star is born, j. pierpont morgan’s yacht corsair iv became a cruise ship to mexico..

Posted by: Michael Grace May 22, 2009

J. Pierpont Morgan Jr. could never have imagined his yacht Corsair IV being converted into a deluxe cruise ship whose short career would end in tragedy but it happened on a sailing from California to Acapulco in 1949.

J.P. Morgan Jr. and his legendary business tycoon father, J. Pierpont Morgan, made cruise history, owning four magnificent yachts christened Corsair, and built three of them.

Each yacht was bigger, faster, and more comfortable than the preceding one.

The Morgan Corsair created major media attention for the times resulting in a legendary quote by the senior Morgan when he was asked how much it cost to operate a boat that size. His quick response: “Sir, if you have to ask that question, you can’t afford it.”

Corsair IV was constructed in Maine at the beginning of the Great Depression for $2.5 million (or about $60 million in today’s currency). Measuring 2,142 gross tons, with a registered length of 300 feet and overall length of 343 feet, the Corsair IV was the largest yacht ever built in the U.S. Designed in the traditional piratical look of Morgan yachts, Corsair IV was long, dark, heavy underneath – paler and suaver in the superstructure.

The Corsair launching in 1930.

When it was ready for launching in 1930, Morgan brought three private railway cars of family and friends up to the Maine shipyards for the occasion.

Morgan used her for ten years, mostly on the East Coast, in the West Indies and for trans-Atlantic record-breaking crossings. After an eventful career with Morgan, the Corsair IV was turned over to British Admiralty in 1940.

Following World War II, rich Americans had money to spend on cruises but choices were limited. Half the commercial passenger vessels had been sunk and the surviving liners demanded extensive refurbishing. It would be several years before many refurbished ships would be back in service or any new ships built.

This was especially true in California and on the West Coast. American Presidents Lines took three years to re-establish liner service to the Orient and it wasn’t until 1948 when Matson Line’s famous Lurline sailed again to Hawaii.

The magnificent pre-war Canadian Pacific and Japanese liners that once plied the Pacific had been brutally sunk in seagoing battles.

Life Magazine featured the new Corsair.  It was probably the most deluxe cruise ship operating after World War II.

Realizing there was an untapped post-War luxury cruise market, the Skinner and Eddy Corporation, owners of the Alaska Steamship Company, created Pacific Cruise Lines in 1946.

The newly formed subsidiary immediately went looking for a ship and was lucky enough to quickly spot its prize, Corsair IV.

The former Morgan yacht was bought from undisclosed buyers and placed under Panamanian registry.

The Corsair (the IV was dropped) was taken to Todd Shipyards in New York for repair and overhaul, and then sailed to the Victoria Machinery Depot in Victoria, Canada, for conversion to a luxury cruise vessel.

The ultra-deluxe public rooms and staterooms aboard the Corsair.

In charge of her interior was the firm of William F. Schorn Associates of New York. Schorn was also responsible for giving the pre-war Moore-McCormick Liners cruising to South America from New York – Brazil, Argentina and Uruguay –a much more contemporary look. He provided the same meticulous detail to designing the modern accommodations for the new elegant Corsair. This was not just a paint job but also a total conversion for the former Morgan yacht to create elegant surroundings for the line’s future passengers.

The goal of Pacific Cruise Lines was to offer to the traveling public the world’s most luxurious cruise ship. The many letters received from the cruise passengers during the first year of service attested to that accomplishment.

The Pacific Cruise Line’s S.S. Corsair, ready to sail from Long Beach, California in 1948.

Accommodating only 82 passengers, all rooms were much larger and more commodious than as expected on shipboard at that time. No expense was spared in furnishing decorating each room with the very finest of materials and workmanship available. There were no berths on the Corsair and all staterooms featured beds. Each room had its own private bath.

There were a total of 42 rooms on the ship and the steward’s department personnel alone numbered more than forty. Each was responsible for the sole purpose of catering to the slightest desire of the carriage trade passengers. All public rooms, including the main lounge, forward observation lounge, cocktail lounge, etc., were completely carpeted and air-conditioned. This was also true of all bedrooms, sitting rooms and suites. Top European chiefs were hired to create haute cuisine. A total of 76 crewmembers and officers were aboard the new cruise ship, making the passenger to crew ratio almost one to one, equaling or surpassing the most high end cruise ships operating today.

The new Corsair made her debut on September 29, 1947 offering two-week cruises from Long Beach, California, to Acapulco, Mexico. The standard price per person rate averaged $600. Hardly a bargain since the ship’s cruise fare equaled more than a quarter of the 1947 typical U.S. family income.

The new cruise line placed attractive full-page ads for cruising on the new stylish first class Corsair in Holiday magazine. Demand for passage was heavy and the wait lists lengthy. During the summers of 1948, the Corsair was switched to Alaska. Sailing out of Vancouver, British Columbia, she provided the first deluxe two-week cruises ever offered to the Inside Passage. Another first for the Corsair Alaska cruises was a special chartered train transporting passengers from Whittier to famed McKinley National Park.

A series of cruises to Mexico, Havana via the Panama Canal and the Gulf of California were scheduled and completed in the spring of 1949. The cruise ship returned to Alaska for summer sailings and was to be followed by a season of cruises to Mexico from Long Beach beginning in October. Then tragedy struck on November 12, 1949.

The Corsair, during one of her autumn Mexican Riviera cruises, struck a rock and beached at Acapulco. Her crew and 55 passengers were put ashore in lifeboats.

There was no loss of life. Examined by her owners, the former Morgan yacht was determined to be a total constructive loss, and abandoned to Davy Jones’ locker.

Even during this age of mega-liners, no other ships will ever equal the elegance, exclusivity and style of the former Morgan yacht.

The Corsair’s legacy lives on only for divers willing to explore the remains of the vessel deep in the warm seas off Acapulco.

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J.P. Morgan´s Corsair (II) in 1892 | by frankmh

J.P. Morgan´s Corsair (II) in 1892

Commuting in style. american financier and banker j.p. morgan (1837 - 1913) sometimes enjoyed commuting between his hudson river estate and the office on wall street by boat. his second yacht named corsair, which morgan owned from 1890 to 1898, was certainly one of the most luxurious commuting vehicles the world has ever seen. in 1897 - 1898, when morgan was commodore of the new york yacht club, corsair served as the club´s flagship. the 241-foot steam yacht, designed by john beaver-webb and built by neafie & levy, philadelphia, was of course mainly used for longer voyages and entertaining: " it served as a pleasure cruiser in new york, on which morgan hosted many social events with famous guests such as theodore roosevelt and thomas edison, and often took morgan upstate and to various points on the eastern seaboard. more interestingly, the boat also made regular trips across the atlantic to europe during the primary period of morgan's book and art collecting, and therefore served as a ferry for his acquisitions back to the united states. as a result, it maintained a key role in establishing one of the greatest book collections inamerica." ( www.williamreesecompany.com ) in 1898 corsair was acquired by the united states navy and altered to a gunboat, the uss gloucester. she was struck from the naval vessel register on 12 august 1919 and sold later the same year, according to wikipedia. i have not been able to find out what happened after that. maybe she was scrapped hopefully some somebody can help with more information.   my colorization of a 1892 photo in the library of congress archive (detroit publishing co. collection)..

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Model of JP Morgan's "Corsair IV", 1930 - Lannan Gallery

Lannan Gallery

Model of JP Morgan's "Corsair IV", 1930

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Exceptional, museum quality model of Corsair IV , JP Morgan's private steam yacht. This model is outfitted with raised paneled mahogany cabins, planked deck, turned brass fittings, rigged masts and etc. Detailed longboats and launches hang from davits. The vessel flies the New York Yacht Club burgee and the Morgan house flag. Mounted into a mahogany display case with matching table.

Overall Dimensions: 56" L x 16" W x 57" H

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CORSAIR , THE MORGAN LIBRARY'S ONLINE PUBLIC CATALOG, IS NOW ACCESSIBLE THROUGH THE INTERNET

Dr. Charles E. Pierce, Jr., Director, the Morgan Library, announced today that CORSAIR , the Morgan's online public catalog, is now accessible through the Internet to scholars, researchers, and the public at http://corsair.morganlibrary.org. It also can be reached through the Morgan's Web site.

Named after Pierpont Morgan's yacht, CORSAIR is a comprehensive guide to the Morgan's collections. Within one database and using a single search interface, it provides unified access to over two hundred thousand records for medieval and Renaissance manuscripts, rare books, literary and historical manuscripts, music scores, ancient seals and tablets, drawings, prints, and other art objects. About 90 percent of the Morgan's holdings are represented in the catalog. An extensive navigation system of help screens and sample searches tailored to the collections assists readers in choosing the most appropriate search techniques for their queries and suggests alternative strategies as well.

The depth of detail is unusual for an online catalog. Many records include summaries of the content of individual letters, lengthy notes about provenance, and detailed descriptions of bindings. Specialized indexes enable researchers to find all of the Morgan's holdings associated with a given name, date, or place. For example, with a single search a scholar interested in Dickens can find records for manuscripts and letters in the author's hand, early printed editions of his novels, and preparatory drawings for illustrated editions of his works. A search for letters written in Paris at the outbreak of the French Revolution leads to a letter describing the chaos in Paris following the Fall of the Bastille along with letters from Thomas Jefferson inquiring about return passage to America for himself and his party.

" CORSAIR is not meant to replace access to original works in the collection," explained Elizabeth O'Keefe, Director of Collection Information Systems and Project Manager. "Rather, it serves the world as a first line of research and is expected to stimulate greater interest in the holdings than ever before."

"We are delighted to provide researchers and the public alike with this unprecedented means of access to the varied riches of the Morgan Library," said Dr. Pierce. "This complex and extraordinary project is the result of many years' work as well as great dedication and determination. The launch of this service is a historic occasion for the Library."

CORSAIR , a $3-million effort, was funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Arcana Foundation, The Alice Tully Foundation, The Mary Flagler Cary Charitable Trust, the Booth Ferris Foundation, the Florence Gould Foundation, The Arthur Vining Davis Foundations, and The E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, among many other generous supporters.

CORSAIR is made possible with public funds from The New York State Council on the Arts.

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CORSAIR Online Collection Catalog (The Morgan Library & Museum)

Link:  http://corsair.morganlibrary.org/

Project Status:  Ongoing

Named after Pierpont Morgan’s yacht,  CORSAIR  is a single database providing unified access to over 250,000 records for medieval and Renaissance manuscripts, rare and reference books, literary and historical manuscripts, music scores, ancient seals and tablets, drawings, prints, and other art objects. Records continue to be added for the balance of the collection as well as for new acquisitions.

The depth of detail is unusual for an online catalog. Many records include summaries of the content of individual letters, lengthy notes about provenance, and detailed descriptions of bindings. Specialized indexes enable researchers to find all of the Morgan’s holdings associated with a given name, date, or place. For example, with a single search a scholar interested in Dickens can find records for manuscripts and letters in the author’s hand, early printed editions of his novels, original illustrations, photographs, and personal possessions such as Dickens’ ink pot and cigar case.

CORSAIR  also serves as the gateway to one of the largest repositories of medieval images on the Internet, providing access to more than 57,000 digitized images from the Morgan’s collection of medieval and Renaissance manuscripts. Users may page through every illustrated leaf within a manuscript, or search for individual images by place or date of creation, artist’s name, illustration type, and subject. The images and descriptions may be accessed directly through CORSAIR, or by visiting  Images from Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts .

Resource details:

Resource Type:  Catalog ,  Images ,  Manuscripts/Facsimiles ,  Searchable Database

License:  Must provide credit ,  No Fee

Modern Language:  English

Medieval content details:

Dates:  400 - 1600

Subject:  Agriculture ,  Apocalypticism ,  Arabic ,  Archaeology ,  Architecture ,  Art ,  Biblical studies ,  Byzantium ,  Carolingians ,  Celtic ,  Chivalry ,  Church Fathers ,  Classics, Humanism ,  Clergy ,  Codicology ,  Confession, Penance ,  Conversion ,  Cosmology ,  Courtly Love ,  Crusades ,  Death, Burial ,  Diplomacy ,  Diplomatics ,  Early English Studies ,  Early Germanic Peoples ,  Economy ,  Education, Universities ,  Epistolography ,  Family, Children, Marriage ,  Food and Drink ,  Gender ,  General reference ,  Geography ,  Government ,  Heresy ,  History ,  Iconography ,  Immigration ,  Jews, Judaism ,  Landscape, Natural History ,  Law ,  Linguistics ,  Literature ,  Liturgy ,  Magic, Witchcraft ,  Manuscript Decoration/Illumination ,  Manuscript Studies ,  Maritime ,  Material Culture ,  Medicine ,  Middle English ,  Military Orders ,  Monasticism ,  Music ,  Muslims, Islam ,  Nobility, Gentry ,  Paleography ,  Papacy ,  Peasants ,  Philology ,  Philosophy, Theology ,  Piety ,  Plague, Disease ,  Political Thought ,  Poverty, Charity ,  Prosopography ,  Recreation, Entertainment ,  Reform ,  Religion - Institutional Church ,  Revolt ,  Royalty, Monarchs ,  Saints ,  Science, Mathematics ,  Scriptural Exegesis ,  Seals ,  Sex, Sexuality ,  Slavery ,  Social Groups ,  Syriac ,  Theology ,  Towns, Cities ,  Travel, Pilgrimage ,  Vikings ,  War ,  Women ,  Women Religious

Type/Genre of Medieval Primary Source Material:  Art and Artifacts ,  Manuscripts ,  Material Evidence

Geopolitical Region:  Africa ,  Asia, East and South ,  Europe ,  Middle East

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Electrostal History and Art Museum

morgan yacht corsair

Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

Andrey M

Electrostal History and Art Museum - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (with Photos)

IMAGES

  1. Corsair

    morgan yacht corsair

  2. JP Morgan's yacht Corsair

    morgan yacht corsair

  3. JP Morgan's yacht Corsair

    morgan yacht corsair

  4. 54: Press photo of J.P. Morgan's yacht Corsair

    morgan yacht corsair

  5. The steamer yacht Corsair IV, built for J.P. Morgan Jr. in 1930

    morgan yacht corsair

  6. Corsair

    morgan yacht corsair

COMMENTS

  1. J. P. Morgan's former yacht CORSAIR sailed as a deluxe cruise ship from

    MORGAN'S YACHT CORSIAR IV COST $65 MILLION TODAY'S DOLLARS CW: J. P. Morgan Jr., Corsair IV, Corsair IV being launched in Maine. Corsair IV was constructed in Maine at the beginning of the Great Depression for $2.5 million (or about $60 million in today's currency).

  2. J.P. Morgan's Corsair IV Yacht

    When J.P. Morgan Junior took delivery of the Corsair IV in 1930, she was the largest and most luxurious private yacht ever built in the USA. Morgan used her for a decade, mainly on the East Coast and in the Caribbean, before gifting her to the British Admiralty to help with the war effort.

  3. The tragic life of the Corsair IV

    The steamer yacht Corsair IV, built for J.P. Morgan Jr. in 1930, after its postwar conversion into a cruise ship in the Pacific. Social History • BY: Michael Grace J. Pierpont Morgan Jr. could never have imagined his yacht Corsair IV being converted into a deluxe cruise ship whose short career would end in tragedy but it happened.

  4. USS Oceanographer (AGS-3)

    Morgan yacht Corsair III, designed by John Beavor-Webb, was built in 1898 by T. S. Marvel Shipbuilding, Newburgh, New York, christened by the daughter of the owner, Miss. Louisa Morgan, and her hull launched in December 1898. [2] [3] Her triple expansion steam engines were fitted by W. & A. Fletcher Co. of Hoboken, New Jersey after launch. [2] J.

  5. Personal items revealing J.P. Morgan's opulent life at sea to be sold

    Morgan commissioned the 241-foot yacht "Corsair II" in 1890 (CNN) -- Artifacts from the megayacht of 19th-century financier J.P. Morgan are to be sold this weekend at an auction set to...

  6. At Auction: Nautical Curiosities from J.P. Morgan's Corsair

    The second in a series of enormous steam yachts named Corsair was built for J.P. Morgan in 1890 by Neafie & Levy of Philadelphia, replacing an earlier craft used by the financier as a ferry between his Hudson River estate and office on Wall St.

  7. J.P. Morgan Jr.'s Corsair

    J.P. Morgan Jr. 's yacht Corsair ready to leave Glen Cove in 1934. Click HERE to see Morgan's estate ' Matinecock Point ' designed by Christopher Grant LaFarge c. 1913 on East Island in Glen Cove. Click HERE for more on the Corsair yachts on the New York Social Diary. Posted by at 6:55 AM

  8. JP Morgan's yacht Corsair

    Contact Us Work Opportunity F eedback 256-bit encryption $500,000 protection CORSAIR yacht J. P. Morgan's yacht To escape the often tempestuous financial scene, J.P. Morgan found solace on the sea and owned a series of yachts during the course of his lifetime.

  9. SS Corsair IV

    In 1927 the Morgan's were already thinking of a new addition, the Corsair IV, which would be constructed at the Maine Shipyards. She cost US$2.5 million, being the equivalent of around 60 million plus in today's terms. This new ship would be the Morgan's largest yacht ever, but also the largest yacht to have been built in the U.S.A.

  10. Auction of Historic Items From J. Pierpont Morgan's Megayacht

    Value: $25,000 to $30,000. Other items for sale include a Tiffany cigar cutter, emblazoned with the Morgan house flag, and a velvet-lined mahogany box of poker chips. The box still features the New York Yacht Club burgee and Morgan house flag, made of cloisonne. There are also linens and brass clocks. Bids can be made in person or online.

  11. The Corsair

    these limited edition residences are named for j. p. morgan's 1930 corsair iv, a 300-ft luxury yacht. robert a. m. stern is a world-renowned, new york-based architect, educator, and author. ... the corsair watch was presented by j.p. morgan to j. frederic tams for building the yacht corsair.

  12. Yachts

    # 1 Yachts Corsair I Corsair I 01 Corsair III in Vencie 1902 ©The Morgan Library & Museum, Archives Collection Corsair I To escape the often tempestuous financial scene, J.P. Morgan...

  13. Corsair

    Directions A magnificent model of the American Steam Yacht Corsair, 1890. With masts and booms, standing and running rigging, anchors, anchor davits, winch, deck lights, paneled deck houses, with doors and windows, deck rails, companionways, deck lights, open bridge with telegraphs, binnacle and helm, ventilators, stayed funnel,

  14. LAUNCHING OF THE CORSAIR; J.P. Morgan's New Yacht Slides Gracefully

    The steam yacht Corsair, which has been built by Marvel of Newburg, was successfully launched yesterday. The yacht was built for Commodore J. Pierpont Morgan of the New York Yacht Club,...

  15. J. Pierpont Morgan's yacht Corsair IV became a cruise ship to Mexico

    Corsair IV was constructed in Maine at the beginning of the Great Depression for $2.5 million (or about $60 million in today's currency). Measuring 2,142 gross tons, with a registered length of 300 feet and overall length of 343 feet, the Corsair IV was the largest yacht ever built in the U.S. Designed in the traditional piratical look of Morgan yachts, Corsair IV was long, dark, heavy ...

  16. J.P. Morgan´s Corsair (II) in 1892

    J.P. Morgan´s Corsair (II) in 1892 Commuting in style. American financier and banker J.P. Morgan (1837 - 1913) sometimes enjoyed commuting between his Hudson River estate and the office on Wall street by boat.

  17. Model of JP Morgan's "Corsair IV", 1930

    Exceptional, museum quality model of Corsair IV, JP Morgan's private steam yacht. This model is outfitted with raised paneled mahogany cabins, planked deck, turned brass fittings, rigged masts and etc. Detailed longboats and launches hang from davits. The vessel flies the New York Yacht Club burgee and the Morgan house flag.

  18. CORSAIR Accessible Online

    Named after Pierpont Morgan's yacht, CORSAIR is a comprehensive guide to the Morgan's collections.

  19. CORSAIR Online Collection Catalog (The Morgan Library & Museum)

    Named after Pierpont Morgan's yacht, CORSAIR is a single database providing unified access to over 250,000 records for medieval and Renaissance manuscripts, rare and reference books, literary and historical manuscripts, music scores, ancient seals and tablets, drawings, prints, and other art objects. Records continue to be added for the ...

  20. "Metallurgical Plant "Electrostal" JSC

    Round table 2021. "Electrostal" Metallurgical plant" JSC has a number of remarkable time-tested traditions. One of them is holding an annual meeting with customers and partners in an extеnded format in order to build development pathways together, resolve pressing tasks and better understand each other. Although the digital age ...

  21. Yuzhny prospekt, 6к1, Elektrostal

    Get directions to Yuzhny prospekt, 6к1 and view details like the building's postal code, description, photos, and reviews on each business in the building

  22. Moscow Metro Font › Fontesk

    July 14, 2020 featured in Display. Bold Color Cool Creative Cyrillic Geometric Neon Outlined Retro. Download Moscow Metro font, a multi-line display typeface in two styles, inspired by the Moscow underground map. Moscow Metro is ideal for posters and headlines, neon signage and other artworks.

  23. Electrostal History and Art Museum

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